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  • I lived in Hillsdale, Ontario for a few years. The kids bedrooms were on the main floor, and wife and I had a bedroom downstairs. The bedroom had a "dropped ceiling" in it. In one spot over the bed, someone had removed a light fixture and left a hole. One Sunday morning, big black hornets began dropping thru the hole onto the bed. That gets your attention real quick. Wife and I escaped to another room with no stings. I couldn't afford an exterminator, so I dressed up in my "bee proof" clothes, ---three pair of pants, three shirts, a ballcap and leather welding gloves. Went in and stood on the bed and started removing ceiling tiles---very cautiously. The floor joist above the foundation sill plate had warped and left a 1/2" crack about six feet long that the bees were coming in thru. The bees had a big nest somewhere inside the outer wall of the house. I went up to my garage and found a big tub of premixed drywall mud. Took it and a trowel down and plugged the crack full of drywall mud. The mud hardened, the crack was sealed, and that was the end of the bee problem. That was twenty five years ago, and for all I know the bees still may be nesting in the outer wall of that house.
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

    Comment


    • This time of the year is when I battle Yellow Jackets/Paper Wasps on a daily basis. Those rascals will build a nest anywhere--Even on the face of a door, if it's under cover. Every time I head for one of the tractors or lawnmower, I carry a can of wasp spray and give the machine a good inspection. It only takes those wasps three days to build about a square inch of nest and have 2-3 wasps on it. And they're not always up high. I've come close to hitting nests while mowing around a mesquite shrub and the nests are about a foot off the ground hidden by high grass. And they're smart too. I had one "tattoo" the length of my ring finger while holding a can of wasp spray.

      Comment


      • It's 108 degrees today, so we did very little. We did see a show about the "Coravin" wine serving and sealing system. For only $291 and tax you can pour a glass of your favorite wine without any trace of oxygen getting inside as you re cork it. It works by piercing the cork with a needle resembling a hypodermic. It fills the bottle with argon from a small canister as it dispenses the wine. The argon canisters are $9 apiece. I was interested because my Dr has asked me to quit drinking totally, but occasionally I'd like a good glass of wine with dinner.

        After determining that I was NOT going to pay around $300 just to keep a bottle of wine fresh, I poured a glass of a really nice pinot noir (Velvet Fog, 2017) and then went to the garage. I came up with an Idea and used the following TIG settings;

        Amps 10. DCEN. Pulse off. Postflow 10 seconds. Argon set to 30 Cu Ft per hour. #5 cup. After purging the lines I arranged my work.

        In other words I squirted 10 seconds of pure argon into the bottle and resealed it.
        At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

        Location: SF East Bay.

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        • Been rebuilding a lot of commercial chainsaws lately, mostly big Huskies for some of the guys I know that are in the biz. I rebuilt a couple of 372 XPs for one fellow a while back and he phoned me up about a week later telling me how happy he was with thee power and performance and would it be ok to give his buddy my number.

          I didn't think too much about it at the time and settled into my regular routine. Was watching a YouTube video one night while still in "saw mode" about a local guy that was hired to mill 30,000 lbs. of walnut burls for a high end rustic furniture builder in Calgary, Alberta. He had a big Husky 3120 XP with a 60in bar that he would use to cut slabs off of the burls which had been kept in storage for years.

          So buddy phones out of the blue saying a friend of his gave him my number and would I like to do a couple of saws for him. Always looking for a little cash, I said I sure wood.

          Now here's the ironic part, in walks buddy a few days later with the red coveralls in the video below that I watched, only a few days before.
          His 385 XP and the big 3120 XP are in my shop now. That sure is one damn big saw, I had to take the bar off right away so that I wouldn't be knocking stuff off of the bench every time I picked it up. LOL

          Milling 30,000 Pounds of Walnut Burl
          Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
          Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

          Location: British Columbia

          Comment


          • More progress on porch roof:



            These GAF Timberline shingles have a weird pattern:


            These are four shingles pulled off the stack in sequence. Note that they are all cut differently:


            The individual tabs are cut random width and even random angles:




            These edges have only very thin slivers of tabs, which doesn't look right at all.


