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  • Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
    R8 works for me. It works so well I had a 3/4" roughing end mill pull a 3-pound chuck of steel out of the vice. It wasn't too long after that I had a new Kurt vice to latch onto parts. I'm waiting on inserts to try out a new 5" face mill.
    It won't be too long after that and you'll have a larger milling machine

    Comment


    • I think that R8 used to be difficult to get tooling for here and so 3MT was the defacto HSM standard. Now that's no longer the case and I think that R8 is perhaps superior. The issue with 3MT for a spindle is purely in getting the damn things back out again if you've tightened them enough to be sure they aren't going to slip on you. More of an issue with finger collets where to grip the tool more, you are tightening the drawbar and jamming the 3MT into the spindle. Must get round to making some risers so that's not so much of a requirement.....although that's bound to just lead to taller workpieces!

      Was jealous of the Kurts until I realised two things: the cost is definitely in divorce territory....and sticking one on my mill would most likely topple the mill! Definitely jealous of your 5" facemill. My machine's only rated for 35mm (1" 3/8) which hardly seems worth it!

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
        I think that R8 used to be difficult to get tooling for here and so 3MT was the defacto HSM standard. Now that's no longer the case and I think that R8 is perhaps superior. The issue with 3MT for a spindle is purely in getting the damn things back out again if you've tightened them enough to be sure they aren't going to slip on you. More of an issue with finger collets where to grip the tool more, you are tightening the drawbar and jamming the 3MT into the spindle. Must get round to making some risers so that's not so much of a requirement.....although that's bound to just lead to taller workpieces!

        Was jealous of the Kurts until I realised two things: the cost is definitely in divorce territory....and sticking one on my mill would most likely topple the mill! Definitely jealous of your 5" facemill. My machine's only rated for 35mm (1" 3/8) which hardly seems worth it!
        You should be able to sport a 5" fly-cutter though? I'm probably talking out of my arse, but I assume a 5" fly-cutter can mostly do the work of a 5" facemill but at a much lower/slower speed/feed.

        Comment


        • I've got plans for a 6" flycutter as I need that for a project. It's somewhat on a back-burner though as I've had trouble with both lathe (seems like the control board is the current suspect), mill (upgraded the column and trying to get it all in tram) and my back. This is only for some (really-) hardwood though so it's not going to be quite such a ridiculous load as it would be for steel!

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
            I think that R8 used to be difficult to get tooling for here and so 3MT was the defacto HSM standard. Now that's no longer the case and I think that R8 is perhaps superior. The issue with 3MT for a spindle is purely in getting the damn things back out again if you've tightened them enough to be sure they aren't going to slip on you. ........
            You make an ejecting drawbar.... then it is no strain at all, just unscrew the drawbar, and keep unscrewing until it pops out the taper. My Lewis horizontal mill has an MT3, so I made an ejecting drawbar. I do not need to get it that tight, the MT holds very well if the spindle taper is correct and clean, without burrs inside.

            In the pics, the second shows the drawbar on the spindle. the cap screws onto the back of the spindle, which has protruding threads. The first pic shows the tightening nut on the left end, the cap, and the inner ring that is pinned to the drawbar.

            When loosening the drawbar, the inner ring hits the inside of the cap, which then pushes the MT out the front of the spindle. I use one small wrench on the tightening nut, and a larger one on the flats of the cap, to avoid unscrewing it when turning the nut. With the wrenches set so one hand can squeeze them together, a rather light squeeze is enough to pop loose the MT.

            You want the drawbar to pretty much fill the hole through the spindle, so that it is stiff, and cannot buckle sideways when pushing out the MT. I am not sure how important that is with a short spindle on a horizontal mill, but a long spindle might make it more important.



            Last edited by J Tiers; 11-07-2018, 09:57 AM.
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            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

            Everything not impossible is compulsory

            "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

            Comment


            • The event with 3-pound chunk of steal occurred during the making of my ~6" flycutter. I need to make a longer bar for balance. Anything above about 300rpm starts the mill a walkin'.

