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A reason that old car buffs might want to visit here

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  • #31
    But doesn't that mean that the glass must fit a collectible model for it to be very valuable? If most of those cars have no real collectible value, then why would it be of much value to anybody?
    Any vehicle that age is collectible. My '59 Land Rover is worth over $5000 last time I checked and that is in it's present condition. That was quite a few years ago, maybe I should check again...
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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    • #32
      Now that's surprising, all that Alaskan equiptment rusting away.
      You'd think, with the transportation costs of getting equiptment up there, that the useful life would be greatly extended.

      Out in the Pacific Islands there's still lots of old WW II vehicles still working after numerous patch ups.
      Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Willy

        Unloved Alaskan logging equipment.

        Caution, there are 14 pages to this link so better make a sandwhich and grab drink cause this will take a while!
        wow...one pen stroke....2 mills and millions of $s of equipment..

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        • #34
          I can show you the same thing here in Williams Lake except the equipment is a lot newer and the mills a lot bigger.
          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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          • #35
            I've seen several of these type of wrecking yards. There used to be several here in Spokane when I first moved here 40 years ago. This looks like one of the typical hick farmer, push them in, and stack them wherever, and charge more than what is real for any nut and bolt that came off of them, type of yard.

            I do see some pieces that might be of worth, but the distance, and the labor to retrieve them make it quite questionable as to their value.

            As far as the glass is concerned, flat glass is cheap and its really not worth considering using old glass when costing out a restoration.

            Curved windshields of those vintages are being held in place with rubber so hard and dried up that removing them without cracking the already overly brittle glass is only done nowadays for use as a pattern for a new one.

            The crushing of this collection will be a miner blessing to the sellers of collector car parts that make a real effort in this end of the parts business.

            For what it's worth I would also like to wander through the place. It would be fun to see what might be way back in there.

            And then write it off as impossible.
            Last edited by topct; 03-24-2010, 08:30 PM.
            Gene

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            • #36
              Originally posted by topct
              The crushing of this collection will be a miner blessing to the sellers of collector car parts that make a real effort in this end of the parts business.
              Once these are gone, their gone. Of course, once they are destroyed, the sellers will "make more", but if that's all this is about, count me out.

              It absolutely kills me to see this stuff destroyed. Goes along with the "sanitizing" mentality of the country of "out with the old". The clunker laws they keep trying to pass, etc.

              Sorry, not a personal attack by any means, but it hurts seeing this stuff just go away.....
              ~CHAINZ~
              CHAIN-REAKTION

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              • #37
                Originally posted by peyton
                Ken, what was the justification for that? Old car collections/junkyards might be unsightly (to some) but they are rather benign.

                Peyton
                Think they wanted to drive property values up.

                Several of the townships also passed laws that if you buy property that has buildings over a certain size, you -have- to tear them down. A few larger garages, many old barns and pole buildings went down after the property changed ownership. Was absurd because you could turn around and get a permit (in most places) to build another structure the same size.

                Got wrote up for having my old hobby truck in a lean to, said I either had to get rid of the truck or cover the ends. Since I'm a carpenter and do a lot of remodels, I used old sliding glass doors to cover the ends.
                Also hung car parts and old mag rims and anything else I really needed to find a place for all around the outside of the garage. Called it art, they couldn't touch it.

                Ken.

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                • #38
                  I have visited such places in the past; the usual response to my inquiries was something like " I'm gonna fix that-un up like new, one day" ( referring to the rusted hulk du jour.

                  great pics, tho. There's an old car lot in an older part of my town, that has a ton of old Studebakers (among other '50's cars) rusting away, awaiting "restoration" that will never come. Like Evan says, the crusher will get them, when the lot owner passes. A Shame, really.

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                  • #39
                    Some of you guys may like this short film

                    its in four parts

                    part one

                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=If4TKlPw2Kc

                    all the best.markj

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                    • #40
                      I used to enjoy visiting old New Zealand farms, the big ones, the ones we called 'stations'.

                      A typical high country "station" would have bought their first motor vehicles and tractors about 1910 or so. Cars, trucks motor cycles etc. They never threw anything away or sold it when it was old instead it just got put in a convenient shed or pushed under the trees. They never seemed to have got anything repaired much instead just bought new ones with the old one pushed in beside the one before. I remember one place which must have had ten or more combine harvesters parked in chronological order.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by MrSleepy
                        wow...one pen stroke....2 mills and millions of $s of equipment..
                        You took the words out of my mouth,the wrong guy holding a pen can do more damage than a Hurricane or Earthquake.
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

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