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  • I've been putting in a sidewalk using octagonal brick pavers. They are a bit tricky to get the interlocking to look good, but with dog's help it turned out OK.

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    That's not the final result. And the last picture was the first one I took with my new Motorola E6 smartphone.
    Last edited by PStechPaul; 10-18-2021, 04:06 AM.
    http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
    Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
    USA Maryland 21030

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    • My new to me oscilloscope had only one working channel, it is supposed to have two. It turned out to be a simple break in the solder joint behind the channel connector. Obvious once I had it apart.

      But due to me not knowing all the tricks to taking the thing apart I dismantled it excessively. I learned by taking it apart that far, I could simply have removed a lid and left it mostly intact. The board with the connectors was inside a steel case that was soldered together, turns out I could have just desoldered the lid and gotten access to the board directly without removing it from the scope body. Instead I removed the whole case and also the attached control panel board.

      Oscilloscope, the silver part on the bottom contains the board I wanted to inspect:


      Control board with case. The board I want to access is inside the case, they are connected with a 3 pin band cable and I couldn't figure out how to get them out separately.


      Well I opened up the case and found the bad solder joint:


      I put everything back together and nothing worked as it should! I was really biting my nails and worrying about what had happened, my initial thought was I'd fried something, perhaps via ESD even though I was careful to ground myself and also use an ESD mat.

      Fortunately someone tipped me that it could be that band cable I had been wrestling around, they where sensitive and can break inside without it being visible. A quick check wth a multimeter showed one of the three had indeed broken. I wondered if just one broken cable between the control panel and this board could cause that much trouble...

      I put in a replacement cable and soldered it to the other board to test it (by now I also figured out I could access the board without removing it). And sure enough everything started working properly again!



      I put the lid back on and left the cable I had moved. I am not sure if it will be an issue with the cable going there or not. The whole board is enclosed like this, even certain components are closed from each other in order to protect it from electromagnetic interference. But this shouldn't be transmitting the actual signal anywhere, it just connects the front panel to the signal board.



      And now I got two working channels, here I am testing a 3khz sine wave I am feeding from my PCs headphone socket.


      I also tried playing oscilloscope music via my PC (check youtube) and sure enough it worked, pretty cool that audio signals can make visuals.

      Comment


      • Ah, it looks like you fell for the same problem you get with PCs. If you put the lid back on without testing it first, it's almost guaranteed not to work. If you test it first, of course there'll be nothing wrong with it!
        Nice though. One of the few CRTs still in use I'd bet. Doesn't look like the focus has suffered much over the years either.

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        • It's much sharper in real life, just hard to get a photo to focus properly. Display is basically perfect. It's a 40mhz Hameg oscilloscope model 404-2

          Comment


          • Good on you. The little experience that I have with fixing scopes was filled with challenges of getting them apart. The designer wanted it to be compact, of course.

            Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
            It's much sharper in real life, just hard to get a photo to focus properly. Display is basically perfect. It's a 40mhz Hameg oscilloscope model 404-2
            Part of the problem is that the trace is so much brighter than the rest of the frame that it is over-exposed. If it was important, you could get real close to set the exposure based on the trace, freeze the setting, and move back for the shot. Unless that would freeze the focus also, then never mind.

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            • Shop furnace showed up today so it was time to get crackin. Had some fun with the sawzall and did a bunch of stuff not OSHA approved, but I got the corner cupboards down and made room for the furnace. Going to try and get the unit up and vented this weekend.




              I might slide the mill out of the corner so I can get in there with a ladder. Although it did make a pretty good demolition scaffold

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              • Got the local building inspector to check my work on a (partly) timber framed patio cover. Main truss is 28' wide. It passed.
                Attached Files

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                • Not today, but last night: I got rained on! In California this is a Very Big Deal!

                  We've had pretty much no rain since March or so. Everyone is aware of the wildfires raging, I guess. Everything is dry. But the Cal Fire people say the expected rain from the "atmospheric river" (which, I believe, we used to call the Pineapple Express because it originated around Hawaii) could end our fire season.

                  Periods of pretty heavy rain through the night and we're in a lull right now. More to come soon.

                  So last night around 8PM I was in my recliner surfing the net (probably here) (I have a computer connected to the 4K TV, very nice). I heard the cat door bang and the thud of heavy cat feet and (just as he leapt) I was able to tense up before our black kitty (who is pretty hefty) pounced right into my middle.

                  He was SOAKED! But he knew just what to do: flop down on me and dry off luxuriously on my sweatshirt. Then I was soaked.

                  He has very thick fur and I doubt he ever felt wet at the skin level. That fur did a great job of transferring the wetness to me.

                  Then he cuddled up and purred for a while, then (as he does) said "OK, tnx, bye" and off he went. Just like a cat.

                  -js
                  Last edited by Jim Stewart; 10-21-2021, 09:47 PM.
                  There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

                  Location: SF Bay Area

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Jim Stewart View Post
                    Not today, but last night: I got rained on! In California this is a Very Big Deal!

                    We've had pretty much no rain since March or so. Everyone is aware of the wildfires raging, I guess. Everything is dry. But the Cal Fire people say the expected rain from the "atmospheric river" (which, I believe, we used to call the Pineapple Express because it originated around Hawaii) could end our fire season.

                    Periods of pretty heavy rain through the night and we're in a lull right now. More to come soon.

