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  • Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
    Perhaps you can use a part number code that can be entered into a database that you can search. For my electronic parts, I use a prefix based on standard reference designations, such as R for resistors and C for capacitors. Then I add the parametric attributes. ...
    Here's a better way... seriously. Resistors or caps in drawer cabinets? No. Likely under 10% space utilisation and oh so frustrating.

    Get a bin, with a lid, something shoe-box sized or so. Then go buy a box of manilla envelopes that fit nicely, vertically, in said bins. Office supply stores sells all kinds of sizes for these envelopes. Put each type of part in an envelope and write what it is on the outside. R value, type, etc... As much or as little information as you want. Then, put them in the bin alphabetically. Get a new type, another envelope to stuff in where it belongs. Just a pen, no label maker required. No endless sorting of drawers. No putting 2 types in one drawer because you've run out. If you have too many of one type to fit in a single envelope... so what, use 2, or more. Easy to leaf through and find what you want, and you can pack the bin pretty much full before moving to a second one. When you move on to that second one it's easy to re-sort... say pulling out all the high wattage or whatever to the new bin. Oh, and when you knock the bin over... worst case, you have to re-alphabetise the bin. Dump a drawer cabinet over... ug!

    No database required, unless you want.

    Resistors, caps, diodes, LEDs, transistors, whatever... each gets an envelope and goes in the relevant bin. It works well. The only issue, and it's minor, is that the glue on the envelope flap can sometimes seal and have to be peeled open again. Might even need a new envelope... might waste $0.20.

    I don't know that it would work particularly well for stuff you need to see rather than read. I very rarely measure how long a screw has to be... it just has to be "that" eyeball long. Much easier to just open a lid and scan, especially if the part it's going through is in your hand.

    David...
    http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

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    • I have most of my SMT components in coin envelopes, stored in old library card file drawers:





      Some parts that I used for my Ortmaster PCBs are stored in plastic bins, with labels that were generated and printed from BOMs. The same labels are used for kits that I supplied to the PCB assembly house (AAPCB.com).


      My Mentor Graphics PADS software has a database of parts that I use to populate the schematic, and includes parts decals that are transferred to the PCB for routing. There is a script that generates the BOM as well as an XYRS file (X and Y coordinates, Rotation, and Side).
      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
      USA Maryland 21030

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      • I'm very happy with my electronics lab. I keep all of my components in storage bins.. I double stacked two images in each image







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        • And the rest of my bins in my electronics lab:



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          • Now that's organized. . And they can't get knocked off. Good job

            It looks like you go to a lot of auctions. I hope you use a lot of the stuff in your bins..

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            • Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
              I have most of my SMT components in coin envelopes, stored in old library card file drawers:..
              So... if you've already discovered that drawer cabinets are not a good way to store electronic components... why the advice to use a database, which I presumed to be a way to cross-reference location in drawer cabinets? Maybe I misunderstood?

              You obviously agree that these envelopes, with notes on the outside, are the highest density storage possible, at least not involving lossy compression

              But, it's a bit cheating to recommend a database to track parts location when your PADs software is using a database for a lot more. I mean, I'm weird enough that I actually find sorting nuts and bolts rather soothing... and I happen to think database design is rather fun, but I've no intention of tracking said bolts in said database. I'm not that weird

              David...
              http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

              Comment


              • Originally posted by 754 View Post
                Now that's organized. . And they can't get knocked off. Good job

                It looks like you go to a lot of auctions. I hope you use a lot of the stuff in your bins..
                I bought all of my electronic components new from various suppliers. I only go to machine tool auctions.

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                • 2PL's bins are the way to go for electronic stuff. it fits in, and it is in-scale with the drawers.

                  I'm not crazy about the clear drawers he is using, I see ICs in them without antistatic foam. I use grounded case antistatic drawer sets. Then I do not need to fiddle with foam or tubes.
                  4357 2773 5647 3671 3645 0087 1276

                  CNC machines only go through the motions

                  "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

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                  • Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
                    I bought all of my electronic components new from various suppliers. I only go to machine tool auctions.
                    Yeah I meant the vast amount and variety of non electric that looks like it comes from auctions. How much of it can you use ?

