Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1st post - Help to adjust a Friction Clutch?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 1st post - Help to adjust a Friction Clutch?

    Hi, I'm hoping someone has experience with tightening up/adjusting an old lathe friction clutch.

    This is on a '46 Logan 820 that was in a chicken coop for years! Basically a good lathe, but the apron drive barely moves. The clutch knob turns, gets tighter, then loose again, and some carriage feed engages, but not enough to do any work. Should I tear it apart?

  • #2
    You may have better luck getting an answer here: http://www.machinistweb.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=9

    Comment


    • #3
      Hello and welcome!

      My vote is to tear it apart. Although you should be able to adjust those clutches without tearing the whole apron apart, it is probably still a good idea to do so. If it has been in the "chicken coop" for several years, it could use a good cleaning and inspection. This way you will really get to know your machine and will be able to coax the most out of it.

      If you don't have a good memory for mechanical things, make sure you take notes/pictures as you disassemble so you can put everything back together again!

      Comment


      • #4
        To add to what Fasttrack said about notes and pictures, I always put all the fasteners and small bits from the various assemblies in their own ziploc bags and label them so I don't have to hunt all over for which screws hold the saddle to the apron or so I don't wonder where that little spring came from.
        Stuart de Haro

        Comment


        • #5
          I assume that this chicken coop had only 2 doors. If it had 4 doors it would have been a chicken sedan.
          If ignorance is bliss, why aren't there more happy people?

          Comment


          • #6
            Ever loose your chewing gum in the chicken coop and thought you'd found it three times?
            The difficult done right away. the impossible takes a little time.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Fasttrack
              Hello and welcome!

              My vote is to tear it apart. Although you should be able to adjust those clutches without tearing the whole apron apart, it is probably still a good idea to do so. If it has been in the "chicken coop" for several years, it could use a good cleaning and inspection. This way you will really get to know your machine and will be able to coax the most out of it.

              If you don't have a good memory for mechanical things, make sure you take notes/pictures as you disassemble so you can put everything back together again!
              Well, it's in bits now! No problem with mechanical things, excepting not knowing the odd LH thread or what is required to separate the housing on the apron. But I coaxed it apart and all looks good, if a little sludgy.

              The friction clutch is made up of plates alternating between 3 dogeared and some internal teeth. After cleaning this coaster brake, what kinda lube should i put in there?

              Comment


              • #8
                It a Logan 820, right? The bottom of the apron is a resovoir for the oil that bathes the worm/worm gear. The fill port is on front right side of apron. I think Logan called out SAE 20 oil(correct me if that wrong, I'm going from memory).

                As far as adjustment, I recall my clutch engaging with a 10* turn of clutch handle/lever. There are some really small springs in the clutch.
                Do you have a manual? looking at exploded diagram may help, but afair, it is pretty straight forward.
                I bury my work

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Artemetra
                  Well, it's in bits now! No problem with mechanical things, excepting not knowing the odd LH thread or what is required to separate the housing on the apron. But I coaxed it apart and all looks good, if a little sludgy.

                  The friction clutch is made up of plates alternating between 3 dogeared and some internal teeth. After cleaning this coaster brake, what kinda lube should i put in there?
                  I use 80/90 wt. gear oil in mine(820), leaks out slower. when you put it back together use silicone rtv on the halves or it leaks out super fasy.
                  san jose, ca. usa

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The friction clutch on the apron is adjusted by backing off the jam nut and holding the screw with a screw driver and then slightly tightening the back nut. Then tighten the jam nut. Takes two thin wrenches and a screw driver. You might have to play with it awhile to get it where you want it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by gambler
                      I use 80/90 wt. gear oil in mine(820), leaks out slower. when you put it back together use silicone rtv on the halves or it leaks out super fasy.
                      Hmm ... I'm not real familiar with Logan lathes, but I would be inclined to use something along the lines of a 20 or 30 wt machine oil (NOT "motor" oil). But oil is a hot debate subject on this forum ...

                      If leaking is a common problem on this model, rather than going to a heavier oil, I suggest doing some improvements to your apron now that you have it apart. Consider installing/replacing o-rings, gaskets, etc. Sometimes there is not much you can do if you have a really porous casting. Then they just seem to "weep" oil.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hmm ... I'm not real familiar with Logan lathes, but I would be inclined to use something along the lines of a 20 or 30 wt machine oil (NOT "motor" oil). But oil is a hot debate subject on this forum ...
                        I sold my 820 3 months ago so I have no reference manual to go by but I'm sure I wasn't using 80 wt. The apron that came on the machine always leaked oil and I had to go the rtv route. I ended up buying a complete apron/carraige from an 11" model and putting it on my machine.
                        The clutch was tuned up really well and never leaked any oil
                        I bury my work

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Logan 820

                          Go to the Logan web site. They have a wide assortment of replacement parts, and a manual. Mine leaks a bit, but oil is cheap. While you have it apart, it sure makes sense to apply a bit of gasket goo. Duffy
                          Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Duffy
                            Go to the Logan web site. They have a wide assortment of replacement parts, and a manual. Mine leaks a bit, but oil is cheap. While you have it apart, it sure makes sense to apply a bit of gasket goo. Duffy
                            Is the Logan Actuator site the one? Or is there a factory web site? This is what I've found: http://www.lathe.com/ and http://www.loganact.com/ (both look the same).

                            Thanks to all for the info. I've got the friction clutch all cleaned, next is the apron parts. All looks to be in excellent shape.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Fasttrack
                              Hmm ... I'm not real familiar with Logan lathes, but I would be inclined to use something along the lines of a 20 or 30 wt machine oil (NOT "motor" oil). But oil is a hot debate subject on this forum ...

                              If leaking is a common problem on this model, rather than going to a heavier oil, I suggest doing some improvements to your apron now that you have it apart. Consider installing/replacing o-rings, gaskets, etc. Sometimes there is not much you can do if you have a really porous casting. Then they just seem to "weep" oil.
                              Agree with that. do the improvements to seal it up, much better than topping it off and cleaning up the mess all the time

                              My opinion on oil, motor oil is fine as long as the container does NOT have 'energy conserving' in the API seal. Energy conserving in the seal means that it has additives that reduce friction, good for engines, bad for clutches.
                              You have no idea how many motorcycles with wet clutch systems I've had through the garage because of someone using an 'energy conserving' oil. Same with a lot of things that use friction to handle power transmission.

                              Ken

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X