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  • Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
    then realized I didn't have an M3 counterbore....yet.
    6mm endmill? I tend to like a closer fit than standard counterbores offer as it means less crud gets stuck around the head of the SHCS. To be fair though, I've really not got over the idea that things must be a really close fit/precise size even when there is no need to make my life difficult

    Discovered today that not all aluminium LED torches will run on 18650 batteries instead of 3xAAA in a cage....cough....fumes....cough. Damaged cell and broken switch (melted internally, I think).

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    • Got a 4" × 36" wet belt sander, took it apart for refurb. Decided to show the boy how to map out wear on the platen with the surface plate and an indicator. Then flattened it back out.

      The map, in easy to understand for kids colors:

      Green = high point
      White = high to -.005"
      Black = -.006" to -.010"
      Blue = -.011" to -.015"
      Pink. = -.016" to -.020"
      Gray = -.021" to -.025"
      Red = -.026" or more.

      Click image for larger version  Name:	20201231_210356.jpg Views:	0 Size:	1.46 MB ID:	1919488

      Mid-milling:

      Click image for larger version  Name:	20210101_144051.jpg Views:	0 Size:	1.87 MB ID:	1919489

      Back to flat:

      Click image for larger version  Name:	20210101_144110.jpg Views:	0 Size:	1.08 MB ID:	1919490
      Last edited by eKretz; 01-01-2021, 04:54 PM.

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      • Got my sled running for the first time.....then it quit on me again. Time to pull the carbs and give them a good cleaning.

        Finished my Wife's yarn winder Christmas present from 2019 last night too....... Worked great first time, and she's pretty happy to not have to hand wind a big wholesale order this weekend. I still need to 3d print some additional arms (only did one side, to make sure they worked) and clean up the electrics. I'm designing the enclosure right now and will print it later tonight. I have some features I want to incorporate on the control side, but at the moment it's a bit above my pay grade. Time to put the learning cap on and figure out some arduino programming. Thankfully she doesn't need that functionality for now, so I have till next Christmas to figure it out .

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        • Originally posted by Cenedd View Post

          6mm endmill? I tend to like a closer fit than standard counterbores offer as it means less crud gets stuck around the head of the SHCS. To be fair though, I've really not got over the idea that things must be a really close fit/precise size even when there is no need to make my life difficult

          Discovered today that not all aluminium LED torches will run on 18650 batteries instead of 3xAAA in a cage....cough....fumes....cough. Damaged cell and broken switch (melted internally, I think).
          I could have also used a 6-32 counter bore, but didn't have that size either. I used an endmill in the past, but started buying these instead since it basically cuts the work in half and does a really neat job.
          https://www.mcmaster.com/counterbore...-counterbores/

          I've got basically a whole set except for the 6-32 and M6 sizes.

          As far as clearance, the rails are set in milled slots so they won't move anyway. The top plate will get swept into alignment with an indicator. Once I am happy with everything, the socket heads will get filled with wax and the counter bores will be filled with epoxy and scraped flush with a razor blade. That way if I ever need to take it apart, I can drill the epoxy and access the sockets.
          I just need one more tool,just one!

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          • Originally posted by eKretz View Post
            Decided to show the boy how to map out wear on the platen with the surface plate and an indicator. Then flattened it back out.

            Mid-milling:
            If you milled it flat, surely you just milled the whole surface until the last bit cleaned up? I can understand the mapping if you were scraping it....or was it just to show the technique?
            wierdscience Those are interesting; I've never seen them self-drilling before. Pricey (but then I'm a cheapskate!) to buy a set but I can certainly see it making life easier (and justifying its cost) if you have a load of the same size to drill.
            I may have to adapt your wax idea to some of the SHCS holes on my lathe that are far too big and constantly end up packed with chips - that may sound like a non-issue but it's more of a slot than a hole and I'm pretty sure stuff can fall through to the apron gears.....and it's annoying!

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            • Originally posted by Cenedd View Post

              If you milled it flat, surely you just milled the whole surface until the last bit cleaned up? I can understand the mapping if you were scraping it....or was it just to show the technique?
              Yes, just to show my son (age 9) how to map a worn surface. The coloring was just to help him visualize the wear pattern.

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              • Originally posted by eKretz View Post
                Yes, just to show my son (age 9) how to map a worn surface. The coloring was just to help him visualize the wear pattern.
                Cool. I was clearly overthinking it again Well done on getting him interested enough to spend that much time on it! I've not managed it yet and mine's also 9.

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                • Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
                  ...
                  https://www.mcmaster.com/counterbore...-counterbores/

                  I've got basically a whole set except for the 6-32 and M6 sizes....
                  Nice, but $$$ $240-some for just the metric!

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                  • Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
                    ...
                    I may have to adapt your wax idea to some of the SHCS holes on my lathe that are far too big and constantly end up packed with chips - ....and it's annoying!
                    Indeed it is annoying! To change the angle on my compound, I have to blow out chips from the SHCS and every time I think "Why did they do it this way?"

