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  • Four weeks ago i disassembled a 30 year old sundeck. Three weeks ago i repurposed much of the lumber from the old sundeck and built some large raised beds on the site of the old sundeck for growing a nice kitchen garden. Two weeks ago i bought 1500 pounds of drain rock and eighty 60 pound sacks of topsoil. I loaded the truck myself, unloaded it at my shop then hand carried the load down a forested path to the raised beds and filled them. Last Thursday i bought the lumber and hardware and commenced building a green house around those raised beds. The shell is up and i am waiting for the plastic sheathing to arrive. What i did today was : take the day off and smoke a big smelly cigar on my veranda. Oh, and the wife said to me last night; “ honey, i only said, i think i might like to try growing my own herbs....

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    • Took the LED lamp apart (looking to upgrade it to something that actually lights things up!) on the end of the gooseneck attached to my grinder. Took a shock off it with the power off. Metered it out and it's 2.8V DC across the terminals but 240V AC from either terminal to chassis ground (the gooseneck). Doesn't seem to be anything touching anywhere it shouldn't. Start capacitor might explain shock when off - or I could have switched off the wrong power socket but the NVR switch was definitely off as the grinder would have been running otherwise!

      Anyone with better electrics/electronics knowledge than me (Jerry? ) suggest what the issue might be to produce that? I'm thinking at the moment that the transformer might either be faulty or just terrible design.

      Anyone got any suggestions of cheap gooseneck LEDs that don't cost unreasonable amounts of money (like $75 for a German one!) but give out enough light to actually see what you're grinding?

      Click image for larger version

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      • Poor ground connection. Modern power supplies have all sorts of filters that discharge to ground
        Helder Ferreira
        Setubal, Portugal

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        • I've checked and that transformer/PSU only has two inputs and two outputs. The inputs are to the live and neutral on the switched side of the NVR switch and the outputs go via the wire nuts to the LED. The whole unit is potted in a plastic case and the mounting lug is plastic too so there doesn't appear to be any provision for an earth. Unless you mean it's faulty inside the potting compound?

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          • Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
            Tormach got it's first "paying" job yesterday as I needed a 27mm deep socket to replace an oil pressure sensor on my truck.

            Nothing pretty, just a chunk of tube I welded an old 3/8" drive socket in the back end and cut the 27mm hex. Nothing like having your truck break down on the way into work ("lost" oil pressure) after spending all your money on a CNC mill. Fun times....

            On a side note I'm really pleasantly surprised at how well the Tormach cut steel. I honestly wasn't expecting that. Can't wait to get it all fixed up and settled into it's new home.
            Why did you choose to add a block of wood to the clamping? I'm weighing the plus and minus of it.
            I'd sure like to have cnc available for those one tasks. Nice job.
            Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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            • Originally posted by Cenedd View Post
              Took the LED lamp apart (looking to upgrade it to something that actually lights things up!) on the end of the gooseneck attached to my grinder. Took a shock off it with the power off. Metered it out and it's 2.8V DC across the terminals but 240V AC from either terminal to chassis ground (the gooseneck). Doesn't seem to be anything touching anywhere it shouldn't. Start capacitor might explain shock when off - or I could have switched off the wrong power socket but the NVR switch was definitely off as the grinder would have been running otherwise!

              Anyone with better electrics/electronics knowledge than me (Jerry? ) suggest what the issue might be to produce that? I'm thinking at the moment that the transformer might either be faulty or just terrible design.

              Anyone got any suggestions of cheap gooseneck LEDs that don't cost unreasonable amounts of money (like $75 for a German one!) but give out enough light to actually see what you're grinding?

