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  • PSTechPaul: have you tried Compatibility Mode on the off-chance making it run 'as Windows 7' will make it work?
    Otherwise, as long as your desktop/laptop has VT-x enabled (or you can enable it in the bios), performance should be fine for something like Windows 7/XP running in VMWare Player. Check for VT-x here. Just don't use XP for browsing the web as it's not been getting updates for quite some time now.

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    • Not a big deal but about everything is a collection of little deals so... Had a couple of wiring harness falling apart on a motorcycle. Heat or age or mice causing the vinyl jacket to fall apart. Was able to take one out where I could get at it and stretched it straight and tight with a bungee cord and wound a new sleeve from vinyl electrical tape. Tried something new and wrapped the first layer on sticky side out lapped enough to make a continuous tube. Then the second layer normally. Looked a lot smoother and I won't have to fight the gummy mess if I ever have to open it up.

      THE END

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      • It can be worth getting some self-amalgamating tape for jobs like that. It's not stickey, it stretches to cling over the wires tightly and it bonds to it self in a continuous layer.
        Location- Rugby, Warwickshire. UK

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        • Originally posted by Mark Rand View Post
          It can be worth getting some self-amalgamating tape for jobs like that. It's not stickey, it stretches to cling over the wires tightly and it bonds to it self in a continuous layer.
          For wiring looms I'd use this:
          https://www.amazon.com/Tesa-Wire-Loo.../dp/B00EH6IZ6Y

          Or if you want electrical vinyl tape 3M Super 33+ is unbeatable.
          Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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          • Here's what I use. Down side is that you have to work within a size range. I also use the stuff on the oil and coolant lines on my ATV to keep them from chafing against the frame.

            https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_s...=31AR4NPWCCAG8

            I keep at least a few yards of about 4 different sizes on hand for what ever comes up.
            My recommendation?

            No matter what I tell you, get a second opinion.

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            • Originally posted by GKman View Post
              ........Tried something new and wrapped the first layer on sticky side out lapped enough to make a continuous tube........
              I've done that to a guy's black steering wheel...
              Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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              • Replaced a bunch of old capacitors on some boards in my welding machine. Had to take it apart quite a bit to get at the second board but the quakity of the arc feels a lot better now.



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                • is that a Lincoln TIG welder?

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                  • No it's a Kemppi, finnish brand. This one is from 1994, SCR inverter, 300 amps, DC only. TIG and stick. HF start as well as lift-arc.
                    Last edited by DennisCA; 10-27-2018, 03:24 PM.

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                    • Got up early and dropped the pontoon boat off in the yard on cribbing so I could use the trailer to go pick up some 24' long sticks of 3x6" 1/"4 wall tubing to build my sawmill with. Guy I bought them of actually had a sawmill, used to be a toolmaker too, (long since retired) and we actually knew a lot of mutual people so it was a nice chat with a good ole timer. I like meeting guys like that. It's like looking into the future in a way.

                      Then I came home and played with the plasma cutter cutting out frame plates for the heep out of some 1/8". That little "toy" sure makes quick work of stuff like this.



                      Started hailing/snowing so I came back in the house for a break. Really wish I had a shop to work indoors on stuff like this.

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                      • Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
                        No it's a Kemppi, finnish brand. This one is from 1994, SCR inverter, 300 amps, DC only. TIG and stick. HF start as well as lift-arc.
                        Looks well built. No aluminum welding for you (though it's possible with DC).

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                        • Rainy, so serviced the Argo and replaced a trackbar link on the ram
                          "Good judgment comes from experience, and often experience comes from bad judgment" R.M.Brown

                          My shop tour www.plastikosmd.com

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                          • Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
                            Replaced a bunch of old capacitors on some boards in my welding machine. Had to take it apart quite a bit to get at the second board but the quakity of the arc feels a lot better now.
                            Seems to me that electrolytic capacitors used to last a lot longer. I think they are making them differently (cheaper) than they used to. I have the same gripe with batteries, I have started to remove the batteries from stuff that is expensive and not used often like a couple of my Fluke meters etc. I had a good programmable thermostat ruined this year and a couple other things like the the TV remote that actually gets the batteries changed once and awhile. I switched to Duracell on a friends advice but have found that they leak too.

                            Dwight

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                            • Well the electrolytic capacitors in this machine all look fine actually. The ones I replaced were RIFA paper capacitors. Notorious for degrading. But I think these should hold another 20 years or so. Next to fail is likely the electrolytics.

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                              • Originally posted by dmartin View Post
                                Seems to me that electrolytic capacitors used to last a lot longer. I think they are making them differently (cheaper) than they used to. I have the same gripe with batteries, I have started to remove the batteries from stuff that is expensive and not used often like a couple of my Fluke meters etc. I had a good programmable thermostat ruined this year and a couple other things like the the TV remote that actually gets the batteries changed once and awhile. I switched to Duracell on a friends advice but have found that they leak too.

                                Dwight
                                Duracell is the leakiest battery today.. even IKEA batteries seem to do better. Energizer alkalines are reasonably safe bet but if you want bomb-proof go for Energizer ultimate lithium or rechargeable Panasonic/Sanyo Eneloop batteries.
                                Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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