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  • Update on the Tig brazing deal:
    I'm getting closer to doing the real thing, which will be brazing on bronze and then turning threads on a shaft it to meet/match a 1-1/8"-12 section.
    I grabbed a piece of 1" brass and put some corn cob holders on each end ( see the picture). Its sitting on the motor stand with the tig torch zip tied to a cheap indicator holder.
    That lets me rotate the corn cob with one hand while I feed wire with the other hand, and the tig torch stays at the optimal distance.
    I went alright- I started with 3/32 silicon bronze like last time, lots of soot and brushing it off like last time.
    I found in my box of filler wires a short length of Harris 15 filler and tried that for filling in the voids.
    I haven't used it before, but It really wets out great- way better than silicon or phosphor bronze, no soot either.
    Now and then I find them discarded in the neighborhood, which is crazy considering what a new tube costs.
    Threading went fine, next is the real thing!
    Attached Files

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    • Originally posted by Tillie's in a bottle View Post
      ...
      a short length of Harris 15 filler ...
      Now and then I find them discarded in the neighborhood, ...
      I am very sure that I will not read anything stranger than that today. Or this week, month, ...

      Nice work on the threads. And if you have a little void (), you can always put a dab of filler on it - no one will ever know.

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      • Well my neighborhood is a commericial area, there is always some plumbing or hvac work going on not too far away.
        I found the leftovers of three of these rods in a couple of years. They're basically at least five dollars for a 20" rod.
        It's great stuff, really wets out and flows. This would be what I would use if I the bronze to flow under and between two parts. With O/A can make phosphor bronze flow decently, with tig brazing it's a little stiff even at 50 - 65 amps.

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        • Setting up, installing security cameras

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          • Finished installing the backup camera and monitor on a Kubota RTV. The camera mount pictures are earlier in this thread so this is the monitor install. For now at least, I made a bracket and swivel mount by milling a little off a German Rowi photography swivel so the monitor could be in the down position to back up to a trailer or whatever. It can be flipped up out of the way to increase forward vision. This was done to keep the regular rear view mirror. If it turns out I don't need the rear view mirror, I can move the monitor up to the mirror position and just use it to see behind. I have to see what my help thinks as I am not the only one to use the machine.

            Backing up to trailer hitch.

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            Monitor up position.

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            Swivel

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            • Finally re-installed the LMS Carriage Lock on my 7x16 mini lathe, but this time on the right side of the carriage:

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              I milled about 4mm off of the "back" side of the top portion of the lock to clear the gibbing set screws and the head of my cross-slide locking screw, drilled & tapped the carriage and presto: I can now access the carriage lock with ease.

              I had added my own version of a lock (activated by the rod that can be seen to the right in the above photo; this will be removed when I get a chance) and added Lexan™ swarf shields a while back:

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              The left shield is attached to the head with a par of magnets, and I made three different length shields that attach to the carriage. There is a strip of rubber glued to the left shield which seals the gap between the two shields.
              Avid Amateur Home Shop Machinist, Electronics Enthusiast, Chef, Indoorsman. Self-Proclaimed (Dabbler? Dilettante?) Renaissance (old) Man.

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              • 21 parts in 316 SS drilled 5/8" dia. X 6.13" deep, a complete PIA

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                • ChazC I hate the idea of magnets to attach the shield....but that's just because I used a few and now every damn thing attracts the chips! But the concept of the shield not being attached firmly appeals. The issue I had with a shield made of aluminium sheet screwed to the travel rest mounting holes was that if you're not really paying attention, it's easy to power feed it into the headstock and then you can't disengage the power feed because of the pressure. The e-stop has been my friend on more than one occasion!

                  Bented That's what, 10D in marine stainless? Fun. I plan to use mine as glorified nails - apparently green oak (new sleepers) just rusts pretty much anything else. Bar stock cut to length is cheaper than buying the (long) A4 screws!

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                  • Had a nice little revision on a checking fixture to do. Started yesterday @ lunch, finished today @ lunch. The upper corner of this stamping moved in about 1mm. That meant we were material shy, and it either needed welding, or cut out and replace a new block. In this case I decided cut out/replace was a better repair than welding. I overlayed the old/new, decided where my cut lines were going to be, designed the "new" block and cut it. Then I cut out the corner of the old block, and machined my new mating surfaces on it.

                    Pretty standard job around here, but I did get to do some double vise po boy 3+2 machining for the pocket of that B1 datum. I scribed my reference marks in another setup while cutting the block from the side (it was an undercut from the 1st op top), then setup up the double vise and dialed in the tiny face with a DTI. Then I picked up my little 0.01" prick point with a pointed edgefinder, picked up the 2nd dot, to figure out the rotation of my setup via the readout (I didn't want to align the bottom vise again, this is just as easy sometimes), and rotated my setup in CAM to the block orientation in the vise and cut the pocket.

                    Tough to see but there are 2 tiny dots make with a sharp scriber tip inside that rectangle, that I use to sink the point of a pointed edgefinder in for my 0,0 in this setup.


                    The result is a nice tight press fit on the net pad (walked it in with cutter comp). I drill a through hole in the back so I can punch it out to grind it in when it goes through CMM. Our CMM guy is away next week, so if he doesn't get to it tomorrow, I'll finish that on Monday too.



                    This job wasn't built by us initially (china) so I had no info on it, just the physical fixture to go by. Would be nice to anodize it black to match, but there's no time, they need it back.

                    Here's a shot of the actual part on the fixture to kinda of give reference as to what is what.



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                    • Have a project that takes me out of the shop. This project has created a certain amount of added responsibility and causes the corners of my mouth to turn upwards. Frequently. A border collie pup.
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                      • Cenedd Yes, they do attract steel, but as they are located against the headstock they are usually far enough away from the cutting zone that it's not bad. Also, they are only 1/16" x 3/8"Ø and embedded in the shield, so not that strong: a quick brush and everything except dust is gone:

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                        Cutout on the left is for the splash guard mounting screw.


                        The rubber "seal" helps keep chips away from the magnets, too:

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                        I made the shield(s) in two parts specifically to avoid crashing the one attached to the carriage into the headstock. The thumbnuts make it easy to put a longer shield in place as needed (I made three) or to mount a follow rest. The shields are positioned high enough to clear my travel stop and the one attached to the headstock is short enough to clear the jaws of my 4" 3-Jaw (but I still need to remove it when using the faceplate).
                        Avid Amateur Home Shop Machinist, Electronics Enthusiast, Chef, Indoorsman. Self-Proclaimed (Dabbler? Dilettante?) Renaissance (old) Man.

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                        • Originally posted by Ironbearmarine View Post
                          ...
                          A border collie pup.
                          ...
                          Cute! Everybody should have a dog, 2 are better.

                          Now what you're gonna' need is a few sheep to keep him/her occupied & out of trouble

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                          • I bought 100' of #12-3 UF -B cable at Lowes for $0.67/foot. It was on clearance, and I got the last of the roll. That's about half price.

                            https://www.lowes.com/pd/12-3-UF-Wir...e-Foot/3345394
                            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                            Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                            USA Maryland 21030

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                            • Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post

                              Cute! Everybody should have a dog, 2 are better.

                              Now what you're gonna' need is a few sheep to keep him/her occupied & out of trouble
                              No kidding! We have a 1 year old mix with some border collie and she's a handful. Super smart, loves heading everyone, including our other dog and the cats. Lots of fun too
                              You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 3 photos.

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                              • Made a couple of chuck keys for two Bison chucks I have on eBay
                                You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 2 photos.

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