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  • I paid $2k for my wagovan over 10 years ago. Have been beating the living daylights out of it ever since. My kids will learn to drive (stick) in it very soon. All I do are oil changes with it. 170K and going strong.

    Andy

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    • Originally posted by thaiguzzi View Post
      Wow!
      S/H Cars seem pricey in the States.
      That car would be 1500-1800$ on a used car lot in the UK all day long.
      Here in Thailand, S/H cars keep their value to a ridiculous extent. My missus comes over to the UK on holiday every 3-4 years and cannot believe how cheap the S/H car market is. My Dad sold a very clean zero rust 10 y/o Vauxhall 5 seater nice hatchback for 650 GBP, the same car in Thailand would be in excess of 5k......
      That's because UK has nowhere to dump the LH cars.
      (otherwise we would be importing them as used cars are very expensive around here. Mentioned Honda is in 6-9 k usd range.
      Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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      • Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
        That's because UK has nowhere to dump the LH cars.
        (otherwise we would be importing them as used cars are very expensive around here. Mentioned Honda is in 6-9 k usd range.
        Thailand
        Myanmar
        Malaysia
        Japan
        Australia
        New Zealand
        half of Africa

        6-9k$ for that???
        "very" as in very expensive is a bit of an understatement Matti....

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        • made a 36mm "crows foot" wrench to get the chainring spider nut off my road bike. Standard deal of drilling out the corners, cutting out most of the material with the bandsaw and using a file. used a piece of road side scrap that had a hole already in the right place


          it isn't pretty but it does work


          the insides of an e-bike motor if anyone's interested

          Comment


          • Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
            made a 36mm "crows foot" wrench to get the chainring spider nut off my road bike. Standard deal of drilling out the corners, cutting out most of the material with the bandsaw and using a file. used a piece of road side scrap that had a hole already in the right place


            it isn't pretty but it does work


            the insides of an e-bike motor if anyone's interested
            Yea, you would have needed one of these, eh?

            2.5" / 63mm adjustable wrench:

            https://www.harborfreight.com/24-inc...nch-39621.html

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            • Chain riveting tool made from scratch....for my good old Africa Twin





              Comment


              • Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
                Yea, you would have needed one of these, eh?

                2.5" / 63mm adjustable wrench:

                https://www.harborfreight.com/24-inc...nch-39621.html
                huh, that'd be a fabulous way to round off a shallow highly torqued nut

                mark - for future refinement if neccessary, adding a 2nd step in the middle allows you to spread the plates slightly if pressing the chain together creates a tight spot in the chain. I don't know how much of a deal that is with motorbike chains, but it's come in handy a few times on my bike. I just use quick links now though.

                lovely bike, that'll get you across several continents without a worry!
                Last edited by mattthemuppet; 11-15-2018, 05:35 PM.

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                • Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post

                  mark - for future refinement if neccessary, adding a 2nd step in the middle allows you to spread the plates slightly if pressing the chain together creates a tight spot in the chain. I don't know how much of a deal that is with motorbike chains, but it's come in handy a few times on my bike. I just use quick links now though.

                  lovely bike, that'll get you across several continents without a worry!
                  Thanks....she is a beauty, but needs some work and care to get back to top notch condition. I acquired the bike this spring from an elderly chap who was an avid moto enthusiast and took long trips across Europe, but then got too comfortable for that hobby and decided to part with the bike I guess. He had been quite meticulous....every bolt and fastener was lubed with copper anti seize and it was evident that the machine was generally well taken car of. Came with a lot of accessories too. All good apart from the fact that she had an idling issue.....I took apart the carbs and intake for cleaning and then noticed that there was an abundant sediment of dust and grit in the whole tract. To my horror I discovered that the air filter box was missing the bottom rubber seal that would seat the filter element in the box and basically it had been running without an air filter for God knows how long. The previous owner claimed that he had no idea there was a problem with the filter seat and to be honest I do believe him....but ffs does it have to be the air filter that has received a lack of attention on an otherwise well cared for bike!!
                  Well no matter....my intention was to get a project that I could tinker on more than a top notch bike to drive around the world anyways. It seems that I got exacly what I was shopping for

                  In fact I am in a bit of a dilemma....tear all apart and refurbish the engine or just keep riding it? I mean it does not seem to burn any oil, does not smoke, starts right up with just a touch on the starter and has pretty ok power for a machine that age (26 years young). The compression values were not too good though....