            The instructions are not very helpful, and I even called them and they didn't have much good advice. I will be sending these photos to them.
            Last edited by PStechPaul; 06-12-2019, 07:02 PM.
            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
            Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
            USA Maryland 21030

            Comment


            • They won't have much advice for you because you're overthinking it. Just follow the instructions, it's roofing not rocket science. My roofer buddy used to say 'you just need to be smarter than a drop of water'.

              They're supposed to be like that. I went with IKO Cambridge, much the same. Way better than 3-tabs for appearance and durability, it's all you see on roofs up this way now. The random pattern give a really nice look, and even that thin edge you get sometimes is at least as thick as a 3-tab. Remember, there's a whole 'nother shingle under there and adhesive. The random pattern is a lot more forgiving with cutting as well. Just follow the instructions to get your staggered edge and go to town.
              Cayuga, Ontario, Canada

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Willy View Post
                Been rebuilding a lot of commercial chainsaws lately, mostly big Huskies for some of the guys I know that are in the biz. I rebuilt a couple of 372 XPs for one fellow a while back and he phoned me up about a week later telling me how happy he was with thee power and performance and would it be ok to give his buddy my number.

                I didn't think too much about it at the time and settled into my regular routine. Was watching a YouTube video one night while still in "saw mode" about a local guy that was hired to mill 30,000 lbs. of walnut burls for a high end rustic furniture builder in Calgary, Alberta. He had a big Husky 3120 XP with a 60in bar that he would use to cut slabs off of the burls which had been kept in storage for years.

                So buddy phones out of the blue saying a friend of his gave him my number and would I like to do a couple of saws for him. Always looking for a little cash, I said I sure wood.

                Now here's the ironic part, in walks buddy a few days later with the red coveralls in the video below that I watched, only a few days before.
                His 385 XP and the big 3120 XP are in my shop now. That sure is one damn big saw, I had to take the bar off right away so that I wouldn't be knocking stuff off of the bench every time I picked it up. LOL

                Milling 30,000 Pounds of Walnut Burl
                Wow, that's some nice stuff. Any idea on the value?
                Cayuga, Ontario, Canada

                Comment


                • I do tend to overthink things, and this porch project has expanded to a lot more than I had originally figured. But another problem is that my buddy John tends to be OCD about some things, which is really taking a lot more time than it should. He does not seem to trust the horizontal lines on the roofing felt, so after each course he measures from the wall and seems surprised when it measures within 1/4 inch. He was going to snap chalk lines as well. They will be needed for the side courses, because he did not apply roofing felt separately there as I had wanted. We are both hard-headed so I sometimes have to let him do things as he wants as long as it's not critical.

                  It has taken about 2-3 hours to nail down just four courses on the front. Now it is raining and I'm concerned that water will get under the shingles where the top edge is exposed. I had hoped he would finish the entire front by day's end, but...


                  The problem seems to be that John insists on choking up on the handle of the hammer, and so it takes five or more blows for each nail. He is also farsighted but for some reason won't wear reading glasses so he probably can;t see well enough to hit it accurately. The how-to videos show the roofing job going really quickly once all the starter strips are properly positioned, but they use a nail gun so about 5 seconds per shingle, instead of five minutes

                  I decided I would buy a nail gun, maybe the HF Banks brand for $125 which has better reviews than the $100 Central Pneumatic cheapie. With a 20% coupon I can get it for $100, and if I save 4 hours of time I come out even for the $25/hr I'm paying him. But I found someone on Craigs List in Westminster who is selling an Ingersol-Rand and a Hitachi (one of which needs repair) for $60 total, so I might do that. I will have more roofing to do for a small addition that needs repair, and an 8x12 shed I want to build.

                  Last edited by PStechPaul; 06-12-2019, 11:46 PM. Reason: CL image
                  http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                  Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                  USA Maryland 21030

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post

                    I decided I would buy a nail gun, maybe the HF Banks brand for $125 which has better reviews than the $100 Central Pneumatic cheapie. .
                    I bought one of the banks line to help with some inside framing that I was doing last month. It worked well enough.

