Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What did you do today?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • It's interesting to see the different standards in other countries. I've never seen a copper threaded fitting llike that - always brass. UK ironnmongers wuld laugh at you for asking for copper. Like those stupid flap valves in toilets and 18th century twin shaft wheelbarrows - there's a wrong way and a right way to do some things.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Jerrythepilot View Post
      I've had good luck with the Blue Block pipe dope.
      I've always had good luck with pipe dope. Maybe 1-2 leaks... ever. And usually fixable with a wrench.

      Tef tape on the other hand....
      21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
      1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

      Comment


      • IMO copper should be soldered, full stop. Even when the fitting is threaded, it should still be soldered.

        Comment


        • Patched a rust hole in the Mazda, me and my dad, he did the welding and sheet metal work, he's the better welder of us. I did the prep work (cutting & cleaning) and post welding stuff. Used a high zinc primer known as cold galvanization primer here, then dinitrol ml which is a penetrating and creeping corrosion protection, then the thicker stuff which will harden to an elastic layer. Still need to spray in dinitrol into the cavity behind the patch.

          Comment


          • Copper into steel may have galling etc, but the main issue I have seen is that the steel will corrode like crazy right next to the copper.

            Get a brass or bronze fitting and put it between the two. Brass or bronze will not accelerate rust on steel, and copper gets along fine with brass or bronze, so you avoid the problem. The other way is with a dielectric union.

            The previous owners of my house re-piped the basement bath with copper, and screwed it directly into the steel supply lines. Every time we used a water tap, about 15 to 25 seconds after the tap was opened, a slug of orange-brown water came through, due to the rusting.

            That bath as a whole was for s***, so we had it completely torn put and re-done. When the pipes were put in, and over the plumbers desperate attempts to convince me otherwise, I made them put in dielectric unions. No more orange water, no problems in the last 25 years.
            2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan


            It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
              Copper into steel may have galling etc, but the main issue I have seen is that the steel will corrode like crazy right next to the copper.

              Get a brass or bronze fitting and put it between the two. Brass or bronze will not accelerate rust on steel, and copper gets along fine with brass or bronze, so you avoid the problem. The other way is with a dielectric union.
              Would that still work if it's a loop? I got the impression this was a setup for essentially a radiator embedded in the floor so logically the water will for round that and back rather than being discarded at the end like if you were filling a bath. If it's a loop, you still have an electrolyte (the water with it's dissolved minerals) moving from anode to cathode (or vice versa) and so you still have a galvanic cell leading to corrosion. I have zero knowledge of this in plumbing but for PC water-cooling it's an issue when someone sticks some aluminium in the loop (with the rest being brass and copper). The effect occurs even though the tubing is usually plastic.

              Comment


              • Hi Guys,

                The setup I have the galling problem with is a Stainless Steel "Y" strainer and the copper threaded connectors. I think I have found a brass equivalent to use for the strainer.

                Maybe a different question would be is a strainer needed in a closed loop water system with 90% of the system is PEX tubing in the floor and the rest is copper and brass with the exception of the expansion tank. I've ordered the strainer and it's a few days away but if it's not needed maybe I cancel it and get on with the project. I've just always seen one in the HVAC systems that I've worked on over the years.

                Let me know what you guys think.

                TX
                Mr fixit for the family
                Chris

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Mr Fixit View Post
                  Maybe a different question would be is a strainer needed in a closed loop water system with 90% of the system is PEX tubing in the floor and the rest is copper and brass with the exception of the expansion tank.

                  TX
                  Mr fixit for the family
                  Chris
                  I had wondered if that was a requirement of the heating unit. I have a cast iron hydronic system, copper baseboard and copper lines, black iron pipe transition to Cu, no strainer. I'd say no.

                  Comment


                  • Combo drill-nail


                    https://i.imgur.com/taplQIs.jpg

                    needed long 3.5mm drill and steel nail was first suitable piece of rod to weld on..
                    worked ok for 130mm deep hole in aluminium. Pecked every 5mm
                    Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

                    Comment


                    • My field sprayer needs a filter to keep the tiny nozzles from plugging. A heating system should not have any tiny orifices to plug so after the first use where the filter might pick up stray material that could ruin a pump, the filter should not be necessary.

                      After a few uses, my sprayer doesn't really need the filter either as I have removed all the debris and if I am careful filling the tank I don't get any more debris.

                      Comment


                      • Yesterday I went deep into a rabbit hole. Needless to say, I now have access to all the original blueprints to build a P51 from the ground up if I so desired.
                        I only desire to build the cockpit, starting with the thrust quadrant, already ordered some 2024 t3 Aluminum which is the equivelent to 24st called for in the drawings for this part.
                        Click image for larger version

Name:	20210121_082515.jpg
Views:	289
Size:	3.81 MB
ID:	1923106

                        Comment


                        • You planning to learn to fly a Mustang?
                          “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                          Lewis Grizzard

                          Comment


                          • Filled up the 2'nd radiators that had air at the relative's house that we are cleaning up (I'm the executor).

                            Found outhow that happened...... a radiator on the first floor started leaking water in a steady stream when the heat went on. Thought about plumber's epoxy, but called plumbing/heating companies and got noplace. Most don't do hot water systems, one could do it monday when I won't be here. Got some epoxy and put it on, but kept calling.

                            Got a place that both does radiators and was finishing a job nearby. Got the radiator disconnected and capped off. Now I am waiting as the system slowly refills through its crazy valve..... yes I have vents open with jars under them.

                            Do not have any 4 foot pipe wrenches here. The guy who did it was about 6'2 and 275 lb, and even he had to heat the joint AND use the big wrenches.
                            2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan


                            It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Dave C View Post
                              You planning to learn to fly a Mustang?
                              If I was rich I'd buy one

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                                Filled up the 2'nd radiators that had air at the relative's house that we are cleaning up (I'm the executor).

                                Found outhow that happened...... a radiator on the first floor started leaking water in a steady stream when the heat went on. Thought about plumber's epoxy, but called plumbing/heating companies and got noplace. Most don't do hot water systems, one could do it monday when I won't be here. Got some epoxy and put it on, but kept calling.

                                Got a place that both does radiators and was finishing a job nearby. Got the radiator disconnected and capped off. Now I am waiting as the system slowly refills through its crazy valve..... yes I have vents open with jars under them.

                                Do not have any 4 foot pipe wrenches here. The guy who did it was about 6'2 and 275 lb, and even he had to heat the joint AND use the big wrenches.
                                Many hot water systems have a bypass valve for filling that bypasses the water pressure regulator to allow faster filling. Some of the regulators have "arm" on them that opens them fully for faster filling. Filling is indeed extremely slow going through the regulator. I doubt you missed spotting one but its worth mentioning. Does the system have a circulator pump or is it so old that its gravity flow? I worked on a lot of hot water systems, and steam over the years but you are correct, its hard to find anyone these days that will touch one. Hot water used to be considered the ultimate heat for a house, that all changed when air conditioning became so popular (no ductwork for the ac).

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X