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  • [QUOTE=DennisCA;n1897663]Got quite a lot done this weekend.

    I made a new shaft for my latest axe (the longest one)








    Very Nice job on Handles those remind me of the Viking style Axes.Are you related to Ragnor Lothbrock from way back.

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    • so far my home made head gaskets are holding... (at that rpm - it barely gets warm...)

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      • Not much, tricked Fusion CAM into doing a facing operation without going too far out to the sides and crashing. Decked my spoilboard flat. The day before I cut the counter bore holes in the spoilboard using the router.
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        • Coincidence that you shouls post pictures of axes as I was splitting some logs today. I have a chainsaw to cut and a maul or wedge to split. Do you really still use an axe for cutting wood? I do have a little chopper for splitting short ends of building timber for kindling but that only when I can't find my butcher's cleaver.

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          • I needed to cut slots through some PVC pipe today, so that I could fit the pipe as a protector over the edge of some rabbit wire that sits over the deepest spot in the garden pond. The 'coons like to knock plant pots over and down into that area, so I block it, and it keeps the coons away from the fish, too, so long as the fish have the sense to go there. Had to replace the wire, the old piece was corroded to bits.

            Should have taken a pic.... I needed to do a few long pieces, and with a single t-slot the options for a hold-down are limited.

            So I put a slotting saw on an arbor, set to 40 RPM, and hand fed the pieces against the saw, and through. I clamped a c-clamp with the bow of the clamp across the bed as a hold-down guide, because the mill wanted to lift up the pipe as well as push it back out. Fed by hand, and got it done. Had to push a bit hard when getting it started, but it worked. For once I was stronger than the machine, or at least the workpiece........
            1601 2137 5683 1002 1437

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

            If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

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            • Had to pop into work this morning to restart a cavity finishing program because the power went out the other night. Got extremely lucky as the Z drops a few though when the power goes out, and it was during a rapid move so it was off the part. Had the kids with me so they got to see what dad does all day. Son is starting to ask a bunch of questions about the machines.....Daughter still just wants to push the green button to make it go and spin around in my chair....

              Also had some turning to do tonight, and decided while I was out in the garage to melt some scrap aluminum casting into ingots. Halfway through my second melt, while coming to the end of boring a 12mm id hole the lights went out. Pitch black. Guess the garage breaker finally had enough. Made my way out in the dark, reset the breaker and finished the melt. Decided to do some tig practice instead (different breaker) until I finished that melt, then hop back on the lathe.

              Then spent some time cleaning up all the 5 minute projects I never seem to get to.
              Last edited by Dan Dubeau; 09-08-2020, 12:20 AM.

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              • Laid the 2nd half of laminate flooring in a kitchen. I know all the tricks but it's still tedious. Costco's current laminate is not as good as they used to carry. I can tell by the fact it doesn't dull a jigsaw blade the way the old stuff did with it's thick silica wear layer. But it's cheap, 10mm, and supposedly mildly water resistant. It's a rental, so I will certainly see! I have units with the old stuff from as far back as 2003 that still look great.
                Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                • Today I tried to harvest a couple collared dove with my .25 PCP rifle. I was pleasantly surprised to see the air pressure was still around 3000 PSI (full charge) even though I have not used it in well over a year. Sadly it wouldn't shoot worth a darn, and when I turned it earthwards the pellets just fell out of the gun. After much pulling of hair, shaking of fists, and rending of fabric I realized I had grabbed a tin of .22 pellets instead of .25 pellets.
                  *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                  • Been awhile since I've broken brush, but today was the day to hit the river and walk the banks. I had to cross a swampy back water area, then fight my way through the overgrowth to reach the river. Needles to say there was no-one else there. One foot went in on the way over, and both feet went in on the way back across the swamp. You couldn't see ground, you just had to hope there was some there high enough to step on. Beautiful day, nice to sit on the rocks in the middle of the river for a while.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • I didn't realize you could hunt and eat doves, but apparently they are numerous and it's OK to "harvest" them.

                      https://honest-food.net/wild-game/dove-pigeon-recipes/
                      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                      USA Maryland 21030

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                      • Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                        Had to pop into work this morning to restart a cavity finishing program because the power went out the other night. Got extremely lucky as the Z drops a few though when the power goes out, and it was during a rapid move so it was off the part. Had the kids with me so they got to see what dad does all day. Son is starting to ask a bunch of questions about the machines.....Daughter still just wants to push the green button to make it go and spin around in my chair....