                    Dan
                    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                    Location: SF East Bay.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                      ...
                      The problem seems to be that John insists on choking up on the handle of the hammer, and so it takes five or more blows for each nail. ...
                      I decided I would buy a nail gun, ...
                      A no-brainer, as they say. Even if he's OCD about its use, it will still be way, way faster. I regret not buying mine sooner.

                      Mine is a name brand, I forget which, bought used. I would be cautious about a HF one - a nail gun that jams frequently not only slows you way down, but is highly frustrating and annoying
                      Last edited by Bob Engelhardt; 06-13-2019, 08:22 AM.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Tom S View Post
                        Wow, that's some nice stuff. Any idea on the value?
                        I have no idea Tom. I hope to be talking with the saw owner sometime soon as his saw is ready so I'll see if he can give me a sense of value of the milled burls.
                        I'm thinking though that since these beautiful slabs of wood will be processed further into some very nice pieces of furniture aimed at the higher end of the market, it's anyone's guess.
                        It's all about chasing that piece of wood around the wood shop a few more times and adding value.
                        Looking at a few more of the Black Forest Wood Co. videos I see that some of their higher end niche market products are well into the 5 figure price range and are sold and delivered as far away as Texas, maybe further as I haven't watched that many, so value is definitely in the eye of the beholder.

                        The raw cut slabs though do have some value built into them already due the unique properties inherent to them. I'd like to know how they amassed such a large quantity of walnut burls in the first place. I mean holy cow, what a collection!
                        I'd like to say this stuff just doesn't grow on trees, but.....
                        Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                        Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                        Location: British Columbia

                        Comment


                        • Tom, buddy just picked up his big milling saw, the 385 will be in for some major surgery.
                          So getting back to your question on the value of the burls, he said on average about fifty dollars a board foot. Depending on the quality some obviously less, some of the very nice select pieces will be over one hundred dollars a board foot.

                          He told me they have some very picky people spending big coin for just the right piece for use in a guitar as an example example. He mentioned that one of the members of Gun & Roses was there to purchase wood for a guitar he is having built. They were also doing a big furniture job for a client in Qatar at the time ,so some very discriminating buyers.

                          I asked him where the burls came from and he told me somebody in California contacted them about a collection he had that he wanted to sell. They went to have a look and it was a done deal. Those pieces will end up all over the globe when all is said and done.
                          Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                          Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                          Location: British Columbia

                          Comment


                          • Those are some incredible burls they have there. Nice video

                            I've got a couple maples with large burls (~1-2' dia) on them I'm looking forward to milling or turning one day. I've also been planting a bunch of black walnut trees that keep growing in my FIL's garden. The squirrels bury the nuts, and they grow 2-3', then we bring them over to my house and plant them into rows. I think I've got 18 maybe 20 planted so far and would like to try and figure out how to "induce" some figure in them, but leave some growing straight. Mathematically I'll probably never get to do anything with the wood.....but somebody might appreciate them some day. I read that it's damage that causes a burl to grow, and shooting them with a 22 will cause a burl to form in a couple years. Haven't tried it yet as the trees are still to small, but it might be an interesting experiment one day. Others say it's disease that causes them, but it's probably a bit of both depending on the situation and type of burl.

                            I also tried to grow some white cedar into interesting shapes like twisting 3 together to make a growing spiral and other different designs, but none survived. I think I pruned too much, too fast, and cause too much shock to them. I need to try some more this year, as I kinda forgot about them. I want to build a log cabin one day and I think it would be cool to incorporate a bunch of twisted and figured trees that I grew into the deck railing and other parts of the house.

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                            • I figured walnut burls especially that big would carry a hefty price. When watching video I kept thinking all that sawdust....wouldn't it be worth their while to source a thin kerf bandsaw mill?
                              in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                              • There's a guy on you tube I watch, Matt Cremona, who built a very large bandmill specifically for doing work like this. I've also recently discovered another large bandmill around Orangeville, on (I think, going from memory) that specializes in large work like this and big live edge stuff. With the volume they milled, they certainly have a bunch of $$ sitting there in chips from the thicker kerf.....theoretically, but who knows the logistics of it. There might not have been a large enough bandmill within feasible shipping distance, and the chainsaw mill guy might have been working cheap enough that it maths out. The extra effort of trucking them around to a mill to save a couple inches of Kerf just might not have been worth it.

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