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  • #61
    Did one transformer, [ no pics ] and set up for the next. Milled the broken terminal back to clean up, cut a piece of 2" x 1" copper bar for a new terminal then put it on hold until they decide to issue an order number.



    Setup on the POS Bridgy with horizontal head because it's too tall to sit on the bed.




    Then as a change from motors they sent me a pump with the bearing housing gone right down inside.

    Goody gumdrops.



    Bearing is 85mm diameter.
    Bore housing out to 90mm, whack a sleeve into it made from the rings off the railings from outside Huddersfield town hall [ true ] and rebore back out to 85mm.



    Took an hour, jobs a good un and I can have another cup - a - soup.

    Tomorrow I have 18 motors to convert from 90 frame to 80 frame .................. sigh...........................
    Last edited by John Stevenson; 03-23-2010, 05:18 PM.
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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    • #62
      Yeah...you sigh all the way to the bank, Sir John! Don't you know that capitalism is so...passe'?

      David
      David Kaiser
      “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
      ― Robert A. Heinlein

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      • #63
        Got my oxy and Acet tanks exchanged over the weekend.

        Made a stack of widgets over the last month for a project in progress.
        Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

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        • #64
          Removed the broken glass from a ship's porthole. Yes, it was lathe work

          These are often held into the (gunmetal) frame with a very slim gunmetal ring which is threaded inside the frame, & just two shallow 45 degree notches to grip the ring.
          Been assembled for 79 years so some reluctance to come unscrewed....
          It's the 'opening light' type, so removed the hinged frame from the boat, just held with a hinge pin, & held it in the 3-jaw in the lathe. Ground up the ends of two pieces of 3/8" Silver Steel/Drill rod to fit into the notches in the ring. Drilled 2 x 3/8" holes in a piece of 1" Square RHS to hold the pegs at the right spacing, silver soldered to hold them in place. Pressed the 'key' into place with the tailstock, then heated the outside of the frame where the ring is screwed in. Then some judicious blows to the end of the RHS, keep going with that and the heat until there's some movement, it gives in eventually.
          Tomorrow, clean up the frame and fit the new glass (19mm x 260mm dia) with some PU sealant. This is the second of three.

          Tim

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          • #65
            Removed the broken glass from a ship's porthole. Yes, it was lathe work
            In case anyone wondered (or cared) what I was on about, here's a pic of the ring being screwed in above the new glass:-



            Tim

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            • #66
              No cleaning and paint before the new glass install?
              Andy

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              • #67
                Meticulous preservation of the "patina"?
                Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by vpt
                  No cleaning and paint before the new glass install?
                  Paint? Never been painted in its 79 year life.
                  The bit the glass goes into was cleaned meticulously

                  Tim

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                  • #69
                    Big project...... a couple pins for a tension hacksaw frame, so that I can have one with coarse and one with fine blade.... I took my spare to work...

                    (At the moment I am the only EE I know who is working in his field, AND has a stacked roll around toolbox at work. There are two EEs, one fulltime tech, and a programmer, plus call-in extras..... So we do whatever)

                    Other than that, I cut and put in some 1 meter pieces of PVC pipe in my shop raw metal shelves, so that I could get control of storage on different sized rod.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

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                    • #70
                      I sawed 4 27x16" holes in a 4'x6'x.75" sheet of plywood with 35 degree cuts to act as doors. Tomorrow I have to drill 6 4" holes and build up a weather resistant housing down the center to hold 6 12v aerators. Than if I have time I will lay down the first of 3 coats of fiberglass resin on the whole deal.
                      Andy

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                      • #71
                        Let me see:

                        Picked up bowling ball (free) from bowling alley, ordered 3" quick acting vise from Sears, and picked up 6" PVC flange from HD. Ready for a ball vise I've thought about for a while.

                        Reassembled head of my little Craftsman 101 lathe after cleaning and inspecting.

                        Finished installing UHMW skid pads inside of telescoping square tubes for shop-built gantry crane. Project now about 1/2 done.

                        Oh yeah, bought SWMBO a new car.

                        SHE gets $25,000 and I get $35. Sometimes things just don't seem to add up.

