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90 Degree belt spin

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  • 90 Degree belt spin

    I would like to run both my wire wheels and my disk sander off the same motor. Unfortunately, the shafts are 90 degrees to each other.

    Can I do a 90 degree rotation (pulleys orthagonal to each other instead of parallel) with a V belt? If so, what kind of distance is required for this.

    I don't want to have to purchase a 90 degree gear head, or have to run yet another motor. Too many motors.

  • #2
    You could put the motor with the shaft facing up with 2 pulleys of equal size. Have a ball bearing in one, the other solid to the shaft, oriented so the belt coming off the 2 work shafts is tangent to the motor pulleys.
    Kansas City area

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    • #3
      Google "Corvair Fan Belt". View Images. You'll get the idea. But keep a spare belt.
      Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
      ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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      • #4
        "You could put the motor with the shaft facing up with 2 pulleys of equal size. Have a ball bearing in one, the other solid to the shaft, oriented so the belt coming off the 2 work shafts is tangent to the motor pulleys."

        At first I thought you were pulling our legs, but it's really a neat idea.

        I had lots of fun in my two Corvairs, some of it while I was driving.
        winchman
        Senior Member
        Last edited by winchman; 04-08-2010, 10:43 PM.
        Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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        • #5
          It might work better to set the motor so each belt has a 45 degree twist.
          Don Young

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Toolguy
            You could put the motor with the shaft facing up with 2 pulleys of equal size. Have a ball bearing in one, the other solid to the shaft, oriented so the belt coming off the 2 work shafts is tangent to the motor pulleys.
            I would sure like a photo of that, I am having a hard time understanding how that works. Not saying it won't I just don't get it.

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            • #7
              Here ya go.


              The big drawback is that there's only ninety degrees of engagement on the drive pulley. The added side forces from the twist does a bit to make up for it, though.
              winchman
              Senior Member
              Last edited by winchman; 04-09-2010, 05:01 AM.
              Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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              • #8
                Another way to skin the cat...put the motor on a "lazy susan" post mount and have the wire wheels and disk sander axes intersect it. Spin the motor one way and hook it up with a quick coupler to drive one machine, and then do the same for the other machine when you want to run it. Downside is it takes a bit of fooling around to switch from machine to machine, and a lot of work to make the rotating stand for the motor. Another motor seems to be not only easier, but much more practical.
                Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by winchman
                  Here ya go.


                  The big drawback is that there's only ninety degrees of engagement on the drive pulley. The added side forces from the twist does a bit to make up for it, though.
                  I like that solution, Winchman.

                  4 Corvairs, 2 VW Beetles, 3 VW Busses. Finally got air-cooled, rear engine vehicles out of my system.
                  Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                  ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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                  • #10
                    I get it now, thanks a bunch.

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                    • #11
                      Instead of the setup proposed by toolguy and drawn by winchman I would direct drive one of the shafts with a pulley on it too and then turn the belt over a pair of idlers to the other shaft. You can also use a lightly crowned drum to turn the belt. For this purpose a poly v belt works best and will last as long as it will in a non twisted application. The pulleys are easy to make. This will give full drive power and minimum belt wear.
                      Evan
                      Senior Member
                      Last edited by Evan; 04-09-2010, 10:00 AM.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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