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  • Wood joints

    I know some people here like to work with that brown stuff and I was pointed to this link on another form I go on.

    http://www.flexiblestream.org/Digita...Joints-001.php

    Basically it's a series of joins that can be cut using CNC machinery, some quite nice ones as well.



    .
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.




  • #2
    Actually John there are books full of different joints for woodworkers and many are very complicated. I'd love to see just one project done with some of them by hand! You would need a month of Sundays to get just one precision fit in some of the more complicated. CNC joints would not appeal to me for the same reason that dovetails cut with jigs don't, no evidence of hand and too perfect for my liking. I only use mortise & tenon and dovetails and all hand cut.
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

    It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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    • #3
      Don't tell me, with a flint axe ?
      .

      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by John Stevenson
        Don't tell me, with a flint axe ?
        He directs beavers.

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        • #5
          wood joints

          . . . . I have a book on Japanese woodworking and joints. Some are so complicated as to suspend belief. Wonderful art work though. They can put together an entire house without any nails. Something to think about
          Jerry Crawford
          I, also, have tools I don't know how to use

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          • #6
            By hand? Sure - this one is a hand cut joint from Martin about 130 years ago - it's about as tricky as any I work on in my business:



            Here's a traditional Japanese joint:



            And, a video:

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwAnpqjEo1A

            Power tools, jigs and fixtures, CNC - they're all fine, but there's a special feeling you can get by working strictly with hand tools.

            I particularly like hand carving these ivory bridges:



            Here's the whole process:

            http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Luth...orybridge.html
            Cheers,

            Frank Ford
            HomeShopTech

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            • #7
              The nail gun made all these wood joints obsolete...

              If one nail won't do, you slam another ten in.. Which is the ideology of every modern carpenter I have seen...
              Precision takes time.

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              • #8
                OZ joints and skills

                'ere y'are Ringer.


                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunny

                The original timber joint with maximum economy as regards nails, material and time but tops as regards functionality.

                Many a bloke has spent many an hour in there with his hammer in his hand with much sweat and feverish activity - and not a nail driven - but he emerged with a satisfied look on his face tho' - but his head looked like it was being pulled down between his shoulders.

                Wives were either pi$$ed off because he spent so much time there - or didn't.

                A classic of OZ carpentry skills and joints. Two and three holers were in use in the "Out-back" (both "dunny" and wide open spaces).

                But we are a very refined lot here and certainly not uncouth at all - hence the vanity curtain.

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                • #9
                  me thinks thats an over-share................................

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ringer
                    The nail gun made all these wood joints obsolete...
                    .
                    ah yes, those skilled craftsmen who think drywall screws and sandpaper made joinery and wood scrapers obsolete
                    Last edited by Mcgyver; 04-11-2010, 10:39 AM.
                    .

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by fortcollinsjerry
                      . . . . I have a book on Japanese woodworking and joints. (Snip snip.) They can put together an entire house without any nails. Something to think about
                      We have builders like that here too :-)

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by fortcollinsjerry
                        . They can put together an entire house without any nails. Something to think about
                        Hell, they were doing that in Florida for the past 50 years. That's why many of the roofs blew off during hurricanes. I think building codes call for nails now


                        Originally posted by John Stevenson
                        Don't tell me, with a flint axe ?
                        Only if its been dulled down a bit skinning buffalo, elk and limeys ! There needs to be some challenge left to make it worth the effort.
                        Last edited by Your Old Dog; 04-11-2010, 08:22 AM.
                        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                        Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                        It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Limeys are the worst, they don't half have thick skins........
                          .

                          Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                          • #14
                            I sold my biscuit joiner and have gone back happily to using dowels much better.Alistair
                            Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by oldtiffie
                              'ere y'are Ringer.


                              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunny

                              The original timber joint with maximum economy as regards nails, material and time but tops as regards functionality.

                              Many a bloke has spent many an hour in there with his hammer in his hand with much sweat and feverish activity - and not a nail driven - but he emerged with a satisfied look on his face tho' - but his head looked like it was being pulled down between his shoulders.

                              Wives were either pi$$ed off because he spent so much time there - or didn't.

                              A classic of OZ carpentry skills and joints. Two and three holers were in use in the "Out-back" (both "dunny" and wide open spaces).

                              But we are a very refined lot here and certainly not uncouth at all - hence the vanity curtain.
                              hi ya Tiffie, the title for your post was 'OZ joints and skills for pragmatic wankers'?? did you get that shaper yet?
                              Ken.

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