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  • Finished up putting a 1 inch plus hole through 220 small pieces of aluminum sheet today. I started the deburring-
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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    • Originally posted by mickkell View Post
      I welded the door up on my Powder Coating Oven Project and in the process manages to arc thru the sheet metal, thru my glove and into my Finger. Ever been bit by 110V, kinda like that only more Blood.
      One time our crew was salvaging the electrical service to an abandoned farm yard and I was climbing the transformer pole to disconnect the hot line clamp from the 14,400 kv OH line and strip what I could before the digger truck pulled up to remove the 3 1/2 kva transformer. I could have climbed to the top first and worked my way down but the service cables are a bit of a pain to remove that way so I decided to start at the meter/breaker box and work upwards and let them hang from the top. Halfway up as I was using a large screwdriver to pry out the 2 1/2" staples that held the service cable to the pole, the staple I was forcing out was a little tougher to get out and my screwdriver shank cut through the old cloth wrapped insulation and an arc resulted between one of the hot legs and the concentric neutral. I of course had my hand over the staple to catch it so it wouldn't get lost in the tall grass below and as luck would have it I had a small wear hole through the middle finger tip of my gauntleted glove. The arc was large enough that it blew through the hole in my glove, followed my finger and wrapped around it and continued onwards towards the glove's cuff. It singed all the hair off the back of my hand...
      Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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      • Too close, dude!!! I'll pray that doesn't happen again!

        Ouch.

        Pete
        1973 SB 10K .
        BenchMaster mill.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Arcane View Post
          One time our crew was salvaging the electrical service to an abandoned farm yard and I was climbing the transformer pole to disconnect the hot line clamp from the 14,400 kv OH line and strip what I could before the digger truck pulled up to remove the 3 1/2 kva transformer. I could have climbed to the top first and worked my way down but the service cables are a bit of a pain to remove that way so I decided to start at the meter/breaker box and work upwards and let them hang from the top. Halfway up as I was using a large screwdriver to pry out the 2 1/2" staples that held the service cable to the pole, the staple I was forcing out was a little tougher to get out and my screwdriver shank cut through the old cloth wrapped insulation and an arc resulted between one of the hot legs and the concentric neutral. I of course had my hand over the staple to catch it so it wouldn't get lost in the tall grass below and as luck would have it I had a small wear hole through the middle finger tip of my gauntleted glove. The arc was large enough that it blew through the hole in my glove, followed my finger and wrapped around it and continued onwards towards the glove's cuff. It singed all the hair off the back of my hand...
          A friend of mine USED TO work for the local power company. One day he was up in a bucket truck and hit a hot wire that he should't have even been close to. He told me that it burned all the tires off the truck and the truck needed to be sent back for a full rebuild.

          Brian
          OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

          THINK HARDER

          BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

          MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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          • Today I helped a friend mount some large cabinets that he built in the garage of one of his customers. I do this mainly to keep him (75 years old) from hurting himself. He's supposed to be retired but everyone who finds out that he is a wood worker seems to want him to build cabinets, furniture, toys, etc. I turned down the $50 he offered and instead asked that he pay for my games when we bowl together with some of those "free game" tickets that he gets for free at the bowling alley. They are worth $5 each to me and cost him nothing since he's the darling of his wife's bowling league and all the "girls" give him the free games that they get as prizes. It's a win-win deal from my point of view.

            When I woke from my afternoon nap I continued fine tuning my VFD to get it to stop as fast as possible using DC injection without causing things to unscrew or overheat. Still in progress.

            Dan
            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

            Location: SF East Bay.

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            • Started a project just for the heck of it that is going to test my lathe skills and my Atlas lathe.
              I have a small mill that came with a number of "Y" collets.
              I've decided to make a #3 morse taper (to fit the atlas spindle) "Y" collet chuck.

              So, the tests will be single pointing the 1"-16 male thread for the collet nut.
              Cutting the #3 morse taper.
              Boring the 20 degree internal taper for the collets.

              The thread came out fine. I did it first because I wanted to confirm the thread size before putting all the other work into the part. Probably not the best choice for first operation though. I will likely have to use the collet nut for a clamping surface for a drive dog later.

              Next weekend I will put in a small drawbar thread and then cut the #3 taper between centers. I have cut a couple of #2 tapers previously but they took some blue and hand fitting to get satisfactory. My goal is to cut it better the first time. Might have time to bore the internals to but depends on the honeydo list from SWMBO. We''ll see.
              Bill Pendergrass
              Rotec RM-1 w/Rusnok head
              Atlas TH42 QC10

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              • Well yesterday actually -- finally got around to making a Tangential Tool holder, "borrowed" a few ideas of the web then drew a basic plan and modified it as things developed -- result below !



                Will case harden it when i have the muffle on next.
                Knowledge withheld is knowledge lost

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                • Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
                  Trued the wheel for my sandstone grinder. It was a real PITA, the traditional method says to use an iron pipe but it did not work well at all I thought. So I set up a rest from a piece of plywood and using a cheap T-style diamond truing tool I got the wheel trued. Now to start building jigs.

                  Picture is post cleanup, it was a very dirty job.

