Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What did you do today?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post
    Many hot water systems have a bypass valve for filling that bypasses the water pressure regulator to allow faster filling. Some of the regulators have "arm" on them that opens them fully for faster filling. Filling is indeed extremely slow going through the regulator. I doubt you missed spotting one but its worth mentioning. Does the system have a circulator pump or is it so old that its gravity flow? I worked on a lot of hot water systems, and steam over the years but you are correct, its hard to find anyone these days that will touch one. Hot water used to be considered the ultimate heat for a house, that all changed when air conditioning became so popular (no ductwork for the ac).
    The ones I've had came with a plastic 'key' that you opened the filling loop and then turned on the tap - but I've also seen it done as ball valves with mini taps on. Mine is accessed from underneath....which wouldn't be a problem had the plumber not fitted it with the bottom sitting on the floor (of the loft)!

    Put what I hoped would be the final coat of oil on a pull-out shelf I'm building for the bench grinder. I suspect it may take another coat though from the look of it.

    This afternoon I'm taking my mum for her first covid vaccination. She won't be safe* yet but it's a start.
    *either for herself or as my biggest exposure risk - both are valid!

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post

      Many hot water systems have a bypass valve for filling that bypasses the water pressure regulator to allow faster filling. Some of the regulators have "arm" on them that opens them fully for faster filling. Filling is indeed extremely slow going through the regulator. I doubt you missed spotting one but its worth mentioning. Does the system have a circulator pump or is it so old that its gravity flow? I worked on a lot of hot water systems, and steam over the years but you are correct, its hard to find anyone these days that will touch one. Hot water used to be considered the ultimate heat for a house, that all changed when air conditioning became so popular (no ductwork for the ac).
      No regulator, just a backflow preventer with no bypass. I know flow is occurring because the radiators do fill eventually, and I can feel the stone cold water coming in on the pipe. Gravity flow system but has a circulator pump now. The old furnace was coal (in 1914) then oil in the 40s-50s, finally gas, and then replaced for a small gas boiler.

      Those gravity flow pipes are big, and it takes a long time to fill them. I figure the upstairs will get filled today. Did finally get water from the bleed valves last night on first floor, so I could turn on the heat.

      2730

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Everything not impossible is compulsory

      Comment


      • Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

        No regulator, just a backflow preventer with no bypass. I know flow is occurring because the radiators do fill eventually, and I can feel the stone cold water coming in on the pipe. Gravity flow system but has a circulator pump now. The old furnace was coal (in 1914) then oil in the 40s-50s, finally gas, and then replaced for a small gas boiler.

        Those gravity flow pipes are big, and it takes a long time to fill them. I figure the upstairs will get filled today. Did finally get water from the bleed valves last night on first floor, so I could turn on the heat.
        Hopefully the newer boiler has a low water shutoff device. Problem with no regulator and just a manual fill valve is that if the water level lowers over time due to leaks or whatever, it does not automatically replenish it. A added advantage is the regulator keeps the system pressure constant. I am surprised still it is taking that long to fill. The flow rate into the system must be pretty small, even with the big pipes and radiators the system capacity isn't all that big to take over a day to fill. You may know it but another point is that you will need to bleed air from the system after refilling many times, air precipitates out of the water during the heat cycles so more initial bleeding will be necessary. Did I mention I hate working on hot water systems? LOL

        Comment


        • Built a dust collector for the top of my tablesaw.
          Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_7217.jpg
Views:	435
Size:	3.99 MB
ID:	1923509

          Comment


          • Ar bleeding is needed to fill. Then it is needed later, yes. and from time to time even if not filled recently.

