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  • yesterday I gave a lecture, prepared another one, went for a ride, found a nice piece of steel (1 3/4"!), got a puncture, remembered I'd left my pump and tube at home (in work bag), got a lift from the wife, did a bunch of errands and then prepared another lecture. Busy day!
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    as for my experience with mold - once you get it you never really get rid of it. Paul, that second house of yours sounds like a decaying money pit you can ill afford.

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    • I think the quality of the cut improved a lot when I got the burr removed from the taper:

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      • Today, early today that is, I finished drilling four 1.25" holes in some slide pulls that I am making for the lower shelves of a new workbench. I had a disaster the first time I tried with a hole saw and would up with a broken drill bit in the hole saw and the pull that was made of 1/8" steel wound up spinning round and round on my drill press spindle. Thank heavens my hands were mostly out of the way. Yea, I know, safety first.

        So I had to buy some new pilot bits. Ace had them. This time I used three clamps from my 1/2" set: one to hold the wood backing, one to hold the pull being drilled, and one more for safety. The job went fast and easy after I did it the right way.

        In the past most, if not all of my use of hole saws was in hand held drills and was without any injury. But there were mishaps and I should have known to take more precautions when I tried this on my drill press.

        On the bright side I think I can say that using hole saws on steel can be safer on the drill press instead of with a hand held drill, IF you take the time to do it right. Lesson learned. I hope for life.
        Paul A.
        SE Texas

        Make it fit.
        You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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        • Taking it easy today - a bit worn out from yesterday's efforts. A few points of clarification:

          1. The original floors in both houses were dirt. The concrete I added only extends about 3 feet from the rear wall, and maybe 6-8 feet in width. I put felt expansion joints along the edges.

          2. There is about 2" space between the bottoms of the PT joists and the concrete. The floor is all dirt from that point to the front of the house, about 10 feet. IIRC I jammed concrete blocks and shims under the logs for support.

          3. Years ago, I dug a ditch about 2 feet deep along the back of the house, laid a few inches of gravel, and some porous 4" drains, which I connected to downspouts on each side of the rear. But the gutters have been clogged with leaves and haven't worked very well. Also, there is a crack in the rear wall near the corner.

          4. The "contractor" installed fiberglass insulation between the stud wall and the rock wall (which is actually brick on the top half). It would have been better to have allowed air circulation, and perhaps install a vapor barrier on the back of the studs instead,

          5. The drywall does seem to be the "green-board" type which uses a mold-resistant synthetic "paper", but I suppose there are limits to its effectiveness. I will probably just remove more of the bottom section and replace it with treated plywood or similar material more resistant to water.

          At nearly 71 years of age, I only need to come up with a solution that will be workable for 10-20 years or so. Then it will be someone else's problem. There is only so much I can do and I don't have lots of money to invest. The value of my 3 properties, with two houses on a total of 2-1/2 acres, is mostly in the land. The meadow at the top of the hill is an ideal building site, except for the rather long, steep access road. The existing houses may have some historical value, but are not protected as such.

          Some videos of the work I have done, mostly on the house where I am actually living (713):



          Part 2:
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YlQgyPw4Seo

          Part 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7G1KrogqShQ

          More: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wYWs4751Tw
          http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
          Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
          USA Maryland 21030

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          • Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
            .......

            1. The original floors in both houses were dirt. The concrete I added only extends about 3 feet from the rear wall, and maybe 6-8 feet in width. I put felt expansion joints along the edges.

            2. There is about 2" space between the bottoms of the PT joists and the concrete. The floor is all dirt from that point to the front of the house, about 10 feet. IIRC I jammed concrete blocks and shims under the logs for support.

            ..........
            Ok, Get some plastic under there.

            Concrete lets some moisture through, dirt lets impossible amounts through. It's probably really damp under that when closed up. Cover the dirt to keep it down to a dull roar.....
            1601

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

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            • I went for a bike ride and studying the 777

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              • Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                Today, early today that is, I finished drilling four 1.25" holes in some slide pulls that I am making for the lower shelves of a new workbench. I had a disaster the first time I tried with a hole saw and would up with a broken drill bit in the hole saw and the pull that was made of 1/8" steel wound up spinning round and round on my drill press spindle. Thank heavens my hands were mostly out of the way. Yea, I know, safety first.