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                    • Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
                      And the rest of my bins in my electronics lab:...
                      Okay... you have your own issues But, humour me here... what happens when you get another IRF device? Where does it go? Do you spend an hour rearranging all those bins so that it ends up near the other IRF components?

                      As I've said, I've been there, done that... not quite the collection you have, but the same approach. It didn't work for me.

                      And, you do realise that the photos Paul posted likely show significantly more stuff in a lot less space, right? Certainly doesn't look as pretty, but I bet he can find stuff as fast or faster than you.

                      And, besides all that, when are you going to throw out those Z80 CPUs? Even I threw out the pile I had (though I'll admit to still keeping the Eproms). And, yeah, I picked up some of those breadboard power-supplies too. I have no idea why.

                      But, apparently, I don't have that big an issue with hording.

                      David...
                      http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

                      Comment


                      • We had a guy here in dealt in transistors, I believe it was.
                        20 pages of inventory, very fine print.. Lake City Technical
                        He passed away in the last year or so, wonder what will happen to his stuff . He had some nice machining equipment , a beauty turret punch, lathe, brake etc..
                        I built a bit of stuff for him, one of the many things he made was a hardness tester for Apple's with SPC. Sensors for the walls of open pit mines, to detect movement.... many cool things.
                        His nickname was Kilowatt..

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                        • Originally posted by 754 View Post
                          Yeah I meant the vast amount and variety of non electric that looks like it comes from auctions. How much of it can you use ?
                          I do buy lots of Jameco grab bags. Lots of good stuff that you'll never know you need until you do. Switch grab bags, connector grab bags, etc. I'm also teaching my Son electronics and he also likes to have access to all kinds of things.

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                          • Originally posted by fixerdave View Post
                            Okay... you have your own issues But, humour me here... what happens when you get another IRF device? Where does it go? Do you spend an hour rearranging all those bins so that it ends up near the other IRF components?

                            As I've said, I've been there, done that... not quite the collection you have, but the same approach. It didn't work for me.

                            And, you do realise that the photos Paul posted likely show significantly more stuff in a lot less space, right? Certainly doesn't look as pretty, but I bet he can find stuff as fast or faster than you.

                            And, besides all that, when are you going to throw out those Z80 CPUs? Even I threw out the pile I had (though I'll admit to still keeping the Eproms). And, yeah, I picked up some of those breadboard power-supplies too. I have no idea why.

                            But, apparently, I don't have that big an issue with hording.

                            David...

                            I've been building my electronics lab since I was a kid. I might wire up a Z80 or 6502 with my son so I keep everything.

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                            • One thing about having too much stuff in my machine shop.
                              Often it was easier and quicker to make the thing I needed on manual equipment, than to look for it.
                              After a while the stuff can start owning you...

                              Finally in 2015 I shut it down. 35 days straight of moving. And i had help...Then another 2 weeks 11days later and I still got stuff in storage and nowhere to work.

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                              • Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
                                I've been building my electronics lab since I was a kid. I might wire up a Z80 or 6502 with my son so I keep everything.
                                Well... I suppose wire-wrapping up a single-board 8-bit computer is kind of like machining a steam engine.

                                Maybe it's because my early career was based on the former... but I'd never put my kid through that I'll be happy if I get him into Arduinos, or whatever replaces them, in the next few years. He had fun with the automated railway crossing a few months back. Just a servo and a proximity sensor. Some flashing LEDs. Maybe I'll add a mechanical bell with a solenoid to spark that back up.

                                Any luck with your kid so far? How old? Mine's 8 now, and it's still mostly "meh".

                                And, sorry, I ditched most of my wire-wrap sockets or I'd have mailed them to you. Oh, by 'ditched', I mean I put them in the free-pile at work so the Electronics students can take them... and store them, and move them, and sort them for the next 30 years. Had one student come in asking if I had any 'old' computer components. I loaded him up. He came back the next day all sheepish... said his girlfriend said he couldn't keep them. Lucky guy, I needed a girl like that back then.

                                David...
                                http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

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