            Have it at home also, NO backflow and no regulator, plus fills fast, although it has not been drained for years (draining is bad for the system). Topped up a time or two after bleeding air.
            2730

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

            Everything not impossible is compulsory

            Comment


            • Originally posted by RB211 View Post

              If I was rich I'd buy one
              Just a tad over 2 million will put you behind the stick 1945 NORTH AMERICAN P-51 MUSTANG For Sale in Spring, Texas | Controller.com
              “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

              Lewis Grizzard

              Comment


              • Made a pull-out shelf for my grinder. It had previously been condemned to the bottom shelf with one wheel sort of accessible each side of that upright but it was far from ideal. This way it should take up less space as it can go in deep rather than wide. I'd tell you how the mess is only because I've not rearranged everything after getting this in place, but that would be.....let's say a distortion of the truth




                Grinder weighs 30kg (spec) and the beech-block worktop used is also far from light. Drawer runners are rated for 60kg and would have been a lot smoother if I'd not got some untraceable swarf in them Still, it slides in and out well enough and it's not likely to be constantly in and out. I need to make rests for both sides yet - one is broken (cracked) and the other is just plain hopeless. That's why there's some space in front of it; to mount the rests to. That and a quench pot of some sort. Will probably have to screw it down so it stays still relative to the rests.

                Currently trying to 3D print better extraction attachments. Mine will (hopefully!) screw onto the hose. The thread of the hose is odd in that it is 1.5", 5tpi, 1/8" thread depth, left handed, rounded at the top and square at the bottom. For some reason Fusion 360 doesn't have that as a standard thread type! I want to get both wheels on one hose for convenience.

                Comment


                • finally got the snowblower in shape. Replaced the engine oil. Replaced the gear oil. New drive belt. Tire pressure fixed. Broken bolts (shear pins) replaced. New spark plug, carb cleaner inside the head and and carburetor to loosen old grime. Now it's finally back to working properly. Wonder how long it'll last.

                  Last edited by DennisCA; 01-29-2021, 02:06 AM.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
                    finally got the snowblower in shape. Replaced the engine oil. Replaced the gear oil. New drive belt. Tire pressure fixed. Broken bolts (shear pins) replaced. New spark plug, carb cleaner inside the head and and carburetor to loosen old grime. Now it's finally back to working properly. Wonder how long it'll last.

                    If it was mine it would probably last through the next to last snowfall.
                    Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

                    Comment


                    • I took some pictures at the shop. We're building a few more large bridge cranes - Two 80 ton, 90' span double box girder cranes each with 3 built up trolleys. And a conveyor. Rush is on for the conveyor, it has to make it across an ice road and the season for that closes in a few weeks. First crane, 2 girders, should be shipped next week




                      getting ready to set and align two girders



                      two girders aligned, the tow bar gets fit between, welded to its bolt plates, then it all comes apart to go down the road



                      the hoists (6 of them) are all built up - made here





                      as are the blocks



                      with a walkway - plate in the foreground is the bottom of the next girder - 1" thick material



                      small(ish) conveyor going to a diamond mine in the NWT. There's a hopper and feeder as well






                      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

                      Comment


                      • Mcgyver Interesting, thanks. I like the way the drums are sort of threaded so the cable winds tidily - probably an obvious thing...but if you've not seen it before
                        I'd ask you to make me a tiny shop jib crane....but I reckon the trans-atlantic shipping alone would blow the (non-existent) budget!

                        Comment


                        • Nice work Mcgyver, some big impressive stuff there. Those cable spools look familiar.....They didn't happen to come from a shop in Peterborough by chance?

                          Yesterday I bought a bunch (1800lbs) of steel from the local supplier that was cleaning up a bunch of odds and ends. A lot of stuff I needed to finish my sawmill build, and some other stuff that will come in handy for other shop projects. There's also a belt grinder hiding in there waiting to be freed.
                          Last edited by Dan Dubeau; 01-29-2021, 09:10 AM.

                          Comment


                          • Today, I discovered that a 10-24 UNC screw does not fit the M5 hole you just drilled and tapped for it....even if you've taken the trouble to shorten it and nicely file the ends.
                            At least I have plenty of other M5 screws I can use instead....oh wait, nope, these "M5" imposters are the only ones I have. Sigh.

                            Comment


                            • This evening I got my Ames back to operational. I've got a few items to clean up yet, but it's up and running and working excellent.





                              Cayuga, Ontario, Canada

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
                                Nice work Mcgyver, some big impressive stuff there. Those cable spools look familiar.....They didn't happen to come from a shop in Peterborough by chance?
                                Thanks. On the Patch, no, but there is another crane shop east of TO
                                in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X