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  • Finished setting up a third EMCO Compact 5 CNC lathe. Three of them have come up on the market in the last six months for absurdly low prices.

    Yes they are "training" lathes but with the turret attachment and some previous experience they make great light-duty production machines for plastic, aluminum and stuff of that nature.

    With this latest haul I have enough working boards and software copies on hand to keep the Ancient Technology running for awhile, if not "forever."

    On the fence about upgrading them, if these jobs prove to be long-haul long term prospects a proper modern Turning Center is a better investment.

    But for now, for the stuff I do, they work great and I can brag about owning three CNC turret-lathes.

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    • Chris
      I did not take a lot of pictures of it assembled. It is just a dirty set of gears ect. Now it is a pile of parts waiting for polishing as well a few of the bushings need to be replaced. If the stars align, I will take some pictures as it progresses.
      Pete

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      • Originally posted by Mr Fixit View Post
        Stepside, we have GOT to have pictures. I think you need to start a post on this, it sound truly fascinating.

        TX
        Mr fixit for the family
        Chris
        Yes! Needs it's own thread!
        I cut it off twice; it's still too short
        Oregon, USA

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        • Picked up my wife after a three day hospital visit. Machined a split collar so I could pull a splned arm off the shaft. This is part of the steering system of a 40 plus years old limited hydroplane. The parts and the Hydro have been n a shed untouche for at least 30 years.

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          • A neighbor was giving away a large pile of concrete pavers, so over the past few days John and I loaded them about 50-60 at a time in my Honda Fit, and unloaded them at my house. Probably close to 400 pavers, a good ton total:

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            I may use some of them for steps around the side of the house. Tibbs has been having trouble climbing the stairs in the house, but he was able to get around the back using these rough steps I cut into the dirt.
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            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
            Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
            USA Maryland 21030

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            • Today I closed on my childhood family home. My mom passed away last summer and I am in charge of the estate. Kind of bittersweet selling a place that has been part of our family since 1963 but the time was here. The good news is that in all those years the area has been built up quite a bit and it brought a real good price. Glad to have that part of settling the estate over with. Even with using a realtor I probably spent a good 100 hours making repairs and doing other things that needed to be done to sell the place.
              OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

              THINK HARDER

              BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

              MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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              • [QUOTE=bborr01;n1858649]Today I closed on my childhood family home. My mom passed away last summer and I am in charge of the estate.

                I did the same thing in 2014.... Mom passed away at 98 and hadn't lived there for 3 years. Refused to consider any idea of clearing it out, fixing it up, or anything else. She said that Dad built it exactly perfect and it needed nothing. This was also in 1963. Well, it was all original except the living room was repainted once in the middle 1980's The outside wasn't bad, but I wish that I had spent only 100 hours dealing with the interior.
                I cut it off twice; it's still too short
                Oregon, USA

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                • Finished by house number sign. Made out of 1/8" acrylic for the base and 3/8" aluminum plate for the numbers. At the 2 o'clock position you can see where I welded the saw kerf closed so I could band saw the inside of the zero.
                  Attached Files

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                  • Originally posted by Tungsten dipper View Post
                    Finished by house number sign. Made out of 1/8" acrylic for the base and 3/8" aluminum plate for the numbers. At the 2 o'clock position you can see where I welded the saw kerf closed so I could band saw the inside of the zero.
                    How did you lay out the design? Templates? CAD? Looks sharp, I like it!
                    I cut it off twice; it's still too short
                    Oregon, USA

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                    • So far today I have made... two cups of coffee.
                      *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                      • Originally posted by Tim Clarke View Post

                        How did you lay out the design? Templates? CAD? Looks sharp, I like it!
                        Thanks!
                        I used Photoshop, printed it to size then traced it on masonite, and the 3/8" aluminum plate. The typeface is American Typewriter. I first cut out 1/8 masonite templates of the numbers, to locate the mounting holes for the sign base and then for the plate to fly cut the face of the numbers in the mill vise. They where all cut with the vertical metal bandsaw, then finished with a belt sanders and hand files. No CNCs for me; I did it the old fashion way.

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                        • Originally posted by Tungsten dipper View Post

                          Thanks!
                          I used Photoshop, printed it to size then traced it on masonite, and the 3/8" aluminum plate. The typeface is American Typewriter. I first cut out 1/8 masonite templates of the numbers, to locate the mounting holes for the sign base and then for the plate to fly cut the face of the numbers in the mill vise. They where all cut with the vertical metal bandsaw, then finished with a belt sanders and hand files. No CNCs for me; I did it the old fashion way.
                          Thanks for the reply. I made some circa 1984 from wood, about 1 1/2" thick. I no longer live there, but the numbers are still there. Wish I could find the templates I used, but it looks like they're long gone.
                          I cut it off twice; it's still too short
                          Oregon, USA

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                          • Time to start making the top link part that was missing from my Stratton lift. Copying some pics on the internet, I needed some 3/8 plate and channel.

                            Hit the scrapyard and found a 4” channel that was 8 ft long or a piece of 3” with some tabs welded in. Couldn’t bring myself to cut up the beautiful 4 inch piece so out came the torch and a grinder and an hour of wasted time to make a beautiful piece of 3 inch channel. (I have an issue hoarding steel, I always will tend to make do with the smallest possible junk piece so I can save the bigger pieces for that future project that never seems to come around LOL)





                            After drilling the mount holes, The next step is to mock up the top link bracket which Hass to be at an angle so that the tailgate can still be removed. Note, helper 2x4 to hold the tailgate at release point.

                            "Good judgment comes from experience, and often experience comes from bad judgment" R.M.Brown

                            My shop tour www.plastikosmd.com

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                            • More scrap, I cut a piece off those 3/8 plate and tacked it back to itself so I could double it up, marked out the piece that was needed and use the plasma to cut both pieces at once.



                              Trial fit, tailgate slides out nicely. By no means a professional fabricator but it turned out well thus far. Next to drill the through holes for mounting and weld it in place
                              "Good judgment comes from experience, and often experience comes from bad judgment" R.M.Brown

                              My shop tour www.plastikosmd.com

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                              • Finally got my cylinder square done to my satisfaction at this point in time. Less than .0001" in 5 inches from the surface plate. Worst case scenario, that works out to 4 seconds of arc. Now I have to find some appropriate wood and make a box for it. Total investment less than $40 including abrasives and the cylinder itself. I started another thread about it here:
                                https://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/fo...e-close-enough
                                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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