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  • Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

    Tell your boss you want a wide floor squeegee for Xmas.
    squeegee no problem, we just didn't have the time. Not that it matters anyway, the floor is so rough you could use it in a movie.
    Got my Xmas from them already, they are gonna be teaching me Kenworth/Cummins on the company dime.
    nickel-city-fab
    Senior Member
    Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 11-30-2021, 08:39 PM.
    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

    Comment


    • Both trucks had decent (not great) 318 motors. But the old one had a slipping trans and a parking sprag that sounded like a frog on acid.
      The new truck has no glass or dashboard, but cloth seats (soaking wet). Also has one good tire.

      BTW they didn't want the thing welded -- the wanted it bolted. Thats why it was such a huge PITA. Had to save all the original plow frame parts, wiring harness etc etc, and make them fit the new truck.

      Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post

      Working on plow trucks is fun.....if you are a sadist. Look on the bright side, At least you got paid to work on it.

      For those of you in warmer climates who don't know what a plow truck is, it's a vehicle that should have went to the scrap yard 5 years ago, but was spared the crusher because it runs ok enough, and the frame contains just enough weldable metal to attach a plow to. . It lives out the rest of its days being beat to death with zero regard for maintenance, and every repair thereafter is completely cobbled together to get it through the next snowfall until it is forgot about. It's used and abuse until there is just not enough metal left to weld together or a rod goes through the block, then the plow is cut off and welded to a new victim.

      If the radio works it's a bonus. If the heater also works you just might have the most luxurious plow truck around and neighbors might consider you yuppy city folk. .
      nickel-city-fab
      Senior Member
      Last edited by nickel-city-fab; 11-30-2021, 08:50 PM.
      25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

      Comment


      • Job from hell, the customer drawing describes a 2.376"- 2.377" bore that is 11.812 inches deep to a flat bottom.
        Not asking for much.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Bented View Post
          Job from hell, the customer drawing describes a 2.376"- 2.377" bore that is 11.812 inches deep to a flat bottom.
          Not asking for much.

          I would have been very tempted to make a one-off reamer. How did you do it? Lots of spring passes? Carbide bar?
          25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

          Comment


          • Unless there is a separate tolerance for sharp edge radii and fillets, you could probably get away with anything reasonable. I think a CAD monkey just used three decimal places as default for the equivalent non-critical fractional dimensions. The bore diameter seems to be the only critical dimension - probably a sliding fit for a 2.375" diameter mating piece.
            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
            Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
            USA Maryland 21030

            Comment


            • Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post


              I would have been very tempted to make a one-off reamer. How did you do it? Lots of spring passes? Carbide bar?
              Not done yet and it will likely take 10 hours to finish my part of it.
              There is also a 3/8" wide X 3/16" deep keyway 11" in to the blind bore which someone else has to do (-:
              As an added bonus the material is 304 SS

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Dan Dubeau View Post

                Working on plow trucks is fun.....if you are a sadist. Look on the bright side, At least you got paid to work on it.

                For those of you in warmer climates who don't know what a plow truck is, it's a vehicle that should have went to the scrap yard 5 years ago, but was spared the crusher because it runs ok enough, and the frame contains just enough weldable metal to attach a plow to. . It lives out the rest of its days being beat to death with zero regard for maintenance, and every repair thereafter is completely cobbled together to get it through the next snowfall until it is forgot about. It's used and abuse until there is just not enough metal left to weld together or a rod goes through the block, then the plow is cut off and welded to a new victim.

                If the radio works it's a bonus. If the heater also works you just might have the most luxurious plow truck around and neighbors might consider you yuppy city folk. .
                You forgot the stack of Timmie's empties tossed in the back and the pack of darts within easy reach.
                Cayuga, Ontario, Canada

                Comment


                • When I lived in North Yorkshire in the UK, the road authority had 6 Mack 6x6 ex American Army trucks with snow plough blades fitted. When the modern snow clearance stuff couldn't cope, it was time to fire up the Macks. They would shift anything! They still had the original petrol engines, so did about 1 mile per gallon when ploughing, maybe about 2 mile per gallon when just travelling. Very basic cabs, one at least only had a canvas roof, no heaters, no power steering, no synchromesh on the gears. The guys who drove them were all old, and had driven such things when they were in the army in 1944, so were used to them. When they, and the fitters who maintained them retired, and the supply of spare parts dried up, the Macks had to go. The younger drivers didn't want to know.
                  'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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                  • Probably couldn't double de-clutch!
                    West Sussex UK

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post


                      I would have been very tempted to make a one-off reamer. How did you do it? Lots of spring passes? Carbide bar?
                      Time and a 1 1/2" diameter boring bar hung out 12", it was not pretty, it took over 8 hours.

                      Comment


                      • We have very small turning steels to machine small holes. The manufacturer is the company Horn. For these tools you need a special holder, which you can buy for a lot of money.
                        I have made myself such a holder.
                        It consists of two parts and was soldered together with tin solder. The inner contour was sawed with a saw blade and the central web was broken out. This part was soldered into a hole and the rest was turned off. Two more threads for two grub screws and the part was finished.

                        This is what these turning tools look like.
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                        This is the holder with its mounting slot.
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                        Many greetings from the southwest of Germany.
                        Bruno
                        http://www.mueller-bruno.de

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                        • Another picture from it.
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                          Many greetings from the southwest of Germany.
                          Bruno
                          http://www.mueller-bruno.de

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Bented View Post

                            Time and a 1 1/2" diameter boring bar hung out 12", it was not pretty, it took over 8 hours.
                            ... that thing probably cost 2 weeks of my pay ...
                            ("Its huge.", she said)
                            25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                              Took the plow frame off a 20-yr-old dodge truck (going to the crusher)
                              put the same plow frame on a 14-yr old dodge truck.
                              Both are "yard trucks", never going on the road again.

                              Tooling involved torch, sledge, 7-ft pinch bar (made of 1-1/4" octagon stock)
                              floor jack, drift pins, and new words. Boss wanted it today, was given the job at 9 AM.
                              The snow is melting tomorrow, but that doesn't matter: I'm already drenched from rolling around on the shop floor while it melted.

                              Job is done, BTW. I'm soaking in a hot bath. Laters.
                              Now you understand why I left Erie for mid Mississippi Yesterday I was bitching about being cold in the garage at 62 degrees F.
                              “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                              Lewis Grizzard

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post

                                ... that thing probably cost 2 weeks of my pay ...
                                ("Its huge.", she said)
                                The next larger bar that we have is 2 1/4" in diameter, it needs a minimum 2 3/4" rough hole to pass into.
                                It is also very heavy and I am lazy (-:

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