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  • Buffing wheels

    Last year I bought a HF 6" buffer. The wheels it came with seem to have much in common with pixie dust as bits of them fly everywhere. No amount of waxing those wheels prevents the snowstorm that a buffing session generates. So who makes good wheels and how does one prep them to last?

    My desire is to use one wheel with rouge and the other wheel to work off sanding/filing marks, excluding serious gouges that no amount of buffing is going to correct.

  • #2
    Even with name brand wheels I am covered in white after a buffing session.

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    • #3
      Would'nt that be how the wheel sheds used up compound and dirt/polishing debrie?
      Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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      • #4
        McMaster-Carr sells a good selection of buffing wheels and similar products.Spiral sewn cotton is good for general purpose buffing and spiral sewn sissal works good for rough work.

        http://www.mcmaster.com/#buffing-wheels/=6mh4n7

        The larger diameter buff you can use and the lower speed you can use them at means the maximum life span of the wheel and less heat generated in the work.

        It's still dirty work,they also sell Tyvek suits and face sheilds
        I just need one more tool,just one!

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        • #5
          Try Caswell ( http://www.caswellplating.com/buffs/index.html ).
          They have some on-line manuals and great tech help. I use them for all of my buffing and plating supplies.
          "Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not."~ Thomas Jefferson

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          • #6
            www.brownells.com has good buffiing supplies, and their "Gunsmith Kinks #1" book has good information about buffing.
            ----------
            Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
            Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
            Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
            There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
            Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
            Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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            • #7
              If you want a mirror finish, then cotton and rouge. My vote goes for Scotch-Brite deburring wheels grade 7SFN, 6" dia x 1" wide. No mess and a finish about the same as 600 grit. They cost more but last me about 2-3 years and did I mention no fluff.

              IanR

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              • #8
                Four coarse work I like to make my own wheels by gluing up dense paper or cardboard too the desired thickness then drilling an arbor hole and turning to the right diameter. They take a charge of polishing compound well and are a good stiffness for getting rid of grinding marks. The paper from hanging file folders works well. Plain old elmer's works fine to glue them up.
                Since they're free I made several thicknesses and profiles.

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                • #9
                  Not all buffing wheels shed to much fluff.
                  I have a selection of old wheels that I've picked up at fleamarkets and auctions, and only one or two out of about 12 or 15 does much sheding.

                  I don't know about a modern brand that good though.

                  I rake the wheel to clear out the old compound whenever I use them, then just keep adding compound.

                  I would rather rake now and then, than get covered with fluff whenever I use them.
                  If it aint broke, your not tryin'. -Red Green

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                  • #10
                    I'm just now getting in to the buffing realm. What kind of wheal do I start with for removing casting marks in aluminum. I want to take factory engine parts and polish them up.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dvbydt
                      If you want a mirror finish, then cotton and rouge. My vote goes for Scotch-Brite deburring wheels grade 7SFN, 6" dia x 1" wide. No mess and a finish about the same as 600 grit. They cost more but last me about 2-3 years and did I mention no fluff.

                      IanR
                      Where do you buy the Scotchbrite wheels?
                      Under construction - MGB roadster widened 11.5" with Corvette C-4 suspension front and rear, 440 hp LT1 V8 with a T-56 6 speed.

                      Lots of pictures here
                      Part 1 http://forum.britishv8.org/read.php?13,7581
                      Part 2 http://forum.britishv8.org/read.php?13,22422

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jim Stabe
                        Where do you buy the Scotchbrite wheels?

                        In the UK - MSC/J&L. Would you like a photo of the finish?

                        IanR

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                        • #13
                          The wheels I have are woven similar to this image: http://www.nebraskahistory.org/image...arps-wefts.jpg

                          That causes whole threads to sling loose which is what Macona described. This is what made me wonder if there are wheels with a better weave or possible a knit that will stay together.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by dvbydt
                            In the UK - MSC/J&L. Would you like a photo of the finish?

                            IanR
                            If it's not too much trouble
                            Under construction - MGB roadster widened 11.5" with Corvette C-4 suspension front and rear, 440 hp LT1 V8 with a T-56 6 speed.

                            Lots of pictures here
                            Part 1 http://forum.britishv8.org/read.php?13,7581
                            Part 2 http://forum.britishv8.org/read.php?13,22422

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dp
                              The wheels I have are woven similar to this image: http://www.nebraskahistory.org/image...arps-wefts.jpg

                              That causes whole threads to sling loose which is what Macona described. This is what made me wonder if there are wheels with a better weave or possible a knit that will stay together.
                              Are the wheels you have spiral sewn like this one?

                              http://img.tradeindia.com/fp/1/416/430.jpg
                              I just need one more tool,just one!

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