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by markx View Post
                    Chain riveting tool made from scratch....for my good old Africa Twin





                    Good job on chain tool,have you seen any Royal Enfeild Himalayan bikes over there,as far as I know none in Canada yet.They are kinda a beginner bike made in India.

                    Comment


                    • it's potentially a lot of work to strip the engine down, but if compression values aren't great it would make sense to do it sooner rather than later. Does that twin come with bore liners? If it does it might be straight forward to get a set of liners and pistons. Otherwise if the bores are scored badly, you're looking at boring oversize and getting oversize pistons.

                      Comment


                      • I pulled the heater fan on the 2000 S10... tested and put a new one on order.

                        Chevy sure messed up on that one. I DID manage to get all 5 screws out of the mount flange, even the one underneath hidden under wring and scrunched between part of the fender and the fan. Once I had the fan loose, I discovered that it seemed to be 100% impossible to remove it, since someone at Chevy stuck a welded-in bolt directly in the way, and no position of the mount flange would pass it.

                        I got out a Dremel, with cutting disk, poked it down in the hole, and cut that sucker down. Got the fan out, although it took a little force.

                        Fan housing was packed half full, not with acorns, but with pine needles. We have pine trees around here, and a couple of them are right above the driveway. They have been falling into the vent for many years.
                        Last edited by J Tiers; 11-16-2018, 06:45 PM. Reason: Fixed the fat finger foulup
                        4357 2773 5150 9120 9135 8645 1007 1190 2133 9120 5942

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Everything not impossible is compulsory

                        "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

                        Comment


                        • GM has been doing that for years. I used to work at a Pontiac dealership in a previous life. To replace the fan motor, you had to cut a hole in the inner fender well and remove it that way. The new factory part came with the motor, cover plate, screws and a seal. Pontiacs were designed that way. If you cleaned dirt off the inner fender, the stamped location was clearly visible. At least they did that for you.

                          Comment


                          • All that was in the way was the bolt. I probably could have cut more off of it than I did, but at this point, I'll leave it unless I have trouble getting the new one in.

                            I did have to move the ECU, and the coolant tank before I could do the removal. The bolt in question was for the coolant tank. I just put it down to "being Chevvied". It's the first time I have been seriously "Chevvied" with this vehicle.

                            The 5th screw took about an hour to remove, using the smallest socket wrench I have to fit in. AND, it was a 5.5 mm head.... I had 4.5, 5, and 6mm sockets, but did have a 5.5mm ignition wrench. That would not do it, no room to swing it. But a 7/32 socket was an acceptable fit, just a little less good than 5.5mm.
                            Last edited by J Tiers; 11-16-2018, 06:52 PM.
                            4357 2773 5150 9120 9135 8645 1007 1190 2133 9120 5942

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            Everything not impossible is compulsory

                            "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

                            Comment


                            • I used my electric chainsaw to cut a piece of locust from the tree that had clipped my roof and smashed the cap on my Toyota PU in March. When I tried to make another cut, the saw would not run - it just made a loud buzz. I tried to move the chain by hand, but it wouldn't budge. It looked like some wet wood chips and other debris might have been pulled into the drive, so I took it apart:


                              I pulled the armature, but the other end was seized in the housing:




                              I sprayed a little PB Blaster on the bearing, and when I twisted the armature, it came loose. What happened was that the fan had started rubbing on the plastic housing and melted it. I think the fan needs to be pressed further back for clearance, and possibly adding a thrust washer:


                              The chainsaw has been making noise, which I thought was a failing bearing, but they look OK. Roller bearings with plastic cages. Overall the quality of this saw seems pretty good, and I only paid about $40 for it about 15-20 years ago.
                              http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                              Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                              USA Maryland 21030

                              Comment


                              • The heater fan on my 1994 Chevy pickup is not easy to change but it's not too bad either. You do have to remove the computer though. Slightly newer ones are much easier to do and only take a few minutes with no computer in the way. Older Chevy pickups were great and could be changed out in 5 minutes and that included finding the tools and putting them away again. Those sat right on top of the heater housing under the hood and were super easy to access. My 2006 Nissan X-Trail (with less than 27,000 Km ) takes a skilled mechanic about 4 hours apparently and if you have to replace it, Nissan wants around C$400 last I heard. It's my "only drive on warm sunny days" vehicle (so far) so hopefully it will outlast me.
                                Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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