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  • Just finished restoring a 100 year old spinning wheel for my wife.

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    • Ok back to the jeep aka “perpetual patina”
      Started working on the hydraulic pump for the 3pt hitch. The prior rubber coupling was destroyed and there is no NOS. My Google food wasn’t working well and I couldn’t really find anything that I could substitute well so I dug through my pile of “treasures.”
      Some sort of tag sale find??? 6 inch sanding disc (I don’t own a tool for this.) The rubber seemed to be a close match. The disc was only certified for 3000 RPM but that is at 6 inches not 4 inches (which I cut it down to.) Once it was cut to 4 inches the thickness seem to be appropriate but I had to place the holes for the coupling to the hydraulic pump and the slots for the crank pulley.

      Will see how it goes. (Old part is one w zip tie holding it together for measurements.)









      "Good judgment comes from experience, and often experience comes from bad judgment" R.M.Brown

      My shop tour www.plastikosmd.com

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      • Today I went to Lowes with the intention of buying 12 sheets of 1/2" OSB for the roof (5 pieces) and walls (7 pieces) of my shed. They were about $9 each, so it would be about $105. I had considered using T1-11 siding, but the seven pieces for the walls would be about $35 each or $245. The sales associate said he did not recommend the OSB and suggested 1/2" CAT rated plywood sheathing at $17.75 each, or about twice the cost of OSB. So, I agreed, and I had them ring them up along with a $30 10 pound container of 1-5/8" construction screws. The total came to $214, which seemed about right, and I made the 2 mile trip home. When I looked at the receipt, I saw that they had rung up 12 pieces of 3/8" sheathing at $14.33 each, and I thought I was going to have to go back to get the 1/2" plywood. But upon measuring and checking the product label, I saw that it was, indeed, the 15/32" (1/2" nominal) sheathing I wanted.

        So, now I wonder if I should go back and pay the $41 difference, or just keep the bargain. If this were Home Depot I would happily accept this as compensation for their unwillingness to take back a partial bundle of shingles - and that was why I now almost exclusively shop at Lowes. It seems odd that it rang up as 3/8", as I would assume they scanned the bar code. Maybe one of the pieces had the wrong label?

        What would you do?
        http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
        Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
        USA Maryland 21030

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        • What would you do?

          Probably wait until the next time I was there and show them the receipt, tell them I owed them $41.

          Most likely they'd say "forget it" because it's a PITA to make corrections, but I'd feel I'd given them the chance.

          -js
          There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

          Location: SF Bay Area

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          • Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post

            What would you do? [/SIZE]❓
            Honestly, I'd bring the receipt and one of the barcode labels with me next time I shop and ask them to make an adjustment. It works well for me.
            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

            Location: SF East Bay.

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            • I think the 1/2" plywood will not be stiff enough for the roof on 24" centers. I found a plywood load specification., which shows load for 1/2" as 60, 90, and 120 PSI, and for 3/4" it is 141, 211, and 282. On 16" centers 1/2" will support 197, 295, and 398 PSI. So I will probably return 5 pieces and get 3/4" (23/32") instead. They have two kinds, one (probably CDX) for $23.78 and another (BCX) for $29.98.
              http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
              Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
              USA Maryland 21030

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              • Today I got the rest of my security cams set up. Well, the first batch at least. I found after a lot of poking around that cheap cameras are a real hassle if you are doing anything other than using them exactly as designed. One camera worked, but would not pan and tilt properly when suspended upside down. Another refused to attach to the wifi router until i changed the name to just letters.

                After getting the cameras online, I realized that my main wifi router was overloading. Dozens of IOT devices for home automation combined with lots of audio/video toys resulted in dropped packets when just pinging the router from an attached PC. Ordered two new wifi routers that ar a bit beefier.

                And last but not least... I dropped a phone handset behind the end table. When I picked it up I noticed that a spare wifi router was still sitting a few inches from my SmartThings hub. I'd placed it there for testing last year and never got around to turning it off an putting it away. That may explain why I occasionally get dropped Zwave devices.

                Oh.. The wife and I went out for a nice steak dinner to celebrate 30 years together.
                At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                Location: SF East Bay.