                  Nice stone you got.
                  Angle grinder with stone cutting diamond wheel or grinding cup should be pretty fast solution if anyone needs to do heavy-handed shaping for the sandstones
                  Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                  • My Uncle James worked as a lineman until one day he was working in a bucket truck leaning over the side. He contacted a live wire and the current arc traveled down his arm and came out his crotch. Needless to say he had to sit to pee the rest of his life. He died an alcoholic.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by machinejack View Post
                      Needless to say he had to sit to pee the rest of his life.
                      What's wrong with that. I've always heard it called "Canadian Style". No splashing, no dripping, no cleaning. It doesn't make you a man if you dribble all over the place. I actually started it around the mid-80s. I had three daughters and one bathroom without a door lock. (It wasn't my privacy I was concerned about.) I just got used to it and no longer have to worry about hitting the hole in the middle of the night.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                        What's wrong with that. I've always heard it called "Canadian Style". No splashing, no dripping, no cleaning. It doesn't make you a man if you dribble all over the place. I actually started it around the mid-80s. I had three daughters and one bathroom without a door lock. (It wasn't my privacy I was concerned about.) I just got used to it and no longer have to worry about hitting the hole in the middle of the night.
                        I think what he's saying is his uncle didn't have a choice. poor guy.
                        san jose, ca. usa

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                          What's wrong with that. I've always heard it called "Canadian Style". No splashing, no dripping, no cleaning. It doesn't make you a man if you dribble all over the place. I actually started it around the mid-80s. I had three daughters and one bathroom without a door lock. (It wasn't my privacy I was concerned about.) I just got used to it and no longer have to worry about hitting the hole in the middle of the night.
                          I got into that habit after I had a hernia operation. The doctor told me not to lift anything heavy.

                          -js
                          There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

                          Location: SF Bay Area

                          Comment


                          • Speaking of ahhh, what we're speaking of---when I was 17 I had a 1952 Chev with a rather weak battery. I used to bring the battery into the house at night and put a battery charger on it overnight to charge it up. I used to set the battery on a little shelf along the top of the woodbox for our family cookstove. One night I topped of the water in all 3 cells (it was a 6 volt car battery) and left the charger on all night. Next morning I got up, decided to go to town, and went to pick the battery up off the shelf. Unbeknownst to me, the cells had been filled too much and the battery boiled off about a pint of acid, which migrated across the top shelf of the woodbox. I never noticed that the front of my pants had got a bit wet. I bolted the battery back into the car, but about then I was getting some very strange and unusual sensations coming from my nether regions. I ran into the bathroom in the house and dropped my drawers to see what on earth was going on.---NOT GOOD!!! Poor willie looked like he had a sunburn. By that time I had figured out that the wet stuff on the front of my pants was battery acid. Ruined the pants. Ruined my drawers. Gave me a great appreciation for how strong sulfuric acid really was. Happily, willie lived to fight another day, but he sure was red in spots for about a week!!!
                            Brian Rupnow
                            Design engineer
                            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                            • Many years ago our crew was working in a substation hooking up a new transformer when a fellow worker while trying to toss a cut off section of conductor accidentally shorted out a 72 kv line. 72 kv phase to phase/41600 volts to ground with a fault current just over 7ooo amps. One end hit the energized line and the other end hit the steel structure he was standing on. He was fortunate that the main current followed the conductor and not him but some did go through him. There was a small melted spot in the steel where his foot was and it blew a small hole through the very thick sole of his lineman's boot. It was early November and chilly so he was wearing winter underwear, a t-shirt, and a regular shirt on top of that, a down vest and a jean jacket. The arc flash burned off everything on the front from his chin down to his belt and from one side to the other in the 7 cycles it took for the breaker to open. He had some scarring from it too but amazing little considering. Although his jean pants were singed they were intact but his pubic hair was singed off as we found out in the hospital immediately after.

                              I was fortunate in that accident since I was bolting a riser to the other side of the switch we were working on and there were burn marks on the 1/2" bolt I was running the nut on while in the process of connecting the conductor from a transformer to the switch. A few seconds earlier and I would have had one hand on the switch and one holding the conductor to the transformer...worst case scenario since that would have meant possible ventricular fibrillation for me. The current flowed through the conductor I was working on and through the primary windings of the transformer and out again through a second conductor connected to another bushing on the transformer. That conductor was hanging down and touching the transformer case and there was a burn mark there also where some current went to ground. I was standing on a wood ladder 18 feet up so I had enough insulation to protect me.

                              Did I ever mention I was quite happy to retire??
                              Last edited by Arcane; 08-06-2018, 03:43 PM.
                              Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

                              Comment


                              • Arcane, I've known a few lineman over the years and have always had a lot of respect for the job they do, the procedural safety protocol, and of course the inherent risks involved. Your two stories highlight some of the things that can happen and I'm sure you could rattle off a couple more given time.

                                They also reminded me of a news story seen just a few days ago about a woman from southern British Columbia that was lucky to come home alive after an incident while in Mexico.
                                Apparently she was standing on a hotel balcony waving to friends while holding her cell phone. Although she did not make contact with the nearby power lines themselves she did get close enough to have an arc reach out, strike her hand and run through her body. This 27 year old woman was burned extensively and was lucky to have survived this incident. The link below to the short news video of her incident and injuries show graphically how fast and how destructive an electrocution incident can be.

                                https://globalnews.ca/video/4368982/...dent-in-mexico

                                I can well appreciate your happiness in not having to deal with this on a daily basis under what I'm sure are not always ideal situations.
                                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                                Location: British Columbia

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