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  • reggie_obe
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Fixit View Post
    Maybe a different question would be is a strainer needed in a closed loop water system with 90% of the system is PEX tubing in the floor and the rest is copper and brass with the exception of the expansion tank.

    TX
    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris
    I had wondered if that was a requirement of the heating unit. I have a cast iron hydronic system, copper baseboard and copper lines, black iron pipe transition to Cu, no strainer. I'd say no.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Fixit
    replied
    Hi Guys,

    The setup I have the galling problem with is a Stainless Steel "Y" strainer and the copper threaded connectors. I think I have found a brass equivalent to use for the strainer.

    Maybe a different question would be is a strainer needed in a closed loop water system with 90% of the system is PEX tubing in the floor and the rest is copper and brass with the exception of the expansion tank. I've ordered the strainer and it's a few days away but if it's not needed maybe I cancel it and get on with the project. I've just always seen one in the HVAC systems that I've worked on over the years.

    Let me know what you guys think.

    TX
    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • Cenedd
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Copper into steel may have galling etc, but the main issue I have seen is that the steel will corrode like crazy right next to the copper.

    Get a brass or bronze fitting and put it between the two. Brass or bronze will not accelerate rust on steel, and copper gets along fine with brass or bronze, so you avoid the problem. The other way is with a dielectric union.
    Would that still work if it's a loop? I got the impression this was a setup for essentially a radiator embedded in the floor so logically the water will for round that and back rather than being discarded at the end like if you were filling a bath. If it's a loop, you still have an electrolyte (the water with it's dissolved minerals) moving from anode to cathode (or vice versa) and so you still have a galvanic cell leading to corrosion. I have zero knowledge of this in plumbing but for PC water-cooling it's an issue when someone sticks some aluminium in the loop (with the rest being brass and copper). The effect occurs even though the tubing is usually plastic.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Copper into steel may have galling etc, but the main issue I have seen is that the steel will corrode like crazy right next to the copper.

    Get a brass or bronze fitting and put it between the two. Brass or bronze will not accelerate rust on steel, and copper gets along fine with brass or bronze, so you avoid the problem. The other way is with a dielectric union.

    The previous owners of my house re-piped the basement bath with copper, and screwed it directly into the steel supply lines. Every time we used a water tap, about 15 to 25 seconds after the tap was opened, a slug of orange-brown water came through, due to the rusting.

    That bath as a whole was for s***, so we had it completely torn put and re-done. When the pipes were put in, and over the plumbers desperate attempts to convince me otherwise, I made them put in dielectric unions. No more orange water, no problems in the last 25 years.

    Leave a comment:


  • DennisCA
    replied
    Patched a rust hole in the Mazda, me and my dad, he did the welding and sheet metal work, he's the better welder of us. I did the prep work (cutting & cleaning) and post welding stuff. Used a high zinc primer known as cold galvanization primer here, then dinitrol ml which is a penetrating and creeping corrosion protection, then the thicker stuff which will harden to an elastic layer. Still need to spray in dinitrol into the cavity behind the patch.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    IMO copper should be soldered, full stop. Even when the fitting is threaded, it should still be soldered.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Metal Butcher
    replied
    Originally posted by Jerrythepilot View Post
    I've had good luck with the Blue Block pipe dope.
    I've always had good luck with pipe dope. Maybe 1-2 leaks... ever. And usually fixable with a wrench.

    Tef tape on the other hand....

    Leave a comment:


  • Baz
    replied
    It's interesting to see the different standards in other countries. I've never seen a copper threaded fitting llike that - always brass. UK ironnmongers wuld laugh at you for asking for copper. Like those stupid flap valves in toilets and 18th century twin shaft wheelbarrows - there's a wrong way and a right way to do some things.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim The Grim
    replied
    Bob....

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B085SVCT8X...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Fixit
    replied
    Thanks for the suggestions fellas. If anyone is building a new shop and is doing slab on grade, really consider doing this for heat as it was only a few hundred $$ to insulate and install the PEX piping in the concrete pour. I wasn't ready to afford the rest, but at least the base was in place.

    I'm considering looking for a brass strainer to fit the space as Tom S suggests. I'll give the pipe dope a try first, but brass as a backup sounds good. Might report back (if I remember to) when I have results of the installation.

    TX
    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Engelhardt
    replied
    Originally posted by Tim The Grim View Post
    ... new LED Garage lights in the shop. ...
    I like it. Do you have a link for them?

    Leave a comment:


  • Tom S
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Fixit View Post
    I have been working on my shop heat. I built my shop in 2010 and put radiant floor heat PEX piping in the floor when I built it. ON the list to finish but it kept falling down the list.
    Well I left the electric space heater on over night and it does not have a T-stat so it ran over night, I'm not looking forward to the electric bill.

    So I'm getting back on the project. Oh buy the way, I bought the parts in 2017 but again it fell to the bottom of the list.

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    I'm getting closer. I do need to wire it up and fill it with water, then it's good to go.

    I do have a question if you have read this far. The "Y" strainer above the pump is SS and I can't get a thread seal on this with the copper fittings. I've used teflon, and PDFE tape but it still leaks. I've been air testing @ 40psi. What can I use that will get me a good seal? The SS has started to gall the coper but still good threads on the copper.

    TX
    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris
    Nice setup. If I get the opportunity to build a shop from scratch that's probably what I would be looking at to heat the building. Nice even temperatures throughout the building without drafts or ducting, no cold feet from cold floors. Couple small fans up in the rafters so that the heat doesn't gather there. Plus hot water on demand for various things.

    As far as the fitting, I can't stand threaded copper fittings. Go brass and you'll never have this issue. Probably too late now however by the looks of it, changing it out would require a good bit of work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim The Grim
    replied
    I made a quick 2x4 bracket to place some of these new LED Garage lights in the shop. Honestly didn’t expect them to be as effective as they are.
    Now I can machine and get a tan simultaneously.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerrythepilot
    replied
    I've had good luck with the Blue Block pipe dope.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ron43
    replied
    https://www.amazon.com/Oatey-15707-H.../dp/B004EVF88A, My plumber buddy swears by " Block" brand.
    He used it on black iron gas lines in a kitchen remodel for me Pressure stayed for 24 hrs as inspector required. It is tough to get off your hands so it must seal well.
    Ron.

    Leave a comment:

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