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              • Setup a little personal coffee station at my desk in my office. We have a large Keurig K155 commercial machine in the kitchen but I'm the only one that drinks coffee. The kids don't make hot chocolate anymore either so it's kind of a waste to keep it running except when we have company over. I also don't like how it has a large water reservoir that sits untreated unless the unit stays on with the UV light. I wanted to get a small single serve without a large water reservoir and found this unit on Amazon which is really great. It's a k-cup machine and brews up to a 12oz cup of coffee in ~2 minutes and does a really good job. It's a tiny machine too. Those are 12oz coffee cups next to it for a size reference.

                https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B010NMMPH0

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                • Today I stopped at my mechanic's shop to find out why I have been hearing a rattle and clunking sound from the rear end of my 1999 Saturn SL1. It's been getting worse, and I suspected maybe shocks or bushings or even a muffler clamp. Well, it was a shock, alright!



                  He said, "You need a new car", and at first I thought he was kidding. But I'm surprised that I can even drive it. Actually, it's not really safe to drive, so I will have to use my 1989 Toyota pickup until I find something. He has several vehicles on his lot that are for sale. One is a 1998 or so Mercedes SUV that he would sell for $2500. There is also a 2005 or so Hyundai for $1500, but needs $1000 of work. And he also has a 2009 Honda Passport SUV in good shape that one of his customers wants him to fix up to sell. I'd prefer a small car with good fuel economy like my Saturn, which gets 35-45 MPG, but I don't really drive very much (maybe 5000 miles a year), so a 15 MPG increase would be only be about 58 gallons per year increase (based on 35and 20), or $174 per year. I will also check Craig's List and Facebook Marketplace to see what is out there and reasonable price estimates for these vehicles. I figure to spend up to $5000.

                  So, more pictures:





                  I should have taken pictures when the car was up on the lift, but I was still in shock and there was another vehicle coming in so I had to move mine out quickly. It probably could be welded, but there are other places with pretty severe rust, and this mess is next to the gas lines and tank. Maybe I can get $500 for the car as-is? It has only 110,000 miles and nearly new tires, doesn't use oil, and runs great. But since Saturn has shut down, parts are hard to get.
                  http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                  Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                  USA Maryland 21030

                  Comment


                  • Printed a knee cranker for the bridgeport clone. Takes a 3/8" square or 1-1/16" socket. First print was no good so i tweaked it and got it working well.

                    Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk

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                    • @PStechPaul

                      "Today I stopped at my mechanic's shop to find out why I have been hearing a rattle and clunking sound from the rear end of my 1999 Saturn SL1"

                      Last year I had to junk my 1999 Saturn SL2: In the front, the sub-frame was rotted out; in the rear was additional (unexplored) rot. Engine and tranny were fine (120K only) - car should have gone another 100K.

                      Those plastic body panels didn't buy me much.

                      Comment


                      • It's been a good car. I bought it in June 2008 for $4200, and it hasn't needed any major repairs. Prior to this, I had a 1998 SL1 and a 1997 SW1, both of which were totaled while parked in my driveway, so the drunks that did the damage paid me reasonably enough, especially since they had high mileage and were using oil. The plastic doors and panels are deceptive, not showing any sign of rust, while underneath, the frame is rotting to hell. I've had other vehicles with frame rot, but this is the first one that really showed symptoms of being a "clunker".

                        Quick check on local Craig's List:

                        https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...733800408.html (2004 Mercedes ML350 6 cyl auto 4WD 140k $3800)

                        https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...722566012.html (2003 Honda Pilot auto 222k $3000)

                        https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...743124468.html (2005 Honda Pilot auto 165k $3500)

                        https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...731283310.html (2005 Honda Pilot auto 119k $4200)

                        https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...734310566.html (2004 Honda Pilot auto trasmission leak 200k $1450)

                        https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...728652238.html (2005 Honda Pilot auto 179k $2200)

                        https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...738047606.html (2001 Hyundai Elantra GLS auto 79k $2600 Lutherville)

                        https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...727013537.html (2007 Hyundai Santa Fe 3.3L V6 auto 68k $1400 Westminster)

                        https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...743379555.html (2005 Toyota Prius auto 155k needs minor work $3500 Ellicott City)

                        https://baltimore.craigslist.org/cto...737535216.html (2005 Toyota Prius auto 201k $2750 Fallston)

                        Some interesting deals. Decisions....
                        Last edited by PStechPaul; 11-07-2018, 07:46 PM. Reason: links
                        http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                        Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                        USA Maryland 21030

                        Comment


                        • Clunker? That's a death trap! That wouldn't pass a safety inspection down here. And now you've made it impossible to sell without serious legal culpability risks. Once on the interweb always on the interweb.