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                        • #72
                          Most of what I did today was to work on my [expletives deleted] truck. It's an 88 chevy, and the crossover pipe rotted off at the manifold. Of course that meant replacing the bolts on the manifold, and they were, of course, seized and eroded. On the first side I tried heat and ended up nowhere, and wound up with something of a mess before I ended up drilling. On the second side, I cut to the chase, sheared them clean, ground and drilled, and that went much faster. Still it took hours of drilling and torching and cussing. Anyway, today it was the day to finish threading the holes and putting the damn thing together. Over the course of this job I've broken more drills than I'd care to admit, one tap which I had to burn out of the hole, cut myself, gotten a shard of hot rust in one eye despite the goggles, burned my lip with a blob of molten metal, had an acetylene regulator fail in the middle of the job, lost tools, had a cordless drill go up in smoke and the cord on another break, and I've probably forgotten a few other things. All this upside down and on my back in the dirt, of course, since the truck isn't a comfortable fit in the shop.

                          You know, they could have used pressed in studs on that manifold, the way my Jeeps do, and the whole job would have taken 45 minutes instead of three days.

                          On the positive side, though, I was reluctant to buy new graphite rings for the job at 16 bucks apiece, and figured I'd look around my place for something. A few years ago an old friend died, and left much of his lifetime collection of junk to be picked over by a large assortment of friends and neighbors. I was a latecomer to the party, missing out on the Porsche, the flattie Jeeps and military trucks and the backhoe and the Lull loader etc. etc., but still got loads and loads of interesting bits and pieces. Sure enough, one of the things I had in the barn was a big string of exhaust sealing rings, and among them, a brand new pair of the right ones for my truck. Some old friends never really die.

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                          • #73
                            One more shelf put up in the garage. Now I can't walk through it again. Won't be able to get back in there until Monday.

                            Got the basement clean though. Puppies come on Saturday, and I can actually move down there so I can get to MY computer.

                            Monday is the big day, hang one more shelf, move everything from the floor to the said shelves. Build press table, move press, start working on my die set. That and borrow the tablesaw so I can make a bunch of small organizer drawers for the lathe area, and all of my small fasteners. I'm going to have a functional garage yet. I also have to move the welding area to the other side of the garage at some point (next week) and set up a material rack. No more random pieces of steel strewn about the shop!!!

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                            • #74
                              Originally posted by bruto
                              Most of what I did today was to work on my [expletives deleted] truck. It's an 88 chevy, and the crossover pipe rotted off at the manifold. Of course that meant replacing the bolts on the manifold, and they were, of course, seized and eroded. On the first side I tried heat and ended up nowhere, and wound up with something of a mess before I ended up drilling. On the second side, I cut to the chase, sheared them clean, ground and drilled, and that went much faster. Still it took hours of drilling and torching and cussing. Anyway, today it was the day to finish threading the holes and putting the damn thing together. Over the course of this job I've broken more drills than I'd care to admit, one tap which I had to burn out of the hole, cut myself, gotten a shard of hot rust in one eye despite the goggles, burned my lip with a blob of molten metal, had an acetylene regulator fail in the middle of the job, lost tools, had a cordless drill go up in smoke and the cord on another break, and I've probably forgotten a few other things. All this upside down and on my back in the dirt, of course, since the truck isn't a comfortable fit in the shop.

                              You know, they could have used pressed in studs on that manifold, the way my Jeeps do, and the whole job would have taken 45 minutes instead of three days.

                              On the positive side, though, I was reluctant to buy new graphite rings for the job at 16 bucks apiece, and figured I'd look around my place for something. A few years ago an old friend died, and left much of his lifetime collection of junk to be picked over by a large assortment of friends and neighbors. I was a latecomer to the party, missing out on the Porsche, the flattie Jeeps and military trucks and the backhoe and the Lull loader etc. etc., but still got loads and loads of interesting bits and pieces. Sure enough, one of the things I had in the barn was a big string of exhaust sealing rings, and among them, a brand new pair of the right ones for my truck. Some old friends never really die.


                              I've had to do exactly that a few times now but at least on a lift. One was our 94 turbo 7.3 ford diesel, had to replace the pass. side manifold. It was literally a ball of rust when I started, I had to chisel rust to find bolt heads or where they were supposed to be.
                              Andy

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                              • #75
                                I bought a surface grinder. lol I'm up to 6 machines now.

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