                        Also had some turning to do tonight, and decided while I was out in the garage to melt some scrap aluminum casting into ingots. Halfway through my second melt, while coming to the end of boring a 12mm id hole the lights went out. Pitch black. Guess the garage breaker finally had enough. Made my way out in the dark, reset the breaker and finished the melt. Decided to do some tig practice instead (different breaker) until I finished that melt, then hop back on the lathe.

                        Then spent some time cleaning up all the 5 minute projects I never seem to get to.
                        These bulbs might be just the ticket for such power outages.

                        https://www.brightlivingbulbs.com/co...31489475641416
                        Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                        • Originally posted by Baz View Post
                          Coincidence that you shouls post pictures of axes as I was splitting some logs today. I have a chainsaw to cut and a maul or wedge to split. Do you really still use an axe for cutting wood? I do have a little chopper for splitting short ends of building timber for kindling but that only when I can't find my butcher's cleaver.
                          Yeah I prefer to use the axe. It's fun. I have a Gränsfors splitting maul but it doesn't get much use nowadays because believe it or not the middle sized axe splits firewood almost as well as the much heavier maul does. It's much nicer to heft and swing. The birch handles also help, compared ot hickory they ar emore flexible and don't tranfser shock back into your hands. Birch is less durable, but that's why the axes have got the collars.

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                          • Originally posted by Arcane View Post

                            These bulbs might be just the ticket for such power outages.

                            https://www.brightlivingbulbs.com/co...31489475641416
                            Thanks, Didn't know such a thing existed. I only have one edison bulb in the garage, the rest are tubes. But it wouldn't be a bad thing to have in a couple areas of the house though. The breaker trips used to happen regularly with my old 120v mig welder. I could only weld about 3/4-1" at a time before pausing. Since upgrading to a 240v mig, all my welders are separate from the main garage circuit now so this is the first time I've tripped it. I should run another circuit out there one of these days......

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                            • Originally posted by Arcane View Post

                              These bulbs might be just the ticket for such power outages.

                              https://www.brightlivingbulbs.com/co...31489475641416
                              I once had a position that had me spending a bit of time at work auditing the "emergency preparedness" implementation. That covered everything from protecting people to emergency lighting. Naturally, when I got home I realized that having a flashlight in my pocket and on nearly every table was not enough**. I picked up some emergency battery backed lights and installed them in the bedroom, living room and garage.

                              Within a week we had the first outage in the middle of the night. The beeping of the UPS would normally wake us, but there was no need to listen because the bedroom was flooded with the equivalent of 3 flood lights. The wife wanted it turned off NOW. The only problem was that the switch was on the top and I'd mounted it as close to the ceiling as possible. I had to get the ladder, remove the light and then turn it off.

                              I eventually tossed the emergency lights in the recycle bin. It's been 20 years and we still rely on flashlights and generators for emergency lighting.

                              Dan
                              ** I collect flashlights, so having one on every table is quite convenient.
                              At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                              Location: SF East Bay.

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                              • Originally posted by danlb View Post
                                ** I collect flashlights, so having one on every table is quite convenient.
                                The funny part was, that once I got back into the garage, there were TWO flashlights on the end of my welding table, DIRECTLY BEHIND me when the lights went out. Had no idea they were there until I came back in. Luckily my shop floor is so open and clean that it was an easy walk out in the dark.....lol

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