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Ever been curious about the submarine TDC?

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  • Ever been curious about the submarine TDC?

    AKA Torpedo data computer.... the mechanical computer that solved the aiming problem and commanded the settings on the torpedos.

    Link to the manual is here...........

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...mputer-200451/
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  • #2
    No, but I've always been really curious as to the depths subs are comfortable at. Seems that this info is strictly taboo!

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    • #3
      Dive depth

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Submarine_depth_ratings

      http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&sour...f33b0d2303fec5

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      • #4
        Since the TDC is super-mechanical, with precision machining to the max, I am surprised so few appear to be interested in it here......
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

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        • #5
          Really enjoyed, thanks for posting

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          • #6
            Originally posted by millwrong
            No, but I've always been really curious as to the depths subs are comfortable at. Seems that this info is strictly taboo!
            Propeller shape is one of the best kept US military secrets. Ours are quiet, theirs are not.

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            • #7
              Fire control

              Don't know about TDCs, but one of the early applications for electronic computing was to replace the mechanical fire control computers for large-gun warships, a similar but probably more complex problem. Torpedos are self-guided. The fire control computer had to account for target and own-ship motion, roll, weight of projectile, barometric pressure, temperature, etc. etc. I've always been amazed by the technology.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by knudsen
                Propeller shape is one of the best kept US military secrets. Ours are quiet, theirs are not.
                I'm not sure how true that is anymore. A Jap company (Sanyo I think) with whom we'd shared some of the machining secrets, turned around and sold (or gave away) that technology to the soviets. The US imposed sanctions, but the cat was already out of the bag.
                This was all related to suppressing signatures visible from space by satellite.
                Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lynnl
                  I'm not sure how true that is anymore. A Jap company (Sanyo I think) with whom we'd shared some of the machining secrets, turned around and sold (or gave away) that technology to the soviets. The US imposed sanctions, but the cat was already out of the bag.
                  This was all related to suppressing signatures visible from space by satellite.
                  They didn't have a 5-axis needed to make the props before then.

                  Many interesting tidbits from the Cold War surrounding submarines. One that piqued my interest were the Russian torpedoes that could travel faster than sound underwater. This made the problem of detecting them all but impossible. They would arrive before sonar could spot them. There was even concern they might be used as a sort of underwater "cruise missile" that could deliver nukes to the shoreline before they could be detected.

                  I remember as a young lad back in junior high hearing about the Russians titanium hulled subs. It was an interesting learning experience to compute the depth at which a cylindrical hull would become heavier than the water it displaced due to the thickness of the hull. Once that happens, you get increasing negative bouyancy, which is a bad thing in a military sub.

                  Bathyscaphes dealt with it by literally using gasoline as a hot air balloon uses hot air to float the crew sphere. In any event, the Russians used titanium largely because it allowed their subs to go almost twice as deep given its strength relative to its weight.

                  Unfortunately, the Alfa class also circulated radioactive reactor coolant to heat the subs, so all that valuable titanium is highly radioactive and not salvageable. This can't be a happy result for their crews either.

                  Cheers,

                  BW
                  ---------------------------------------------------

                  http://www.cnccookbook.com/index.htm
                  Try G-Wizard Machinist's Calculator for free:
                  http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCGWizard.html

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                  • #10
                    "...faster than sound..." Over 650 miles per hour at sea level? I thought that around 30 knots was max for a torpedo.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by lynnl
                      I'm not sure how true that is anymore. A Jap company (Sanyo I think) with whom we'd shared some of the machining secrets, turned around and sold (or gave away) that technology to the soviets. The US imposed sanctions, but the cat was already out of the bag.
                      This was all related to suppressing signatures visible from space by satellite.
                      Huh, after we were their DOD for 50 years. Well, their economy broke; I guess they were hungry. Or the Ruskies sent a hot blond over.

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                      • #12
                        I don't believe a FTS torpedo exists. There are (were?) submarine-launched rockets that dropped their payload - a torpedo - near the target however. Those could be pretty fast.

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                        • #13
                          Yes, all those early fire control devices were very special and very secret. I believe most if not all the WWII devices were straight up mechanical computers. Maybe someone can verify that. The Norden (sp?) bomb sight gave our side a real advantage in precision bombing.

                          Joe B

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                          • #14
                            There are some seriously fast torpedoes though:
                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VA-111_Shkval

                            Igor

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                            • #15
                              http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/7151

                              .
                              .

                              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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