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  • Another Small Production Job

    This happened a few days ago. Building prototypes, found that the coil bobbins needed chamfers on one end to overmold correctly. Coils already made, molder scheduled for the following day, my boss needs the parts overnight. They came to me, sent me to my Home Shop early in the afternoon.

    I made an arbor to fit the bobbins, then set up tooling to chamfer the ID and OD in one operation.

    The OD was easy, just a cutter in the toolpost set to the proper angle. The ID turned out to be easy because I had the Sherline accessory compound that held the tool upside down and worked from the backside of the spindle.

    HSS 1/4" turning tools from Arthur R. Warner (HSS Mike on this BBS)

    214 parts, done before bedtime.
    Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
    ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

  • #2
    Nice job getting the boss out of a jam.
    Those bobbins aren't for a turboencabulator are they?

    Steve

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    • #3
      Originally posted by doctor demo
      Nice job getting the boss out of a jam.
      Those bobbins aren't for a turboencabulator are they?

      Steve
      Close, diesel fuel injectors.
      Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
      ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

      Comment


      • #4
        I tend to bring a lot of work home, but they don't half forget quick! especially if you want something, but i cant help myself, i don't think I'm ever going to be rich!
        mark

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        • #5
          Originally posted by boslab
          I tend to bring a lot of work home, but they don't half forget quick! especially if you want something, but i cant help myself, i don't think I'm ever going to be rich!
          mark
          Actually, if you're like some folks you'll find your rewards start flooding back to you when you least expect it.
          - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
          Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

          It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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          • #6
            Weston, I'm impressed.

            Comment


            • #7
              Hope you're appreciated Weston. I used to take tools home to repair (Overnight) for a firm I once worked for. These were the air operated high speed pencil type grinders that held 3mm Dia. cutters.

              The "Animals" would manage to break the cutters off level with the end of the collet which meant stripping the rotor out of the unit to grip it and unscrew the collet to push the bit out.

              These were normally sent to a tool suplier for "repair" for which they relieved the company of 25 pictures of HRH per shot. MY repairs cost them zilch.

              This was OK untill one day, there were 3 to fix and when I approached the manager to leave an hour early that day, ( My wage at that time was about £6 an hour) I was met with a refusal.

              They got them back a week later and £75 lighter from the "Old" repair firm.

              Didn't do any more repairs in future, wasn't the money originally cos I never got any from it, did it COS I COULD.

              Regards Ian
              You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

              Comment


              • #8
                What goes around comes around. In this case, what comes around needs to go around.

                A year ago, I survived 2 waves of layoffs, and spent much of the summer sitting at my desk working at looking busy because there was nothing to do. They stood by me then. I have no problem doing these small things now.
                Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

                Comment


                • #9
                  Good bit of work there Weston! Looks like your company appreciate an employee that goes the extra mile - a small price to pay to avoid the lay-offs
                  Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                  Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                  Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                  Monarch 10EE 1942

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sometimes companies can be so short sighted. Last job I had as employed I finished up on management, wrong place for me as I'm not management material.

                    I looked after 4 shops with about 38 women and 15 guys all on production of piano parts.

                    Company policy was for doctors visits etc you had to bring proof in before the visit and you could take the time off unpaid. As most of the work was bonus rated basic pay was low.
                    Also because the time clocks could only stamp in and out twice a day, am and pm you had to get your manager to sign your card in and out because of over stamping. It had worked like that for years.

                    When I took over I would get them to bring me their card and just leave it on the desk, unsigned. If they returned in a reasonable time I'd just return it to the rack unmarked and they lost no money.

                    They soon got to know that if they played fair with me, I was fair in return.
                    .

                    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Lost in the discussion about work relationships was the actual machining of the parts.

                      I posted with the intent to demonstrate that the Home Shop Machinist can do more than hobby work, given a little imagination and experimentation. This particular job was done on a Sherline hobby lathe, indeed the work was sized well for the Sherline, but could have been done on most any lathe.

                      I initially thought I would have to do the work in two operations, but some experimentation showed that I could combine the ID and OD work into one pass, cutting my work time in half.
                      Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                      ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Weston,
                        I used to do the same job on some laser cut discs for rollers.
                        They needed a weld prep chamfer OD and ID on 10mm thick plates.

                        I had a hunt round and found a couple of tools that fitted the Dickson quick change holder, one as per normal with the insert at 45 degrees and a similar one set up like a boring bar, also with a 45 degree insert.

                        No pics of the setup but I could do a staged shot later if any one wants.

                        This is a pic of some of the plates when done.



                        I used to get pissed off doing these because I hate production work.

                        Sorry for the hi-jack on the original thread.
                        .

                        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                        Comment


                        • #13
                          They look like washers that could sit on the palm of your hand.

                          Until you see its a forklift!

                          Cheers,

                          BW
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                          • #14
                            So how did you chuck those wafers? Did you have to chamfer both sides?
                            Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                            ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Not really wafers, they are 10mm [ +3/8"] thick, used soft jaws as these were a 200 per month job in about 7 sizes.
                              Inner and outer chamfer one side only to be welded into heavy ? tubes as rollers.
                              Not sure what for as like many jobs i only see part, these were sub con from a laser company.
                              .

                              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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