                So I had to buy some new pilot bits. Ace had them. This time I used three clamps from my 1/2" set: one to hold the wood backing, one to hold the pull being drilled, and one more for safety. The job went fast and easy after I did it the right way.

                In the past most, if not all of my use of hole saws was in hand held drills and was without any injury. But there were mishaps and I should have known to take more precautions when I tried this on my drill press.

                On the bright side I think I can say that using hole saws on steel can be safer on the drill press instead of with a hand held drill, IF you take the time to do it right. Lesson learned. I hope for life.
                Paul I've had great success by not using a pilot drill with holes saws,drill pilot hole first then holesaw with a smooth 1/4" shaft to keep consistent hole size.

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                • The creation of a home made autoclave.

                  As you may have heard, there is a corona virus scare going on. We've stayed indoors for a couple of weeks and have a few more to go. I realized the only "unclean" items we run into daily is the mail. A bit of research shows that the virus dies after a period of dry 140F or higher air. Hmmmm. They sell "shoe drying racks" for clothes dryers. Mine does not have one, but it has the dimples in the back of the drum for the rack to wedge into and a ledge just inside the door for feet to rest upon. Hmmmmmmm.

                  The rack is a spare from a neighbor's oven. It's too big in the long axis. Just right on the narrow one. It also has a couple things hanging off that are not needed.

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                  You can see the dimples in the back wall that the rack should fit into. All I have to do is cut it down, make some feet on both ends and all will be well. So I take it out back and clamp it into the vice of my miniature welding table. I used a couple of bricks which played 1-2-3 blocks to stabilize it while I attacked it with my trusty Harbor Freight hand held band saw. It cut like butter, but that's to be expected of a bimetal blade and cheap steel racks. That saw is the best $69 purchase I ever made.

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                  Where was I... Oh yeah. After cutting off the end, I welded a couple of 2 inch long rods in the location where the dimples are. It was a bit breezy so I used .035 flux core MIG in a Lincoln SP100 welder. Then I welded a couple of 3 inch long support legs for the other end. The vinyl tubing was my answer to "How do I spring load this?" as well as "How do I keep from scratching the enamel?" It worked like a charm. A little off center in the picture, but easily corrected.

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                  And, of course, the proof is in the pudding. You can see that the drum's vanes miss the rack by a generous margin. As you can see, it fits like a glove. An old, well worn glove that was custom tailored to your hand, then lovingly cared for over the years. To put it more simply.... See? It fits!

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                  The IR thermometer shows that my dryer easily reached about 160F while my mail rested on the rack. After 20 minutes I pronounced it cured and presented the still warm stack of mail to my wife.

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                  Tomorrow I will cut 3/4 of an inch off the near end and weld on new legs. I forgot that the door has a panel that protrudes 1/2 inch into the door frame.

                  Dan
                  Last edited by danlb; 04-02-2020, 03:36 AM.
                  At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                  Location: SF East Bay.

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                  • Dan,
                    That's pretty cleaver! I just tumble dry my mail.
                    You know that would be good to dry tennis shoes, warm up coffee, dry the cat.......

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                    • Originally posted by Tungsten dipper View Post
                      ..., dry the cat.......
                      And if you do that, be sure to get a video

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                      • Built a Lazy Kate for my wife's spinning wheel. This is used pull off already spun yarn to make either 2 or 3 ply yarns. You can see the tension cord that keeps the spools from free wheeling. I now have to disassemble it to put on the final coat of finish.
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                        • Sausage Extruder 3000:
                          https://imgur.com/a/sJRUxZH

                          all parts are stainless steel or polyethylene and diswasher safe

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                          • Looking good, what kind of sausage do you make?

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                            • Originally posted by Tungsten dipper View Post
                              Looking good, what kind of sausage do you make?
                              Spicy Northern Thailand style ”sai ua” sausages

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                              • Originally posted by Tungsten dipper View Post
                                Built a Lazy Kate for my wife's spinning wheel. This is used pull off already spun yarn to make either 2 or 3 ply yarns. You can see the tension cord that keeps the spools from free wheeling. I now have to disassemble it to put on the final coat of finish.
                                That looks great, nice job. My wife has been bugging me to make her a lazy kate for a while now. It would be a full time job keeping up with all the yarn equipment she wants me to make for her lol

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