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Cutting something in half to see what it looks like

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  • Cutting something in half to see what it looks like

    Being relentlessly curious about everything I cut a DC motor armature in half with my band saw yesterday. I know what is in there but a cross section can reveal details not otherwise apparent. Besides, it seemed like it had the potential to make a good conversaton piece.

    I think it does. A bunch of slices would make an interesting set of drink coasters.



    Has anybody else done the same to something else? Pictures?
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

  • #2
    i tried cutting a 555 in half a while ago, it only took about 5 minutes, and it didnt turn out too good. I lost two of the pins and the wires that connect the pins to the "chip".

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    • #3
      I remember a friend cutting a clapped out Jaguar 3.4 sedan in half a number of years ago. I can't remember anything notable that showed up in that section either and it was too big to make a useable display. The front seats were for customers in my shop for a while (not sectioned).
      .
      "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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      • #4
        I have a selection of oilfield stuff laying around I've been asked to section when I have time. Just haven't gotten to it.
        Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

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        • #5
          A Taylor acoustic guitar neck:


          Cheers,

          Frank Ford
          HomeShopTech

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Evan
            Being relentlessly curious about everything I cut a DC motor armature in half with my band saw yesterday. I know what is in there but a cross section can reveal details not otherwise apparent. Besides, it seemed like it had the potential to make a good conversaton piece.

            I think it does. A bunch of slices would make an interesting set of drink coasters.



            Has anybody else done the same to something else? Pictures?
            No but I have loads of what you have done kicking around the bandsaw.

            You can actually buy bulk motors from the scrapyards and they will buy the separate materials back, it saves them shredding and sorting.

            If you are well in with them you get big skeletal DC motors with loads of copper.
            Someone just starting out gets tiny AC motors fastened to 300# of reduction box
            .

            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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            • #7
              Originally posted by Evan


              whats the point of all the filler in there? I realize RPM and torque are usually based on the size and number of windings, but why wouldnt they make the motor smaller if those are all the windings it needs?

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              • #8
                I did some bullets many years ago, as we were curious about the core/jacket thickness and bond. Done laboriously with an eXacto hobby saw.

                And waaay back in high school, we did the usual sectioning of welds, and then treating with some sort of acid etch (ferric chloride?) to show the penetration. That was an abrasive saw, though.

                The only real "cutaway" I have is the body of a paintball gun called an Autococker. The owner had tried milling it, botched it, then tried to patch it by TIG welding, which warped it badly. He gave it to me, I decided it wasn't worth salvaging, and milled it in half on my old mill-drill. It's come in handy over the years as a part-fitting aid.



                I did, however, X-ray several paintball guns a few years back. We eventually 'shot' something like twenty different guns, and I eventually started selling posters of the more popular ones.



                Doc.
                Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Evan
                  A bunch of slices would make an interesting set of drink coasters.

                  That'd be real cool.


                  Andy

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by TGTool
                    I remember a friend cutting a clapped out Jaguar 3.4 sedan in half a number of years ago. I can't remember anything notable that showed up in that section either and it was too big to make a useable display. The front seats were for customers in my shop for a while (not sectioned).
                    At one time Jaguars appeared to be made of Steel-less Stain.
                    Paul Compton
                    www.morini-mania.co.uk
                    http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by EVguru
                      Steel-less Stain.


                      Dave
                      Just south of Sudspumpwater UK

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                      • #12
                        whats the point of all the filler in there?
                        It keeps the wires from shifting around and rubbing off the insulation which would short out a winding. Amazingly foresighted for a Lucas part.
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                        • #13
                          So is the black bit where they keep the darkness ?
                          .

                          Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                          • #14
                            Lucas motto:

                            "GENTLEMEN do not motor about after dark."
                            ----------
                            Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                            Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                            Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                            There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                            Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                            Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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                            • #15
                              I am routinely called upon to perform autopsies on failed parts, coils mostly. Most of the parts are overmolded coils, similar to the potted armature that Evan sectioned. Depending on the nature of the failure, I may have to use the lathe or the mill, whichever gets me to the region if interest the soonest. Most of the time I'm looking for a short to a metal housing, or the lack of solder on a terminal. Occasionally I have to look for evidence of where a wire or terminal used to be, the conductor having been vaporized due to a high-current arc.

                              I'll see if I have kept any of the postmortem photos.
                              Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                              ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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