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OT:Nuts, Bolts & Thingamajigs

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  • OT:Nuts, Bolts & Thingamajigs

    This is an organization that was started to get kids interested in making things, using their hands, getting involved in manufacturing. It amazed me that it was started by an actor (John Ratzenberger from "Cheers"). I thought Hollywood didn't even know what manufacturing was, well at least one of them does. In the article in the ASME journal he said something that blew me away. "I found out that kids were graduating high school and couldn't read a ruler. One company asked applicants to mark 1 3/8 inches on a picture of a ruler. So many couldn't do it, they had to change it to a multiple choice question. They had to start a program to train employees to use such basic tools as channel locks, screwdrivers, and vise grip pliers". Man that's depressing. I hate to say it but this country is not on the way to the dumps, it past that turn off a while back.

    http://www.nutsandboltsfoundation.org/About-NBT.cfm

    Ed P

  • #2
    That's alright, we'll just graduate more lawyers and MBA's
    Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Ed P
      This is an organization that was started to get kids interested in making things, using their hands, getting involved in manufacturing. It amazed me that it was started by an actor (John Ratzenberger from "Cheers"). I thought Hollywood didn't even know what manufacturing was, well at least one of them does. In the article in the ASME journal he said something that blew me away. "I found out that kids were graduating high school and couldn't read a ruler. One company asked applicants to mark 1 3/8 inches on a picture of a ruler. So many couldn't do it, they had to change it to a multiple choice question. They had to start a program to train employees to use such basic tools as channel locks, screwdrivers, and vise grip pliers". Man that's depressing. I hate to say it but this country is not on the way to the dumps, it past that turn off a while back.

      http://www.nutsandboltsfoundation.org/About-NBT.cfm

      Ed P
      That may be true but you have to remember that many many young people today can.....name every pro foot ball player by name and position, all the rock band group's names and songs (I guess that is what they are called) , the latest and best video games and text at the speed of light. Not a big deal that they can't read a ruler or tie their own shoes.

      Comment


      • #4
        Would you be surprised if they couldn't make a knife from flint and run down a rabbit?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Tony Ennis
          Would you be surprised if they couldn't make a knife from flint and run down a rabbit?
          I would be surprised if they knew what flint was !

          Comment


          • #6
            Ed,

            We have a similar educational initative here in the UK. I am one of many Imagineering Tutors (voluntary, unpaid!) and we run after school clubs, introducing 11-12 year old children to the wonderful world of engineering and science. Their response and involvement is reward enough.

            For projects see here :-

            http://www.imagineeringweb.co.uk/web...projects.shtml

            The other organisation is STEMnet see :-

            http://www.stemnet.org.uk/home.cfm

            By default, I am also STEM Ambassador because I know a bit about science and maths.

            IanR

            Comment


            • #7
              Not being able to read a ruler is just the beginning. I know three recent "HS Grads" who cannot read a tape measure! Two of them used to work for a friend of mine. He thought teaching them would be a good idea. He figured he would start with 1/4 inch increments. He asked them how many quarters are in a dollar, the answer: Huh, Ummm, I dunno.....three?

              The third one is currently becoming a nurse. His father says he has stellar grades. Is about to graduate as a licensed nurse and join the work force.

              As a fellow engineer mentioned the other day, he has NO concept what a CC is. Without the ability to measure something, he has no concept of 1.0 cm x 1.0 cm x 1.0 cm. filled with water at a specific temperature being 1 CC.

              Looking forward, unless there is a drastic change, I think when the day comes to consider an old folks home, I will just take my chances at home...Or just crawl out in the woods and die peacefully. Either way the end result will be the same, but I fear they may accidently prolong the process in the old folks home!

              Comment


              • #8
                Life skills

                What is not being said here is how involved the parents are in the child's life...

                School and the workplace are poor substitutes for teaching your kids to be successful in life...an involved mother and father can do wonders for their kids.

                It is for reasons like this that I invite my son to help me on my '65 Mustang Fastback or I drag him to watch his grandfather work in his shop.

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                • #9
                  Kids become what their parents and society wants them to.

                  I learned this years ago as I watched industrial arts programs dismantled.

                  No one wanted to pay extra in taxes to keep them in place.

                  TMT

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ed P
                    This is an organization that was started to get kids interested in making things, using their hands, getting involved in manufacturing. It amazed me that it was started by an actor (John Ratzenberger from "Cheers"). I thought Hollywood didn't even know what manufacturing was, well at least one of them does. In the article in the ASME journal he said something that blew me away. "I found out that kids were graduating high school and couldn't read a ruler. One company asked applicants to mark 1 3/8 inches on a picture of a ruler. So many couldn't do it, they had to change it to a multiple choice question. They had to start a program to train employees to use such basic tools as channel locks, screwdrivers, and vise grip pliers". Man that's depressing. I hate to say it but this country is not on the way to the dumps, it past that turn off a while back.

                    http://www.nutsandboltsfoundation.org/About-NBT.cfm

                    Ed P
                    I wish the organization the best of luck.

                    TMT

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It's a crying shame the schools are phasing out "industrial arts" programs in favor of "music appreciation" and "modern dance" classes....

                      I guess we need more "Rappers" and "fairy dancers" in the world.

                      Of course, there's always the "exception" to the rule....

                      My Grand Niece, two years old. She has an amazing attraction to my brother's Logan Cabinet Lathe. She can sit and watch him work for hours, of course, asking a million questions while he works. Even at two, she has amazing manual dexterity. The kid peeled the shell off of a raw egg, without breaking it (she's handy to have around when you have hard boiled eggs, too)
                      She's also facinated with anything that moves...cars, bikes, airplanes.
                      It's sad that a kid like that won't have the opportunity to learn wood or metalworking in school....I guess Grandpa will have to teach her.
                      No good deed goes unpunished.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If possible teach her how to change the oil in her car and basic tune up procedures.

                        Also check oil levels and tire pressures when cold.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dvbydt
                          Ed,

                          We have a similar educational initative here in the UK. I am one of many Imagineering Tutors (voluntary, unpaid!) and we run after school clubs, introducing 11-12 year old children to the wonderful world of engineering and science. Their response and involvement is reward enough.

                          For projects see here :-

                          http://www.imagineeringweb.co.uk/web...projects.shtml

                          The other organisation is STEMnet see :-

                          http://www.stemnet.org.uk/home.cfm

                          By default, I am also STEM Ambassador because I know a bit about science and maths.

                          IanR

                          my hat is off to you. what a great thing you are doing for the youngsters.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            When I was teaching drafting and shop in the 60's,I always taught my students to read a ruler down to 1/32". I drilled it into them for a few weeks. I found out early on that many couldn't read below a whole inch.

                            A friend who worked in a ship yard told me about the guy who was in charge of cutting big pieces of steel plate. He would only cut to whole inches,because he couldn't read a ruler either. I guess the welders had to build up the extra needed steel when putting the part in place ?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Tony Ennis
                              Would you be surprised if they couldn't make a knife from flint and run down a rabbit?
                              -While we have no need to make knives from flint or to catch our own food these days, there will always be a need for people to design and build things.

                              Even if we get to the "Star Trek" stage where every home has a replicator, somebody still has to build the replicator.

                              No matter how advanced our civilization gets, people will need to make and use tools. The tools of the future may well include a hover-excavator that uses a disintegrator beam instead of a shovel, but you can damn well guarantee that a couple of guys with open-end wrenches, phillips screwdrivers and at least one two-pound sledge actually assembled it.

                              Doc.
                              Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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