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  • Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post
    Does earthquake insurance cover the effort to re-sort all the stuff that would be dumped onto the floor? <G>
    It most certainly does in deed not cover it

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    • Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
      It most certainly does in deed not cover it
      Just epoxy all the stuff into the bins. Won't fall out then ;-p

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      • Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
        Just epoxy all the stuff into the bins. Won't fall out then ;-p
        You just gave me a good idea. I've been wondering about trying to catalog everything and an easy way to locate which bin something is in, and if I even have what I'm looking for without going through and looking in all of the bins.

        If I take one item out of each bin and epoxy each item onto a piece of cardboard or hardboard in a grid that matches the bin grid and display them as panels, I'll be able to just see all hardware nicely labeled and displayed and can quickly see if I have what I'm looking for and know which bin to go grab it from too, vs looking through all of the bins. It would also be a good way of organizing the bins in sections.

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        • Most bins have a card holder in the front to write a description.

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          • It'd be cheaper to just glue a picture of it to the card board. That's how they do it at the hardware stores.

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            • Originally posted by 754 View Post
              Most bins have a card holder in the front to write a description.
              I can also see inside the bins. Walking around checking 100's of bins and bending up and down to see if you have something is what I'm trying to avoid.

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              • Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                It'd be cheaper to just glue a picture of it to the card board. That's how they do it at the hardware stores.
                I was thinking of just taking pictures but think it might be hard to gauge the actual size from the pictures. I have so much unknown and non-labeled hardware that it would take forever to actually size it and label it so I was thinking a visual display that is significantly condensed is probably the easiest way. And when I'm looking for an unknown sized nut for example, if I glue one sample of each nut I have to a hard board, I could actually try threading the bolt that I have in my hand into the nuts until I find one that fits/etc.

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                • I guess you can't tell bolt size by looking at the threads, use a caliper if the EYEcrometer does not work..
                  I arrange mine in drawers with partitions then label.
                  So 1/4 inch , next drawer 5/16, next 3/8..... I may have 3/8 to 2.5 and another drawer for 3/8 longer than that.
                  Same with nuts. . And the dividers separate fine from coarse most of the time. Lockwashers from flatwashers etc..

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                  • You could turn the picture into a line drawing and put that on there to identify the fastener type/style. I don't have any of mine labeled. I keep a pretty good selection of 1/4, 5/16 and 3/8" bolts and screws from #6 to #12 and 1/4". I can usually tell the size and thread by looking at them. I don't need no stinking labels. When I go, I sure don't want to make it easy for the auctioneer. He's going to sell them as a lot anyway. Let the next slob worry about it.

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                    • Here is video of some of the bins.

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                      • Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                        You could turn the picture into a line drawing and put that on there to identify the fastener type/style. I don't have any of mine labeled. I keep a pretty good selection of 1/4, 5/16 and 3/8" bolts and screws from #6 to #12 and 1/4". I can usually tell the size and thread by looking at them. I don't need no stinking labels. When I go, I sure don't want to make it easy for the auctioneer. He's going to sell them as a lot anyway. Let the next slob worry about it.
                        You definitely have a lot better calibrated eyeball than I have!
                        Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                        • I wouldn't need labels for those but I would at least keep like items in an area of arms reach or so. But that's the way I work. I don't always need a washer, nut and bolt but some people do. I usually don't need small screws getting in the way of looking for nuts either. But, arrange the bins for you!

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                          • Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                            I wouldn't need labels for those but I would at least keep like items in an area of arms reach or so. But that's the way I work. I don't always need a washer, nut and bolt but some people do. I usually don't need small screws getting in the way of looking for nuts either. But, arrange the bins for you!
                            They definitely need to be re-arranged. I mostly just threw them up there as I was emptying bags of hardware that were previously just stacked on shelves.

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                            • Originally posted by Arcane View Post
                              You definitely have a lot better calibrated eyeball than I have!
                              Nah, I work with those sizes all the time. I can tell an #8-32 from a #10-24 on sight. Same for the others. A lot of my taps are loose in a draw. I can pick those out too.

                              Added: That metric stuff in another story though.
                              Last edited by CCWKen; 12-27-2018, 01:55 PM. Reason: Addition

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                              • Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                                Nah, I work with those sizes all the time. I can tell an #8-32 from a #10-24 on sight. Same for the others. A lot of my taps are loose in a draw. I can pick those out too.
                                Same here, M3 to M24 I can eyeball correctly about 99.9% of time. M2.5 might need caliper to differentiate from M2 and M3.
                                Metric fine threads are also usually quite obvious but those I have to measure if they are "extra fine" or just fine.

                                You can tell also solid carbide drills or endmills from HSS drills/mills without even thinking about it, solid carbide feels way too heavy in your hand.

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