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  • Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post

    Looks great,do you use a Jig for keeping # stamps aligned and spaced correctly.
    Thanks! I did the stamps by eye, using the edges of the holes as a reference. There's enough space around that any slight misalignment (and there is some) isn't too obvious. I thought about painting the stamped numbers, but I had run out of puff by then

    Originally posted by Bruno Mueller View Post

    In the meantime I have found another record for it.
    The TCMT carbide plate has a clearance angle of 7 degrees at the cutting edge.
    You have to regrind it a little bit.
    This plate is mainly used for turning operations.
    Another carbide plate TPGW has a clearance angle of 11 degrees. The geometry is the same.
    TPGW 11 02 04 or 11 04 08. this type does not need to be regrinded
    This type of plate is very often used for milling cutters.
    that's really useful info, I didn't know that there was a similar insert with more clearance, thanks!

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    • I have a set of 5C collets for a spindexer. Which are hardly ever used. Out of sight, out of mind and a couple developed minor rust. To nip that in the bud, I found a plastic container that would hold them, drilled a piece of acrylic as an index, and tossed in a couple of packets of silica gel.

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      • Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post
        I have a set of 5C collets for a spindexer. Which are hardly ever used. Out of sight, out of mind and a couple developed minor rust. To nip that in the bud, I found a plastic container that would hold them, drilled a piece of acrylic as an index, and tossed in a couple of packets of silica gel.

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        Bob, silica packets should do the trick. But these little foam squares might interest you: https://nz.rs-online.com/web/p/rust-...itors/2904342/

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        • Cleaned up the outside of the wiper motor case by cutting the mounts off. Also had to drill out 2 broken screws.....






          Still need to make a couple pulleys and a mount, but it's getting closer to winding yarn.

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          • Seeing Mike Burch's thread reminds me of a couple products that really work. These Amsoil metal protectants are the jazz. The light one is perfect for tooling. The heavy duty one goes on thin but after a day dries to a thick waxy coating. As I don't use my dividing head very often and it's stored in the often damp garage I coated the plates etc with the heavy stuff.A couple years later I used it and swabbed off the coating and the parts are perfect. Both are worth the money. Go online to buy them or find a local guy selling the stuff.
            Attached Files

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            • What started out as a rotted corner post in my sunroom has turned into a whole rotted outer wall. The roof of the sunroom is a sundeck off of my bedroom. So a railing must be removed and a portion of the sundecking removed to expose a couple of feet of joists where they meet the header beam. The beam, and the soffet are rotted crumbly lumps. Many of the joists are rotted. Before cutting and exposing more, i built bracing inside the sunroom to support the overhead.
              This wiped out my salmon fishing and most of my bench time.
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              Last edited by Ironbearmarine; 09-10-2020, 09:53 PM.

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              • I did some extensive repairs like that about 15 years ago:

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                http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                USA Maryland 21030

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                • Its so weird how you build with wood in the States.How sustainable is wood and do you treat the wood . What type of wood do you use and how long does a tree take to grow.

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                  • Not american but in Finland wood is the primary building material and always has been.

                    Wood is sustainable or not depending on how it's logged. Most of the bulk of the house don't need any treatment. Exterior facade boards do well with paint. The sill plate can be treated as it's more exposed and sits lowest to the ground.

                    But there was wooden buildings that have lasted a thousand years so they can be durable. Not uncommon here to find houses from the 1700 and 1800s still standing and being inhabited, even heard of a few 1600s ones. Modern cheapo construction like what one might find in modern suburbias though....

                    A timbered log house can actually be considered a carbon sink for as long as it stands.

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                    • My houses were built around 1877 and the floor joists downstairs are chestnut logs, and other framing is probably old growth pine, spruce, or fir. The window frames, sashes, and siding are cypress, which is quite rot-resistant. The lower levels of my houses are partially below grade, with an 18" thick rock, mortar, and brick foundation, which seeps water and adds a lot of humidity to the living areas. I used some original framing lumber (removed from other parts of the houses), as well as new pressure-treated dimension lumber. My brother replaced some rotten floor joists with untreated lumber that he painted with creosote around 1990, and by 2008 it had badly rotted away.

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                      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                      USA Maryland 21030

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                      • Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
                        Not american but in Finland wood is the primary building material and always has been.

                        Wood is sustainable or not depending on how it's logged. Most of the bulk of the house don't need any treatment. Exterior facade boards do well with paint. The sill plate can be treated as it's more exposed and sits lowest to the ground.

                        But there was wooden buildings that have lasted a thousand years so they can be durable. Not uncommon here to find houses from the 1700 and 1800s still standing and being inhabited, even heard of a few 1600s ones. Modern cheapo construction like what one might find in modern suburbias though....

                        A timbered log house can actually be considered a carbon sink for as long as it stands.
                        Wood is amazing stuff.We build with brick and mortar.Our roofs are made of wood . We call it S African pine but I suspect its not endemic to Africa.It grows fast, about eight years I think. We have to treat it for wood borer so its boiled in a large vat with some chemical.

                        We have wood borer. The strangest thing is my area has no wood borer but as the crow flies ,four km away the houses ,if not using treated wood, suffer from terrible wood borer. I think it has to do with the type of soil.
                        Could you explain the carbon sink.

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                        • Originally posted by plunger View Post

                          Wood is amazing stuff.We build with brick and mortar.Our roofs are made of wood . We call it S African pine but I suspect its not endemic to Africa.It grows fast, about eight years I think. We have to treat it for wood borer so its boiled in a large vat with some chemical.

                          We have wood borer. The strangest thing is my area has no wood borer but as the crow flies ,four km away the houses ,if not using treated wood, suffer from terrible wood borer. I think it has to do with the type of soil.
                          Could you explain the carbon sink.
                          Any wood that is used in construction ties up the carbon as the trees have absorbed the CO2 from the air. As long as the building stands and is not rotting the carbon stays there. This removal of the CO2 from the air is called a carbon sink. If the building burns or rots, the carbon is returned to the environment.

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                          • Originally posted by Ironbearmarine View Post
                            What started out as a rotted corner post in my sunroom has turned into a whole rotted outer wall. The roof of the sunroom is a sundeck off of my bedroom. So a railing must be removed and a portion of the sundecking removed to expose a couple of feet of joists where they meet the header beam. The beam, and the soffet are rotted crumbly lumps. Many of the joists are rotted. Before cutting and exposing more, i built bracing inside the sunroom to support the overhead.
                            This wiped out my salmon fishing and most of my bench time.
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                            No way should ANY project be more important than fishing. The rot wasn't going anywhere.
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                            • Originally posted by Mike Burch View Post

                              Bob, silica packets should do the trick. But these little foam squares might interest you: https://nz.rs-online.com/web/p/rust-...itors/2904342/
                              Those are interesting. Do they evaporate/disappear so you know when to replace them? McM-C has equivalent (?) pads that you can buy one at a time, I think I'll try one.
                              https://www.mcmaster.com/78125T24/

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                              • A neighbor gave me a forged blank made from an engine exhaust valve, it is stainless steel. And I polished it today on the machine. I'll make a knife).

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