              Click image for larger version

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              How long does the gooseneck need to be? I put one of these on my mini-lathe and stick the magnet to the backsplash so I can put the light right where I need it.

              https://www.ebay.com/itm/30-LED-Sewi...Cclp%3A2334524

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              • It could do with being about 500mm (20" ish). The existing one is a little shorter and doesn't really get where you need it easily. I'd seen those ones sold as sewing machine lights but they don't give a lot of idea how bright they are or how long the gooseneck is....although I suspect too short. I was looking at one of these: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07Y5W5ZG4
                but it's about the top of what I'd be willing to pay and reviews suggest they may not last long. They also have full mains voltage running down the gooseneck. I was wondering whether I could split a GU10 bulb so that the included transformer is in the base of the grinder and the head is on the end of a gooseneck. Should mean the gooseneck only has low voltage and I ought to be able to get replacement parts by just gutting another bulb.

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                • Originally posted by flathead4 View Post

                  Why did you choose to add a block of wood to the clamping? I'm weighing the plus and minus of it.
                  I'd sure like to have cnc available for those one tasks. Nice job.
                  Thanks, it's going to prove itself really handy around here. Steel on steel clamping a tube like that (2 points) is too "slippery" IMO. Crank down too tight and you deform the tube, too light and it can shift easily. Tough to find that goldilocks zone. I would have used a Vee block, and no wood for 3 point contact if I had one at home*, but I didn't. I have very little mill tooling at home, it's all at work. Wood deforms easily and spreads out even pressure and more importantly, friction. I use it every once in a while to clamp delicate, uneven things for light/medium milling. Or squaring up rough sawcut on 6 sides material. I've also got a roll of 1/8" annealed aluminum wire I use at work for clamping delicate things too that works great. Some might view it as a bit hackish, but it works great.

                  *since getting the Tormach I've realized how much support tooling I'll need to buy again to make it productive. I've either got to buy a couple hundred bucks of duplicate tooling, have a travel box I take back and forth to work once in a while, or quit my job and bring my boxes home...My bank account is crying right now, so #1, and #3 are out lol. #2 it is.

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                  • Ok, I have achieved the loss of one of the bulbs in my shed. That's progress!
                    Gooseneck seems to be next to impossible (or ridiculously priced) to find in the UK. Have a pair of M10x500mm on a slow boat from China. Wanted black but could only find silver.
                    Bulb is apart and seems to be really well made so it looks rather promising. Just need to machine up a gooseneck (M10) to lamp body interface now

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                    • Looking good! I'm not too sure that cone at the end of the track will stop the train, though...
                      Kansas City area

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                      • The lift mechanism on my snowblower tractor attachment has always been hard and awkward to use, especially when wet snow gathers outside of the chute. After the last snows I decided to do something about it. I saw on youtube some nice lifts using linear actuators, but being the cheap bastard I am, I figured I could make something. This is what I came up with. It works a treat, I can hook one finger on the lever and pull it up with no trouble Click image for larger version

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                        • Originally posted by Stu View Post
                          The lift mechanism on my snowblower tractor attachment has always been hard and awkward to use, especially when wet snow gathers outside of the chute. After the last snows I decided to do something about it. I saw on youtube some nice lifts using linear actuators, but being the cheap bastard I am, I figured I could make something. This is what I came up with. It works a treat, I can hook one finger on the lever and pull it up with no trouble
                          Without a before picture, I have no idea what you did. Longer lever?? That is a heck of a snow blower. I am glad I live far enough south that I don't need one, though.
                          Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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                          • Adding steps and doors. Lots of work, but having lots of fun too.
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                            • Originally posted by flathead4 View Post

                              Without a before picture, I have no idea what you did. Longer lever?? That is a heck of a snow blower. I am glad I live far enough south that I don't need one, though.
                              The lever was pretty long 60". It attached to the blower fairly low and extended back even with the steering wheel and you would push it down to lift the blower. It was getting a bit tough on these 70 year old shoulders. The blower is fantastic. I clear 6" of snow on my 600' drive in about 1/2hr, 12" in an hour

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                              • I made a couple of T-nuts to go in the slot in the compound on my 9" South Bend. I've been having to swap the one I use to hold the block for my Diamond Tool Holder so this will make my life a teeny tiny bit easier. 🙂
                                Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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