                    So last night around 8PM I was in my recliner surfing the net (probably here) (I have a computer connected to the 4K TV, very nice). I heard the cat door bang and the thud of heavy cat feet and (just as he leapt) I was able to tense up before our black kitty (who is pretty hefty) pounced right into my middle.

                    He was SOAKED! But he knew just what to do: flop down on me and dry off luxuriously on my sweatshirt. Then I was soaked.

                    He has very thick fur and I doubt he ever felt wet at the skin level. That fur did a great job of transferring the wetness to me.

                    Then he cuddled up and purred for a while, then (as he does) said "OK, tnx, bye" and off he went. Just like a cat.

                    -js
                    That is good news, now here's to hoping you have a wet, nasty, west coast winter ahead...... Your reservoirs could use a long slow filling.
                    If it wasn't done the hard way, I didn't do it.

                    Lillooet
                    British Columbia
                    Canada.

                    Comment


                    • First off I swapped out the hold downs from my old tonneau cover to the new one. Everytime I flip the new one up, the hold downs poke into the tarp and it's only a matter of time before it poked a hole in it. There was no way to snap them up like my old one. It was an easy swap of the whole crossmember.
                      "new"


                      old (good one) being cut out of old cover



                      All is right in the world again. Those things have been bugging me for a couple months wince getting the new cover, just haven't got around to doing it.

                      Comment


                      • And the reason that i finally broke down and fixed it was that I went and picked this guy up this morning and almost poked a hole in my new cover due to the dumb hold down design. I wrecked my last cover when when the blacksmith leg vise I bought poked a hole in it. Kinda soured the deal a bit....

                        A Japanese Jet 13r from the originally owner from the early 80's. Really nice and tight, and in pretty good shape aside from the minor arc of shame and slight surface rust.

                        Looks good in it's temporary home at the end of the welding bench.


                        Also got the corner cleaned up a bit more in preparation for the move. I gotta move the mill out to get the heater up in place, and that means I'm going to be shuffling some machines around.....not looking forward to it, but it will be better in the long run. I think.

                        Comment


                        • Just spent the afternoon setting up my new MacBook Air laptop. This new one is far more powerful than and lot faster than the old one. Why they have to keep changing things I will never know. It appears that they think they are improving the system every time they come out with new ones, NOT
                          _____________________________________________

                          I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                          Oregon Coast

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by lugnut View Post
                            Just spent the afternoon setting up my new MacBook Air laptop. This new one is far more powerful than and lot faster than the old one. Why they have to keep changing things I will never know. It appears that they think they are improving the system every time they come out with new ones, NOT
                            Ain't that the truth!

                            We are being forced to change over from conventional telephone systems to Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP) by the outfit that owns all the telephone exchanges and can't be bothered maintaining the current switching gear. That means I have to buy a new router, new house and shed telephones which will work with the new router, and a new burglar alarm.

                            Because we have no mobile coverage at home I have a small gadget from my Internet Service Provider (ISP) that works via the Internet to act as a sort of mini cell-tower. And of course, the ISP (Vodafone, since you ask) is discontinuing that service too, in favour of a similar one that will work directly off the router without the intermediary gadget—and as my old iPhone cannot cope with that, I will have to get a new mobile phone as well.

                            So I have absolutely no control over the fact that I'm up for something well north of two grand, just to stay in touch with the world. BAH!

                            On a happier note, I am typing this on a new computer which brings my emails up in about two seconds instead of two minutes. A new one of those too? Well, the old one was a whole eight years old, and was condemned to death by the bloke in town who fixes its occasional hiccoughs. Apparently it's too old to be updated to modern software, and gave itself a hernia trying. Eight years!

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Mike Burch View Post

                              ... to Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP) ... That means I have to buy a new router, new house and shed telephones which will work with the new router, and a new burglar alarm.
                              ...
                              Are you sure about needing new phones? We have VOIP (Vonage) and its router has a jack for the in-house phone wiring. The house wiring gets plugged into the router and all our old phones work off it just like they always have.

                              Comment


                              • A lot. Mostly welding. No gouging this time. Got dad's truck bed back on. Long mod list for it.
                                • Gouged off the headache rack, dad didn't like it.
                                • Gouged the headache rack off of his old bed.
                                • Welded the old rack to the new bed.
                                • Gouged off the old bumper.
                                • Gouged off what was left of the left side rub rail, it was cut to pieces to put in 4 filler neck holes.
                                • Replaced the rub rail.
                                • Welded up all four filler neck holes.
                                • Added stake pockets to the rear.
                                • Added a rear rub rail.
                                • Patched 3 holes in the frame.
                                Overall, it looks pretty good. Not 100% factory, but not bad.

                                Instead of the bed hitch, we made a frame mounted one using the original brackets. I think it's plenty strong.

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                                I did try some 7024s at TTT's recommended settings. Did alright, but not as good as TTT. But, at least that rod sits well without getting wet. I did finally get good results with 7014. Slag self peeling and no voids. So that is nice. I love the way that rod starts, much better than 7018 for me. Hitch was 98% mig, bed welding about 50% stick. I could have done everything without the mig, but definitely not without the miller 330. That thing is worth it's weight in copper.
                                Last edited by The Metal Butcher; 10-24-2021, 12:53 AM.
                                21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                                1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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