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  • Lever Operated Collet Closers

    I am as fascinated by this device as I am ignorant of it's construction, usage, virtues and shortcomings.

    I've never seen one 'in the flesh', or seen one operate, but I believe I want one (need has nothing to do with it, it's the want that counts.) These have to have a 'coolness' factor of 9.8 or higher (on a scale of ten) in my distorted opinion. I have a nice Bison 5C chuck and could easily make a hand wheel closer, but none of those can seemingly quench the fires of desire for a LEVER operated collet closer.

    First off, they are sooooo expensive. Why??? Because of irrational consumers like myself, or is there something I'm technologically missing?

    They seem to be becoming less and less available. How could something so incredibly intriguing not generate greater interest and subsequent sales?

    I've looked all over the Internet for construction plans, as have others apparently, and found none (is that the scent of conspiracy I detect)?

    Are there any significant drawbacks to utilizing a lever operated unit as opposed to other mentioned systems?

    How do these units tighten and loosen the draw tube? Do they use powered spindle rotation? If so, how is over tightening prevented?

    Fred

  • #2
    Lever operated closures work on a cam mechinism to pull on the drawbar

    The problem is you pertty much have to first screw the collet in to JUST the right depth or the cam won't tighten enough, or overtighten.

    Theres likey some tricks to this, like maybe a collet stop in your drawtube.

    most people seem to use the handwheel design

    Motor rotation is not used, and if anything makes the lever design a little dangerious for a lathe because the handle will be whiping around.
    You'll see 5C collet 'blocks' sold with a lever operated closure often.. they are not that great however. Also generaly don't allow stock to pass all the way through the draw tube as the lever is in the way.

    They are really good for moving/swaping stock in a collet. but not that great at actualy improving collet change times because you still gotta manualy screw the collet in/out most of the way.

    a hand wheel design you just start the threads to prevent cross threading then give the handle a quick spin, insert stock (if not allready done) and a quick yank to tighten. More suitable when you have a big open space for the handle like on a lathe, and the handle must rotate.
    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Black_Moons
      Theres likey some tricks to this, like maybe a collet stop in your drawtube.

      if anything makes the lever design a little dangerious for a lathe because the handle will be whiping around...

      ???????????????

      Have you ever seen one in use, as none of the above is correct!

      Tha handle does not "spin around" as it has a thrust bearing in it. The handle remains stationary and the spindle/stock rotates with the bearing.

      There is uaually a collet adapter that plugs into the spindle that the taper of the coltet seats against. When the lever is actuated it pulls the collet against the seat causing it to constrict against the stock. The tension is adjusted by simply threading the draw tube into or out of the collet. It's quite simple and fast to set up and adjust!



      Last edited by Glenn Wegman; 03-04-2010, 05:09 PM.

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      • #4
        They are great for fast tool changes but if you don't use collets very much the regular draw bar if fine. I only have one because it came with the lathe.

        Andy

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Black_Moons
          Lever operated closures work on a cam mechinism to pull on the drawbar

          The problem is you pertty much have to first screw the collet in to JUST the right depth or the cam won't tighten enough, or overtighten.

          Theres likey some tricks to this, like maybe a collet stop in your drawtube.

          most people seem to use the handwheel design

          Motor rotation is not used, and if anything makes the lever design a little dangerious for a lathe because the handle will be whiping around.
          You'll see 5C collet 'blocks' sold with a lever operated closure often.. they are not that great however. Also generaly don't allow stock to pass all the way through the draw tube as the lever is in the way.

          They are really good for moving/swaping stock in a collet. but not that great at actualy improving collet change times because you still gotta manualy screw the collet in/out most of the way.

          a hand wheel design you just start the threads to prevent cross threading then give the handle a quick spin, insert stock (if not allready done) and a quick yank to tighten. More suitable when you have a big open space for the handle like on a lathe, and the handle must rotate.

          I have a royal lever type closer. Some of the info in the post above is incorrect. There is a knurled knob at the lever end that is turned with the fingers to thread the collet into its tube. I tighten this snug then back off about a half turn for starters. There is a splined hub that mounts to the end of your spindle, the closer has a "finger" that is pushed into one of the splines to hold the tension adjustment you desire. The lever assembly is anchored to the lathe with a threaded rod arm and does NOT rotate. Only the drawtube and a small hub actually rotate when the lathe is running. There is no "stop" in the drawtube, it is identical to a wheel closer type drawtube.

