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Think I may have buned up my lathe motor? :(

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  • Think I may have buned up my lathe motor? :(

    I had just finished two parting cuts, and they were pretty hard, but I thought I ran it pretty slow. When I finished, I did 2 light facing cuts on the same piece, and then turned the lathe off to examine. When I tried to turn it back on, now the motor just hums. I took the cover off, and it was plenty hot. I have a fan on it now, and when it cooled down a little, I tried again, but just the hum... any suggestions? Is it fried and need to be replaced?

    Thanks for any help

    Dave

  • #2
    It might be but some motors have a built in safety device when overheating the switch off till it cools down again or you may have tripped a switch in the fusebox have alook if it has a fusebox.Alistair
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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    • #3
      Did you try to turn the motor over by hand or with a wrench?
      Andy

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      • #4
        I can still turn the motor spindle by turning the flywheel? on the lathe itself. Where the belts attach to the lathe. The motor arbor feels to turn very easily. If it blew a breaker it wouldn't hum at all, would just be dead. I will let it cool further and hope that there is an internal thermal over-heat switch. Do these just reset when they cool down?

        Thanks again for any help

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        • #5
          Maybe something is happening with the starting circuit? Maybe grime or something is holding that starter centrifugal weight clutch thing back? This is 110v right?
          Andy

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          • #6
            Clean the starter circuit inside the motor.
            Clean the contacts and the rotor.
            Clean switch contacts. Check validity of connections.
            If no sucess, your motor is trashed.
            K Lively

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            • #7
              I posted the same topic about 3 weeks ago. I tried replacing the capacitors, but they fried. Then fiddled with the centrifuginal switch. Nothing.
              I ended up upgrading to a new Baldor 3-Phase motor with a VFD.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by vpt
                Maybe something is happening with the starting circuit? Maybe grime or something is holding that starter centrifugal weight clutch thing back? This is 110v right?
                This is 220v

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by polepenhollow
                  Clean the starter circuit inside the motor.
                  Clean the contacts and the rotor.
                  Clean switch contacts. Check validity of connections.
                  If no sucess, your motor is trashed.
                  K Lively
                  Thanks I will go through these checks. I may also replace the starting capacitor just to see.

                  Thanks!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by KiddZimaHater
                    I posted the same topic about 3 weeks ago. I tried replacing the capacitors, but they fried. Then fiddled with the centrifuginal switch. Nothing.
                    I ended up upgrading to a new Baldor 3-Phase motor with a VFD.
                    This doesn't give me much hope LOL. I actually took a 3-phase off this lathe and replaced it with the current single phase. I still have the motor so I could go that route... will see what the other checks give me first.

                    Thanks

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DebosDave
                      I actually took a 3-phase off this lathe and replaced it with the current single phase. I still have the motor so I could go that route...
                      ? ? ? ?

                      3ph & VFD, don't look back.

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                      • #12
                        Make sure you're getting both legs of your 220. You may have lost it in the motor, at a relay or at a fuse - though both leg fuses should be bonded together so if you trip one you loose both.

                        If you give the motor a twist while humming, will it come up to speed? Then it's probably the starting circuit. Take the bell housing off and take a look at the centrifugal switch, the contacts etc. Then check the start windings for an open circuit (check the run windings while you're at it). If that's the case, bag the motor and start shopping for a frequency drive

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                        • #13
                          Definately go back to 3 phase and buy a VFD, you'll love it on a lathe. fast stoping, quick reverse, speed adjustment while facing/cutoff, etc
                          Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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                          • #14
                            Can anyone point me to an affordable VFD that will also convert from single phase to 3-phase? Needs to handle a 3HP motor, so my understanding is I need a VFD rated for 5HP or better, and hard start? When I try to find these, it appears to only be 3-phase to 3-phase or prohibitively expensive

                            Dave

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                            • #15
                              You just need a single phase VFD rated at 3hp. The derating you likely read about applies to a 3 phase VFD runniing from single phase. I like the Hitachi SJ200 series (less than $300), but there are others cheaper.

                              IMO... there a 99% chance you just oiverheated your start cap - and it failed. I've seen tis many times. Replace the start cap and continue making chips.

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