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                    • Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

                      Nice, but $$$ $240-some for just the metric!
                      Well I do drill a lot of capscrew holes though. It's not bad when you figure what a quality drill and endmill costs, or a drill and a piloted counterbore, which actually costs more. When factored in that the hole is compete in one setup it's worth it IMO.
                      I just need one more tool,just one!

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                      • Finally got the skein winder I made together enough to run and use. I just had to ditch the DPDT switch on the PWM controller and made up a quick and dirty momentary deadman foot switch to make operation a bit easier, safer and free up her hands.






                        As you can tell by the smile, she's happy . She's only been winding for 3 hours, but she's already halfway through winding a large order that would have taken her about 3 days to do manually with the umbrella winder seen in the background (over her left shoulder).

                        I still have some electronic stuff I need to figure out to control it better (yardage counter, auto stop and a few other things I'm dreaming of, but don't know how to implement yet), but for what she needs now, it works. There's also another arm on the other side, but It's removable. If she's skeining off bulk cones she'll run all 6 spots, but for what she's doing now it was just in the way.

                        Here's a quick video of it running. https://i.imgur.com/Moly1eCl.mp4

                        I was going to print up a quick enclosure for the PWM controller as right now it's just hanging from the motor, but my 3d printer was giving me fits. I think it's time to build a new one.....

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                        • My Dad also stopped by for a visit and we got to lay some fresh tracks in the backyard on last nights snow.


                          Then I had to fix the winch on the plow jeep. The motor had locked up from corrosion, so I took it apart, replaced all the springs in the brushes, and sanded all the contacts. Back in business. Jeep hadn't ran since all year, but it fired right up with a bit of gas down the carb (accelerator pump doesn't work). I'm officially ready for winter.

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                          • Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
                            This is the main lathe at work. Nardini Mascote 1440.

                            Click image for larger version Name:	nardini at work.jpg Views:	0 Size:	135.1 KB ID:	1917375

                            I have mixed feelings about it. I really like the gear changes, long throw, very smooth. 9 real speeds is quite nice, and it runs slower than average. I also really like the feed clutch, has a manly, positive engagement. It's also the quietest lathe I've ever ran. Must have a really good oil pump. Maybe it's all that graphite. 😛 Starts instantly as well.

                            Things I don't like:
                            • 8tpi screws
                            • you must reverse the entire gearbox to feed in the opposite direction instead of just the apron, requiring a stop.
                            • Gearbox setup sucks compared to an Asian lathe style (ABC, RST, VWXYZ). Two levers to half or double feed vs one, hard clash requires a spindle stop)
                            • The brake fires with enough force to squeal the belts every time.
                            • Motor speed selector is nearly on the floor. WTF?
                            • Feedscrew and leadscrew run at the same time, they also each have their own tumblers. Strange.
                            The things got so many problems. The wipers are worn plumb out so they do nothing. Auto oiling doesn't work.The ways are of course packed with graphite, so if you do oil it it just bleeds graphite. Gib surfaces packed too, everything is stiff. I run it dry, cleaner that way. A guy promised me some funding if I'll get them a list of work it needs done, we'll see. They really aren't equipped for much machine work here, but yet they expect it often which doesn't make much sense. And they really need a metal lathe segregated away from the graphite dust. I'm really spoiled at home.

                            I wasn't hired on to do machine work like... at all, but that's what happens when folks find out your capable I guess. Ehh, maybe they'll train me on the CNC mill. I could use some CNC experience.
                            With the 2 speed WEG motor, it actually has 18 speeds. Set your feed selector to T, which will stop unnecessary spinning of one of those shafts. Sounds like your electric brake needs adjustment if it is kicking in before the motor is deactivated. You can take off that motor switch bracket and move it up by 90° to make it set higher.

                            Graphite dust.... yuk!

                            Salem, Oregon

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                            • Originally posted by Danl View Post

                              With the 2 speed WEG motor, it actually has 18 speeds. Set your feed selector to T, which will stop unnecessary spinning of one of those shafts. Sounds like your electric brake needs adjustment if it is kicking in before the motor is deactivated. You can take off that motor switch bracket and move it up by 90° to make it set higher.

                              Graphite dust.... yuk!
                              Yeah, I knew about the 2 speed motor. But 1/2 of those speeds are 1/2 power (not that it matters).

                              Good call about the T setting. I learned that last week. They were pretty covered in dust so I didn't investigate too closely. I'm sure the electric brake could use some adjustment the whole thing could. But I was hired on to run a DMLS printer, not fix lathes. I don't really have the weight to get maintenance to take on projects yet either. Maybe sometime this year I'll make some improvements on it.

                              Yes I'm sick of it. I did a job making a fixture for an engineer. Later I asked why it had to be graphite and he's like "Oh I guess it didn't, that's just what we had." I told him to buy a damn $40 5c step collet next time.
                              21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                              1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                              • Yep, only 3 HP at the low speed setting. Does yours have the taper attachment? Mine does, but I've never used it.
                                Parts are almost non-existent. If there are any new parts available, they may be in Brazil, and would be very expensive.

                                Didn't that graphite dust try to get into your lungs? wow.... not fun.
                                Salem, Oregon

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