          Royal was the bog name in collet closers but no longer makes a closer. Grizzly has some in their catalog for about $350. There was a complete construction article for a lever type in a book called "Metalworking" "The best of PROJECTS IN METAL" Book Two. I got a copy of that book on fleabay a few years back. It came from a magazine called "Projects in Metal"
          Last edited by Sparky_NY; 03-04-2010, 05:09 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            "Expensive?" Not my view.

            My lever collet closer is just about the bestest accessory in my entire shop! I have just about every conceivable collet, and most of my work is an inch or less in diameter. Nothing like collets to grab and hold without scarring, nothing like a simple lever to slam it open and closed for stock changes. Takes me a bout 3 seconds to set the collet to stock diameter, and once set the adjustment stays put, so I can load it and unload it as fast as I can move my hands. Saves crazy amounts of time when I'm doing a batch of 100 items.


            I couldn't imagine working without a lever collet closer. . .
            Last edited by Frank Ford; 03-04-2010, 05:21 PM.
            Cheers,

            Frank Ford
            HomeShopTech

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Frank Ford
              "Expensive?" Not my view.

              My lever collet closer is just about the bestest accessory in my entire shop! .
              Yup!

              When I get time I'd like to make a pneumatic bar feed tube for mine.

              Then you can really knock out the parts as there is no need to stop the spindle and pull the bar out.....(I use one of the stations on my bed turret as a stop to locate the stock)

              Comment


              • #8
                using a collet chucking a ball.

                One of best tools for production work in a shop.



                Jim

                click on pic to see collet operate.
                Last edited by jimsehr; 03-04-2010, 06:19 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Pherdie
                  I am as fascinated by this device as I am ignorant of it's construction, usage, virtues and shortcomings.

                  I've never seen one 'in the flesh', or seen one operate, but I believe I want one (need has nothing to do with it, it's the want that counts.) These have to have a 'coolness' factor of 9.8 or higher (on a scale of ten) in my distorted opinion. I have a nice Bison 5C chuck and could easily make a hand wheel closer, but none of those can seemingly quench the fires of desire for a LEVER operated collet closer.

                  First off, they are sooooo expensive. Why??? Because of irrational consumers like myself, or is there something I'm technologically missing?

                  They seem to be becoming less and less available. How could something so incredibly intriguing not generate greater interest and subsequent sales?

                  I've looked all over the Internet for construction plans, as have others apparently, and found none (is that the scent of conspiracy I detect)?

                  Are there any significant drawbacks to utilizing a lever operated unit as opposed to other mentioned systems?

                  How do these units tighten and loosen the draw tube? Do they use powered spindle rotation? If so, how is over tightening prevented?

                  Fred

                  Fred,
                  It sounds like a post that I needed to right, word for word.
                  I will be watching the replys in this thread with interest. If you do happen to get a set of plans I would be greatfull if I could get a copy.
                  Davo

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sorry, my mistake. I forgot all about the thrust bearing style and thought the lever type would just be an extention of the simple cam type sold with 5C blocks.
                    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      There's a little work involved if you can find the closer assembly. I was able to pick up a Royal closer and tube, that needed extending, but had to adapt it to a 10 EE spindle.
                      http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...histles-98993/
                      Harry

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Black_Moons
                        Sorry, my mistake. I forgot all about the thrust bearing style and thought the lever type would just be an extention of the simple cam type sold with 5C blocks.
                        How about engage brain and close mouth for a change!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          We used to have a real nice one, it mounted on the front of the headstock of the EE and anchored to the ways. You didn't loose any spindle bore or length of bed.

                          You could change from chuck to collet in seconds. (okay... 2 minutes).

                          One of those baby's and a mimic and you were in business.....

                          Just wish I could remember who made it....

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JMS6449
                            How about engage brain and close mouth for a change!
                            You know, insulting someone when they are apologizing really makes you look like an ass. Just a thought.
                            Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by huntinguy
                              We used to have a real nice one, it mounted on the front of the headstock of the EE and anchored to the ways. You didn't loose any spindle bore or length of bed.

                              You could change from chuck to collet in seconds. (okay... 2 minutes).

                              One of those baby's and a mimic and you were in business.....

                              Just wish I could remember who made it....

                              That is how mine is pictured on the first page. I love the closer just can't find any collets for it.
                              Andy

                              Comment

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