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Need a new pulley for my very old Sears Drill Press

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  • Need a new pulley for my very old Sears Drill Press

    I need a new pulley for my very old Sears Drill Press

    http://www.theideashoppe.com/Terry/searsdrill.gif

    The pulley is worn out, it is made of pot metal. The drill press has a spline, and the pulley that slides up and down the spline. The spline drives the pulley.

    Where can I purchase a pulley like this, or make it my self? I have a South-Bend 9" x 36" lathe.

    Terry [email protected]

  • #2
    If the internal spline is still good, an option would be to machine the pulley down to where you wind up with a cylinder with a splined hole, then bore a new off the shelf pulley to fit this cylinder, press it in and put a couple of dutchmen in it to keep it from turning.

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    • #3
      You may be able to buy a sleeve that is already splined. I think McMaster Carr sells them and others may. Do a google on splined sleeves and see what happens.

      If you can get a sleeve all you need to do is drill and ream or bore and install the sleeve.
      It's only ink and paper

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      • #4
        You might want to check the Sears parts department for a replacement or similar replacement from a newer drill press. I've been surprised more than once when I found out that a replacement part was still available, and cheaper than a used one on ebay.

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        • #5
          Recently I was browsing some old issues of Home Shop Machinist when I came across an article by Rudy Kouhoupt [SP] rebuilding an old Atlas MF Horizontal Mill with worn pulleys. The magazine was the May June 1997 Issue, page 58. Provided your spline is good you could take a similar approach. He faced the worn sides of the pulley at the original angle making a new surface, Then he took a piece of aluminum plate, bored it for the correct diameter to match the bottom of the pulley and cut a hollow cone to match the angle he refaced on the pulley. Upon completion he cut this piece in half across the bore and used epoxy to glue it to the original pulley. After the glue dried he turned a new face on the aluminum piece he had glued in. The photos in the article make it look like a very good job and it should last as long as the original.

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          • #6
            That looks just like my old atlas drill; I was able to make an off the shelf pulley work without much trouble. There was a steel sleeve down the center of the old pulley, so the fix wound up being exactly like x39 suggested.

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