                          Comment


                          • To continue the rusty car theme in the oposite direction.....: )
                            Did more work on the Heep frame tonight after work. Tacked the side panels together, then cleaned them all up to the same size. While they were still together I use them as a bending form to heat, and beat the top and bottom plates to shape.


                            I can pull the rest of it together with clamps while welding it out.
                            here's the peices all done and cleaned up ready for welding. Not shown are the fish plates for the sides.

                            and mocked up with some spacer blocks inside to keep things square and spaced properly.

                            I was going to weld them out at work tonight as we just got a new (to us) millermatic 250 and I've been itching to try it but I didn't bring my hood, and the gen pop one we have at work sucks really bad (because people are muppets and don't look after things).

                            Lipstick on a pig you say? Not worth the effort? I agree on both counts. : )

                            Comment


                            • Pass a safety inspection? Heck I'm surprised it got passed a pothole in the road without loosing one of the rear axles.

                              This is the trailing arm that locates the rear axle and suspension, the eye that holds the bushing to the mount has even opened up completely. Not that the trailing arm's mounting point to what is left of the frame is any less precarious.




                              Your mechanic was right, it is time for another car. Not that you aren't aware of this.

                              Unfortunately the salt has recruited another soldier off to the the dismantlers. Welding is not a viable option due to the extent of rust and components that will need to be replaced.It will take more in parts never mind labor than the car is worth.
                              It's sad when this happens to a car that runs well, gets good mileage, and has a nice set of tires on it. Unfortunately it is worth more as parts than as a car.

                              Move forward Paul and consider yourself lucky to having not been involved in a serious collision with the car. Had you not had it inspected this could have just as easily ended much worse.
                              I always try to look at the things I can be thankful for, not at what I don't have at times like these.

                              Sounds like you are already getting close to ending this chapter in your automotive career. Good luck with the new car!
                              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                              Location: British Columbia

                              Comment


                              • Yeah, it was just rather a sudden shock, but I also realize that I was quite lucky to have taken it in today. I had just assumed it was something simple, not a serious safety hazard. Too bad this one didn't get totaled by another speeding drunk like the other two.

                                Actually, I've been lucky with safety issues on this car. A few years ago I suddenly lost the brakes when pulling out of a spot on a local parking lot. I was able to limp home and then to the the shop where my mechanic replaced a rusted brake line. A couple years later I had been driving up and down the mountains near Harper's Ferry, and then when I finally arrived at my campground, I lost brakes again, and a guy who lived there was able to replace another line that had rusted. In 2010 I had driven to an event on a Sunday 60 miles away in Harrisburg. When I tried to start the car to leave the battery was totally dead, and I had it towed to a local garage, who was luckily open, and he was able to replace the battery (for only like $100) so I could get home. Another time I was visiting a friend near Frederick, and as I was leaving, the gear shift mechanism broke and it was stuck in 2nd. I was able to limp about10 miles into town where I got a temporary repair at a tire place, and then a permanent (I thought) fix by my mechanic. But a year later as I was leaving his shop after an oil change, it happened again, and he was able to do a better fix. And another time I was heading to my machine shop class, and 1/2 mile down the road the car died. I had it towed to my mechanic's, where he had to replace the fuel pump.

                                I'm now looking forward to getting another vehicle. I was pleasantly surprised to find the cars listed above for such good prices. But now I am torn between getting something like the Prius for fuel economy and "green" statement, but repairs might bean issue, especially battery replacement. Or a small car like the Hyundai. Or the Honda Pilot SUV. I think the Mercedes would be a lot more expensive to repair, but it's probably a high quality vehicle. And none of the vehicles has a manual transmission, which I prefer. I'll probably go back to the shop tomorrow and have a better look at his vehicles, and get his opinion on the other options I found.
                                http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                                Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                                USA Maryland 21030

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