Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What did you do today?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by Mark Rand View Post
    I wanna see videos of a front loading drum type dishwasher in action!
    doh, yes, clothes washer

    that said, a drum type dishwasher sure would get the pieces of plates and glasses really dry

    Comment


    • Cleaning up a space for a future milling machine

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Tungsten dipper View Post
        I love the cats!!!
        They are adorable. Here is the full size picture (2MB) of the cats (4032 x 3032) that I took with the new iPad (1st picture taken)

        http://www.bbssystem.com/pictures/IMG_0001.jpg

        And a very large (10MB) full size Panoramic image of my messy office (16382 x 3628)

        http://www.bbssystem.com/pictures/IMG_0004.jpg

        Comment


        • Here is a thumbscrew I made so I could easily remove the handle so I could store the jack under my workbench. Then I keep the handle in the corner.
          The video https://youtu.be/MVPW4M4brwc


          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

          Comment


          • Most of us don't have a half hour to waste every day watching someone else playing in the shop. Try editing your videos down to a minute or two.
            Location- Rugby, Warwickshire. UK

            Comment


            • Today I climbed the hill to inspect the meadow and I extracted a bunch of cut locust logs from the high grass:


              Then I came down to my storage shed that was originally an outhouse, and now packed with an assortment of new and old lumber, doors, plywood, flooring, trim, and whatnot:


              Pulled out a lot of the stuff so I could access the new 2x4s I'll use for the shed(s) I'm building:


              Finally, and more on-topic, I cleaned up some old machinist tools that I inherited from my father, who worked as a machinist at Martin's in the 1940s. They had gotten rusty in my damp workshop, so I spent some time using vinegar to loosen some of the rust, followed by abrasive pads. I doubt I will ever use most of these tools, and I'm not sure what some of them are. The one item is a Starrett #56 surface gauge with long and short posts and indicator points. There is also a trammel bar with several scriber holders, one of which has a graphite marker. There is a locking screwdriver that fits the narrow slots on the adjustment screws, and various small rules, angles, dividers, and layout tools.
              http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
              Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
              USA Maryland 21030

              Comment


              • In the left pic, the inside and outside calipers at the bottom are handy items, and are the better type, with the adjuster on-center and not off to the side.

                Above that is a hermaphrodite caliper that is very good for center finding, as well as scribing lines a distance in from an edge. I never have had much use for regular dividers like the other two.

                In the other pic, the depth gage is handy, as is the mic adjustment spanner, if you have the type mic that uses that kind, there are all sorts of different styles. Can't tell about the center top item.... I have a similar item that is settable for small angles, used as a guide for the relief in die making, not super useful for other things.

                I would not despise older tools, they turn out to have uses even when you have all sorts of more modern whiz-bang measuring stuff. Those outside calipers look as if they will fit down in piston ring grooves, o-ring grooves, etc, which many other measuring tools will not, for instance....
                4357 2773 5150 9120 9135 8645 1007 1190 2133 9120 5942

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

                Everything not impossible is compulsory

                "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

                Comment


                • Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                  Today I climbed the hill to inspect the meadow and I extracted a bunch of cut locust logs from the high grass:

                  Then I came down to my storage shed that was originally an outhouse, and now packed with an assortment of new and old lumber, doors, plywood, flooring, trim, and whatnot:

                  Pulled out a lot of the stuff so I could access the new 2x4s I'll use for the shed(s) I'm building:

                  Finally, and more on-topic, I cleaned up some old machinist tools that I inherited from my father, who worked as a machinist at Martin's in the 1940s. They had gotten rusty in my damp workshop, so I spent some time using vinegar to loosen some of the rust, followed by abrasive pads. I doubt I will ever use most of these tools, and I'm not sure what some of them are. The one item is a Starrett #56 surface gauge with long and short posts and indicator points. There is also a trammel bar with several scriber holders, one of which has a graphite marker. There is a locking screwdriver that fits the narrow slots on the adjustment screws, and various small rules, angles, dividers, and layout tools.
                  The pictures must be after you cleaned them, they look good.
                  Dwight

                  Comment


                  • Scary on the road I would imagine

                    Got the other shed out into the woods (pistol range shooting shed) It was tight. This
                    Little deere still amazes me

                    I had to go in about 300 yards, I have to get the dozer in to flatten a pad at the pistol range. Trails were sloped, canted and tight. Basically atv trail.



                    "Good judgment comes from experience, and often experience comes from bad judgment" R.M.Brown

                    My shop tour www.plastikosmd.com

                    Comment


                    • Spent a couple hours trying to figure out why my 13x40 HF lathe will not start up. It was working fine, and I finished a small job and turned it off. Went back an hour later and the thing won't start up. The pilot lamp is lit, so power is getting to the machine. Both fuses in the control cabinet checked OK. The machine has a red panic stop knob/button that is twisted to reset power, a lighted, green start button, and a black jog button; none of which seem to be getting power. The control cabinet is at the rear of the machine and is nearly inaccessible. Figuring this out, and fixing it is not going to be a fun project.
                      “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                      Lewis Grizzard

                      Comment


                      • I feel your pain DaveC. Mine isn't quite as bad as it's the reverse. My emergency stop button stopped stopping. Tried replacement button but it seems to be the control board. Just had one posted to me but like yours the back of my lathe is almost inaccessible. Temporary (and yet permanent) solution has been to out an e-stop button o the wall that takes out the whole circuit.

                        Your e-stop button should be easy enough to test with a multimeter with the power off. My one has six terminals but that's probably an oddity as there is a power outlet on the back for a milling head. It's essentially just a DPDT switch though so it should show continuity through two terminals (or two pairs in my case) when unpushed and continuity through the other when pushed. The second output is used on some to indicate the button is pushed - for a warning light for example.

                        Comment


                        • Formed, poured, and installed a new lid on the dug well.







                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Ridgerunner View Post
                            Formed, poured, and installed a new lid on the dug well.
                            Do you need to inspect inside the well much? I was thinking since you made your own lid, it wouldn't have been to difficult to also include a smaller inspection port maybe ~12" round or square/etc.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
                              Do you need to inspect inside the well much? I was thinking since you made your own lid, it wouldn't have been to difficult to also include a smaller inspection port maybe ~12" round or square/etc.
                              Yes, and no. I had thought of an opening when I was pouring it; to make an opening like in a septic tank lid, but figured I could always just lift the whole lid off if I needed access. Gas and coal mining companies in the area need to monitor wells, springs, and streams so I just core drilled a hole for a four inch pipe with a screw on cap in the concrete lid so the companies and government could dip for water samples.

                              Comment


                              • got 3 of these.



                                wired them up, one with with Andersen Power Poles, one got 2.1 mm DC connectors, and one has spade tips. thinking I should wire just one up with all three

                                troubleshooting tool for auto and ham shack uses

                                cut my handheld voltmeter test leads and added Andersen Power Poles. put a long ground lead in the cab, the camper shell, and under the hood, with an Andersen Power Pole. now I have a known good ground hands free everywhere. now I can swap the hot lead for Andersen Power Poles, spade tips, clips, no more 4 handed jobs juggling the volt meter, the leads, trying to find a good ground, holding a lead on a spade tip tab...
                                Last edited by AD5MB; 11-03-2018, 03:02 PM.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X