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  • Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
    Depending on where the door stop is located, it may be safer to use a spring rather than a rigid post:

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt...5582/202033976

    All these are in places that the walls need protection but due to the room arrangement you’re not walking near them. In fact the one in the living room was solid


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    • finally got round to making an adapter to use my Milwaukee M18 batteries in my Black & Decker tools. Mainly for the yard tools, but it'll be a boon for the circular saw and sawzall too.





      looks a bit shonky, but as long as it works I don't care! 3D file for the adapter was off Thingiverse I think, downloaded it long enough ago that I can't remember.

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      • I got 12 solar heaters installed and have 6 more to go. I'm using a thermal switch (100 deg ON, 85 deg OFF) in a black box that automatically turns on the pumps to the solar heaters when the sun is shining.

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        • Installed? You mean they just lay on the ground?

          Nice house by the way. I miss the big trees in the North. But not the snow.

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          • Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
            Installed? You mean they just lay on the ground?

            Nice house by the way. I miss the big trees in the North. But not the snow.
            I built a thermal switch to turn a filter pump on when the sun is shining and pump pool water through the solar heaters. It's amazing how well solar water heaters work. Even with just a little bit of sun the temp coming from the solar heaters is 2-3 higher. We're going to get a custom heated gunite in ground pool+spa built but the kids love setting up the Intex pools so haven't bothered yet plus we have other summer places so not sure where we'll be spending most of the summer months.

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            • Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
              Even with just a little bit of sun the temp coming from the solar heaters is 2-3 higher.
              That would put the water temperature around 200-300*F down here this week.
              I took the day off and staying inside. Another 100+ day is expected.

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              • Maybe stainless will hold up better.


                *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                • Did you bend that rim on the bottom picture, or did you weld it? Looks great either way.
                  At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                  Location: SF East Bay.

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                  • I'm not really setup to weld stainless. I just did it on my bending brake. 22 gage stainless. Roughed it with a nibbler until the nibbler quit working, and switched to aviation snips.

                    I've got a MIG I use for mild and medium steel and for aluminum, but never did stainless with it. The next time I am cash flush I plan to pick up a nice AC/DC Pulse TIG for that sort of work. I was looking at Everlast, but the local Praxair store is talking "deal" on an inverter type Lincoln. The shelf price isn't much more. I buy my supplies there and they don't hold it against me that I bought my 212 from IOC.
                    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                    • I actually did this on Friday - more work on the overgrown meadow at the top of the hill behind my house:







                      Making that cut was a bit risky because it is on a steep slope and there is a chance that it could roll down into the busy road. It happened to me once before, and luckily did not hit a vehicle. I did take the precaution of placing a few shorter logs to stop it, but that is not infallible. It will be tricky to safely move the cut logs down to where I can split them for firewood.
                      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                      USA Maryland 21030

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                      • Notch near the proposed cut and a rope on it. You can get away with not doing that 77.4% of the time, but...

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                        • I have thought about building a log flume or timber slide of some sort. But that's a lot of work for only a few logs. What I might do is set up a winch and wrestle the logs onto a cart so I can let them down safely to the access road. It's only about 100 feet and about 30 feet of elevation. Even better would be to fix the upper access road so I can get my truck up there. But these logs are about 30 feet down from the top of the meadow so I'd have to first pull them up and then haul them down. It's too steep to safely drive my truck down to where they are, even with 4WD, unless I used a winch. The hill is mostly very deep, soggy topsoil, so anything less than a track vehicle would be dicey.
                          http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                          Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                          USA Maryland 21030

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                          • Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                            I have thought about building a log flume or timber slide of some sort. But that's a lot of work for only a few logs. What I might do is set up a winch and wrestle the logs onto a cart so I can let them down safely to the access road. It's only about 100 feet and about 30 feet of elevation. Even better would be to fix the upper access road so I can get my truck up there. But these logs are about 30 feet down from the top of the meadow so I'd have to first pull them up and then haul them down. It's too steep to safely drive my truck down to where they are, even with 4WD, unless I used a winch. The hill is mostly very deep, soggy topsoil, so anything less than a track vehicle would be dicey.
                            Cut them to firewood length where they lay, then move them, either before or after splitting them. It will be much safer. Unless you have hundreds of logs this will be the best way to handle them. It will also take the place of going to the gymnasium for exercise.

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                            • Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                              I actually did this on Friday - more work on the overgrown meadow at the top of the hill behind my house:
                              Looks like they would make great spreader dams right where they lie.
                              *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                              Comment


                              • added new clip ends to some jumper cables made out of welding wire and a 2” hitch up from 1 7/8 on a homemade dump trailer. Overall built pretty well and a good deal for 200 imho
                                "Good judgment comes from experience, and often experience comes from bad judgment" R.M.Brown

                                My shop tour www.plastikosmd.com

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