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How Fast For Reamers?

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  • How Fast For Reamers?

    I realize that it depends on the type of material; but should a reamer be turned at the same rpm as say an end mill or drill for the same material? I have tried to find videos showing reamers in action but could not find any. On the other hand, reaming sounds like it should be done at very low rpms...
    Who do I think you are...?

  • #2
    Not perfect, but I use half the speed, twice the feed, for non critical work...

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    • #3
      1/3 to1/2 drill speed works for me are slower.
      Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
      http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
      http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

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      • #4
        Hap,
        What size and material is your reamer and what material is needing reamed?

        I'll check the suggested output in the software I have, usually cut that at least in half to eliminate chatter.
        Some dark sulfur cutting oil also helps.

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        • #5
          Is the reamer turning or the workpiece? One rule of thumb if the reamer is turning you should be able to see the flutes as it turns.

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          • #6
            I was taught, run the reamer at 75% to 100% drilling speed, but double the feedrate.

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            • #7
              I run rifle chamber reamers at about 80 to 140 rpm, depending on the caliber and body diameter. Back out & clear chips every .100". Cutting oil is cheap, reamers & barrels aren't!

              David
              David Kaiser
              “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
              ― Robert A. Heinlein

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              • #8
                A third LESS speed and a third MORE feed than a twist drill of similar size.

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                • #9
                  What about "meat" for the reamer? I normally leave a 1/64, but need to ream some 1 inch holes 4 inches deep, and don't have a 63/64 drill.... but I do have a 31/32 though.

                  Is a 1/32 too much at 1 inch? Feed rate?

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                  • #10
                    Sol from Glacern.com has a vid in his Crash Course series that shows reamer usage. Chapter 9. Great videos, BTW. Dr. Stan has it pretty close.

                    Like many things it is probably very subjective - cost vs yield. Spin it fast, make money on product but spend it on reamers, or go slow to save the reamers and lose some efficiency. Somewhere in between is exactly what you need.

                    Pick one. If you turn them fast you should probably have several on hand.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by lakeside53
                      What about "meat" for the reamer? I normally leave a 1/64, but need to ream some 1 inch holes 4 inches deep, and don't have a 63/64 drill.... but I do have a 31/32 though.

                      Is a 1/32 too much at 1 inch? Feed rate?
                      Machine reamers are end cutting, the flutes are barrel ground and do no cutting, so straight flutes have no top rake and this is what defines how fast they will cut and the feed rate. Imagine that you are taking a 1/64 cut in steel with no top rake and it will give you an idea of what is happening with the reamer. So, yes you can use a 31/32 drill but just take it slowly at reduced revs and use plenty of your favourite cutting fluid.

                      IanR

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                      • #12
                        Lower the revs, tighter the tolerance.

                        Cutting oil also has a part to play, ream one hole with soluble and one with cutting oil and there will be a difference.

                        .
                        .

                        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                        • #13
                          Mhb27

                          See Machinery's Handbook 27 Edition - from page 1060 onward under "Speeds and Feeds".

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                          • #14
                            Don't back them out

                            38 Cal suggests that he backs them out to clea chips which is not recommended practice for reamers as they dull when turned backwards.
                            al
                            I spent most of my money on women and booze, the rest I just wasted.

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                            • #15
                              Why would you turn then backwards to back them out? I just raise the spindle - no reversal.

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