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OT: What are they?

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  • OT: What are they?

    I was given about 300 lbs of small nut, bolts, and every kind of screw imaginal, all sorted out in little plastc trays. In the lot are these steel things. They have LEFT handed threads. The smaller of them is 3/8 thread and the larger 1/2" . Does any one know what they might me used for?
    I hate to dump them, but I don't have room for something I don't even know what it is.
    Thanks
    Mel
    _____________________________________________

    I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.

  • #2
    Look like left hand round to its. Gary P. Hansen
    In memory of Marine Engineer Paul Miller who gave his life for his country 7-19-2010 Helmand Province, Afghanistan. Freedom is not free, it is paid for with blood.

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    • #3
      Feet with adjustment made from the top, don't have to turn anything over to adjust.
      mark costello-Low speed steel

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      • #4
        Originally posted by lugnut
        They have LEFT handed threads. yes, and for a purpose The smaller of them is 3/8 thread and the larger 1/2" . Those are a very preferred size Does any one know what they might me used for? In the machine trade they are used quite extensively when fabbing standoffs, slide joints, rail installs among a few. I use them often. As an example: When my son turned 12 we
        started building and racing quarter midget karts. Son was the driver, har har(good stories and memories). After the completion of tube chassis construction, 3/8" motor plates were installed. Slots 2" long, the width of their dia, were made in the four places of what ever motor we were installing. The back side of the motor plates were counterbored the size and depth of the head. In some applications (necessity to height requirement)
        the 4 motor standoffs were made of 1" hex rod. (they could be for example, 1,2,3,4 in length). The female ends, one drilled and tapped for left hand thread while the other right. Round rod can be used if preferred but need be slotted on opposing sides somewhere within its length to accomidate an open end wrench of size and width of said tool. I prefer using hex.
        Once the motor is seated to plate standoffs they are tightened. What is nice about the little gizmos' is that they stay tight. You first install each left hand gizmo and torque to value the standoff. When placing the motor you tighten the right hand threaded bolts with one wrench while maintaining the standoff with another wrench. (non movement) Imagine double nutting a bolt with 2 wrenches. Sizzor motion of the wrenches to tighten. This is the same principle with the gizmos' and standoff. Maintaining left torque on the standoff (keeps it tight) while right torque on the standard bolt thru the motor case bolt is completed. Slotting the motor plate made easy motor adjustment to chains or belts being used.


        Other applications: There are to many to list. Electric motor installs, machine installs using standoffs, hidden areas having no applicable means of getting a wrench on a cap screw, mill jigs of all kinds, the list goes on.


        I hate to dump them, but I don't have room for something I don't even know what it is. They are called "Blind Fasteners" and for those sizes could be as much as $4.00 each. I believe they are stainless and brass from your photo.
        Just throw them away. har har

        Patch
        Last edited by Patch; 03-05-2010, 12:49 AM.

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        • #5
          All that's separating you from all the possibilities that they could be used for is a left hand thread tap, or some LHT nuts,
          they could prove to be ideal for flush mount panel attachments

          If you don't want them around give them away, sell them on E-bay, do anything but throw them out, I guarantee you someone is looking for them and the fact that they also took time materials and effort to build would make it a shame to just "bury" them...

          Here's something for thought, they already have a through hole in them and it wouldn't take much to broach an allen hex inside,

          Another thought - drill a special sequence of 3 or 5 holes around the radius head and then mimmick this pattern into a master socket built from tool steel - insert short dowels into the tool steel piece
          You now have an anti-theft fastener and guess what? it takes it a step further for when the thief tries to use a drift punch to rotate the fastener out he will inevitably be turning it in the wrong direction

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          • #6
            A.K. wants them, he told me.
            Andy

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            • #7
              ( I really don't - I don't know what id use them for ) (( but if I had them laying around Id find some space to store them instead of throwing them away))

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              • #8
                WE ARE CLEVER PEOPLE WOULD YOU SEE HIS LORDSHIP THROWING ANYTHING AWAY SHAME ON YOU.a GOOD ENGINEER CAN ALWAYS FOT IT IN.
                that's to say find space for alittle scew or two thousand .Grandpa Alistair
                Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                • #9
                  Thanks for all the replys gentlemen. But I do not and can't find a use for them, SO if someone wants them, I'll send them to you. I think they will all fit is $5 Flat Rate USPS box. They are yours for the postage. There are 50 of the 3/8 and 30 or the 1/2. They are all Steel. Send me a PM and I will send them.
                  Thanks again
                  Mel
                  _____________________________________________

                  I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.

                  Comment

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