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                • Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                  I think the 1/2" plywood will not be stiff enough for the roof on 24" centers. I found a plywood load specification., which shows load for 1/2" as 60, 90, and 120 PSI, and for 3/4" it is 141, 211, and 282. On 16" centers 1/2" will support 197, 295, and 398 PSI. So I will probably return 5 pieces and get 3/4" (23/32") instead. They have two kinds, one (probably CDX) for $23.78 and another (BCX) for $29.98.
                  They do make "H" clips that help provide structural support and reduce deflection when using 1/2" plywood. H clip explanation here. For what it is worth, when using a single top plate it is better, if possible, to place the trusses over the studs for weight transfer. Good luck with the shed project.

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                  • Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                    I think the 1/2" plywood will not be stiff enough for the roof on 24" centers. I found a plywood load specification., which shows load for 1/2" as 60, 90, and 120 PSI, and for 3/4" it is 141, 211, and 282. On 16" centers 1/2" will support 197, 295, and 398 PSI. So I will probably return 5 pieces and get 3/4" (23/32") instead. They have two kinds, one (probably CDX) for $23.78 and another (BCX) for $29.98.
                    I built a gable roof over the front porch about 20 years ago. The code called for 1/2" OSB with H clips. The clips make a world of a difference. No need for 3/4"
                    Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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                    • made lemonade out of lemons by turning my broken but sharp bandsaw blade into several hacksaw blades. Made me feel better about being a dumbazz and breaking the thing.

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                      • I have some H-clips from a previous flooring job, but the roof will have four 41" x 8 foot panels and four 41" x 4 foot panels, which meet at 45 degree angles due to the gambrel design. So they will meet lengthwise on 2x4 rafters, The 1/2" plywood probably would work for the roof, especially the steep sides, which will have no snow load and are not walkable. I could probably get away with just 3/4" on the flatter top panels, or possibly gluing two 1/2" panels together. But I think I'll get the 3/4" and be confident. Also, the shed is located under my huge sycamore which sometimes drops limbs, so extra strength may be needed. I'll probably install flashing on the horizontal joints, also.
                        http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                        Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                        USA Maryland 21030

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                        • Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                          I have some H-clips from a previous flooring job, but the roof will have four 41" x 8 foot panels and four 41" x 4 foot panels, which meet at 45 degree angles due to the gambrel design. So they will meet lengthwise on 2x4 rafters, The 1/2" plywood probably would work for the roof, especially the steep sides, which will have no snow load and are not walkable. I could probably get away with just 3/4" on the flatter top panels, or possibly gluing two 1/2" panels together. But I think I'll get the 3/4" and be confident. Also, the shed is located under my huge sycamore which sometimes drops limbs, so extra strength may be needed. I'll probably install flashing on the horizontal joints, also.
                          I don't design trusses. However, I would guess that the weight of the sheathing is factored into the loading on the trusses. Assuming I guessed correctly, using 3/4" instead of 1/2" OSB would actually decrease the amount of additional weight (snow, bird droppings, volcanic ash, etc.) the roof system could tolerate. I'm sure it won't make any difference on your shed.
                          Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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                          • How big a board was offered at $9? Wood seems to be so cheap in the USA.Have you checked the sixe of the ones you got cheap?
                            Couple of years ago building our Men's Shed we got a load of boards cheap and then found they were all 47in not 48 so the merchant had been offloading them hoping people wouldn't notice. We just put in a load of extra noggins but if they had just told us in advance we would have designed to fit and happily taken more of his problem stock.
                            Looking forward to pictures for the next stage as I might alter my own plans to a Dutch Barn if it looks good.

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                            • Regarding the shed. If more strength is needed I would just get some 2 x 4's and make some blocking for between the trusses. If some blocking was run between the trusses at the joint in the gambrel rafters this would make the plywood joint there solid too.

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                              • Originally posted by Ridgerunner View Post
                                Regarding the shed. If more strength is needed I would just get some 2 x 4's and make some blocking for between the trusses. If some blocking was run between the trusses at the joint in the gambrel rafters this would make the plywood joint there solid too.
                                Yup. This is a great idea.
                                I cut it off twice; it's still too short
                                Oregon, USA

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