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Flycutters and brazed carbide.

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  • Flycutters and brazed carbide.

    What type of brazed carbide tool should I buy to mount in a flycutter? as in AL or BL style?
    http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?P...PARTPG=INLMK32
    My flycutters hold the bit at 20 degrees offset.

    Any modifications I should do to the tool form?

    And what carbide grade is recommended for descaleing hot rolled steel? (as in C2 C5 C6)

    Does having a 45 degree lead angle help or hurt when descaleing hot rolled steel?
    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Black_Moons
    .......................
    And what carbide grade is recommended for descaleing hot rolled steel? (as in C2 C5 C6)

    Does having a 45 degree lead angle help or hurt when descaleing hot rolled steel?
    bump

    Can somebody get this man an answer? I'd like to know too. Hope to start making knives out of D2 and the bark on it just kills those 2x72 grinder belts. I have a mill, I'd like to try plaining them instead of grinding it off.
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    • #3
      Use HSS and get below the scale.
      ...lew...

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      • #4
        I use the AL style and I just get those cheapo ones (similar to those at Enco)

        I find that these are, hands down, the best and fastest way to get a piece of that rusty, scale coated chunk I scrounged from the scrap yard cleaned off. Even at that, rust and scale will blunt the edge pretty easily and if I find I have to do several pieces, I may have to touch up the edge on the diamond wheel. I put a sharp corner on and then, free handed, just touch up a slight rounded corned. In my experience, HSS sometimes wouldnt even last thru my first piece before starting to hammer so loudly and give a terrible finish...

        Recently, I finally threw away a tool that had been ground to where there was too little area left to work with -- It had cleaned up many a sq ft of scrap yard steel. I even use these to get that final "mirror finish" I never put a piece of HSS in the tool anymore!
        If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

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        • #5
          This is what I've made. It rips off scale like nobody's business and you can run it a lot faster than a HSS cutter. Also doesn't mind interrupted cuts at all. The stem is turned to fit a 3/4 collet.

          Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

          Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
          Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
          Monarch 10EE 1942

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          • #6
            Fly Cutters

            I use the AL and have found they work best if you grind the point to a radii. The sharp point can't hold up to the interupted cut. HSS works ok on HRS

            Here is some info. I got from the MSC catalog
            C-2 is for Cast Iron and Nonferrous Metals
            C-6 is for steel
            C-5 is good for both
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            • #7
              AL brazed carbide with the leading edge at a 45 deg angle to the work WHEN the cutter is in the flycutter. That means if your flycutter has a 20 deg angle then the leading edge of the cutter in your hand will have a 65 deg angle on it. The angled leading edge cuts much smoother than a 90 deg leading angle.

              As to grade I use C5 or 6 but for the interrupted cut when flycutting a C2 may be better. Although I have never had an issue using C5-6 grade flycutting at 1000+ rpm at fast feeds.
              It's only ink and paper

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              • #8
                Would it be helpful at all if I just told you to buy a [email protected] 45 degree face mill?

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                • #9
                  If I were tooling up to do this on a budget, I truly believe a great deal of money and especially frustration would be saved by getting a inserted face mill.

                  CDCO Tools has a sweet little 2-1/2" 15؛-lead face mill that takes 4 square SPG422 inserts. The integral R8 shank tool costs a whopping $45, plus inserts. Those can be had from a variety of sources in a wide range of grades, coatings and edge preps. The tool will absolutely out-perform any fly cutter, and be more gentle on spindle bearings. Moreover, the inserts can be true milling grades, as opposed to using lathe tools for milling applications.

                  http://www.cdcotools.com/

                  You have to "drill down" a bit from the "Cutting Tools" tab to find that milling cutter.

                  Overall, I think money would be saved and the job would be done so much easier. Myself, I got a Widia 45؛ lead 4-insert 2-1/2" face mill for next to nothing off of Ebay (uses SP43 size inserts), and I couldn't be more impressed at just how easily and quickly it plows through materials. I have fly cutters, they're used rarely, and only to take a wide finish pass.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Peter.
                    This is what I've made. It rips off scale like nobody's business and you can run it a lot faster than a HSS cutter. Also doesn't mind interrupted cuts at all. The stem is turned to fit a 3/4 collet.
                    Peter what insert is that? I may have to make one of those. It looks
                    like a "solution waiting for a problem" to me. :-) I like to build things
                    like that just for the fun of it.
                    ...Lew...

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                    • #11
                      Lew, I was looking at his cutter and was thinking if I made it so I could have the insert mounted on one side at the 90 deg angle on one side and at a 45 deg angle on the other side and use the insert in which ever mounting spot I need it may be a handy tool.
                      It's only ink and paper

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                      • #12
                        Idea

                        Originally posted by Carld
                        Lew, I was looking at his cutter and was thinking if I made it so I could have the insert mounted on one side at the 90 deg angle on one side and at a 45 deg angle on the other side and use the insert in which ever mounting spot I need it may be a handy tool.
                        I like this idea. If you make one post some pics for us
                        I can think of several ways a tool like this could be a time saver
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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Lew Hartswick
                          Peter what insert is that? I may have to make one of those. It looks
                          like a "solution waiting for a problem" to me. :-) I like to build things
                          like that just for the fun of it.
                          ...Lew...
                          Lew they are TNMP 220412 inserts. They are some of the cheapest on eBay:
                          Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                          Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                          Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                          Monarch 10EE 1942

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