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  • New Product Idea?

    Hi Everyone,

    This is Joey again and hopefully this time I would not create such a stir like last time. I recently received a suggestion from a potential customer about bringing in a 4" or 5" 6 jaw lathe chuck, cast iron chuck body, plain back, accuracy to .0005". I want to take this chance to ask how you guys think and determine if there is a market demand on this. i am not trying to spam this time, just want to know your guys' opinion.

  • #2
    That accuracy is difficult to achieve. The best you can do is an adjust-tru type of chuck that can be centered, if necessary, for each diameter of workpiece. I do think there would be a market for an adjust-tru type of chuck.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Bruce,

      thank you for your comment. The chuck I am thinking about is an adjust-thru chuck.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Bruce Griffing
        That accuracy is difficult to achieve. The best you can do is an adjust-tru type of chuck that can be centered, if necessary, for each diameter of workpiece. I do think there would be a market for an adjust-tru type of chuck.
        I don't know about a 6-jaw chuck's accuracy right of the box, but I've got a Pratt Burnerd 10" Super Precision 3-jaw chuck (in D1-6 mount) that runs out less than .0003" on every diameter I've ever put in it.

        It was new old stock from a dealer doing away with their manual machine lines, and had actually been dropped on one jaw hard enough to crack it through at one of the bolt counterbores. Still runs as close to perfect as I could wish for, and I got it for the princely sum of $250.

        Comment


        • #5
          PixMan-
          I think a scroll chuck that holds that accuracy over a range of diameters is a pretty rare item.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Bruce Griffing
            PixMan-
            I think a scroll chuck that holds that accuracy over a range of diameters is a pretty rare item.
            Indeed it is, and that's why it's never going anywhere out of sight.

            Comment


            • #7
              I thiink you'd probably sell a good number of them... depending on price, of course.

              Offering fitted backs would sell more.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by SharsTool
                cast iron chuck body, plain back, accuracy to .0005". I want to take this chance to ask how you guys think and determine if there is a market demand on this.
                Why cast iron instead of steel? Cheaper?

                Accuracy to 0.0005" is ambitious. Even well known chuck manufacturers will only claim repeatability of 5 tenths with adjustment required at every diameter, and I never see accuracy claims. If it turns out to be anything like the 6" 3-jaw that I bought from you a few years ago, it'll have a sticky scroll and questionable repeatability.

                What's the ballpark price you're thinking about including the backplate? If it's worth a damn, it'll probably be too expensive for the types of lathes that use 4 or 5 inch chucks. My 2 cents.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by RobbieKnobbie
                  Offering fitted backs would sell more.
                  Hi RobbieKnobbie,

                  thanks for the comment. what type of back plate mounting would you recommend that I should start with?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by NBbrad
                    Why cast iron instead of steel? Cheaper?

                    Accuracy to 0.0005" is ambitious. Even well known chuck manufacturers will only claim repeatability of 5 tenths with adjustment required at every diameter, and I never see accuracy claims. If it turns out to be anything like the 6" 3-jaw that I bought from you a few years ago, it'll have a sticky scroll and questionable repeatability.

                    What's the ballpark price you're thinking about including the backplate? If it's worth a damn, it'll probably be too expensive for the types of lathes that use 4 or 5 inch chucks. My 2 cents.
                    Hi NBbrad,

                    cast iron body has lower cost than steel body. Bison is a good example to compare the price between a cast iron body and steel body.

                    5 tenth runout is achieved by 4 micro adjustment screws on the back of the chuck.

                    i do not have a price yet as i am still on the research process, but I am a competitive person in nature. can you tell to me on what type of application or scenario would one wants to use a 6 jaw chuck? And what type of lathe would you think one would outfitted with a 5" 6 jaw scroll chuck?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ok heres a problem for ya shares

                      While a 3 jaw you can 'adjust true' and it does not matter how good the scroll is because with 3 jaws, all 3 jaws allways touch and clamp down simutaniously.

                      With a 6 jaw, if the scroll is not perfict, the jaws will not clamp accurately and at the same 'time'
                      As in, only 3+ jaws will clamp down, and the other 3~ won't.

                      Do not assume 'set true' screws compensates for a poor scroll with a 6 jaw, unless you plan to make each of the 6 jaws independantly tightened (ie no scroll)

                      As for uses of a 6 jaw:
                      6 jaws are best for delicate work, like thin walled pipe, as it can grip it better without deforming it due to extra support.
                      Poorly designed 6 jaw scroll could result in dangerious work comming loose during turning operations if not all the jaws are supporting the work equaly.

                      I might be kinda intrested in a independant jaw 6 jaw with set true screws however, for when I get around to making a wood lathe, as it could hold irregular work easily and be dialed in easily.
                      Last edited by Black_Moons; 04-18-2010, 01:32 AM.
                      Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I've been wondering about the clamping force on 6-jaw chucks, too. I can see an advantage for tubular work but 6 jaws in a scroll chuck is a 3-jaw in disguise. The trick is to know which three are doing the work.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SharsTool
                          Hi NBbrad,

                          cast iron body has lower cost than steel body. Bison is a good example to compare the price between a cast iron body and steel body.

                          5 tenth runout is achieved by 4 micro adjustment screws on the back of the chuck.

                          i do not have a price yet as i am still on the research process, but I am a competitive person in nature. can you tell to me on what type of application or scenario would one wants to use a 6 jaw chuck? And what type of lathe would you think one would outfitted with a 5" 6 jaw scroll chuck?
                          4 micro adjust screws on a 6 jaw??? What am I missing here?
                          I have tools I don't even know I own...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hi Torker,

                            the 4 micro adjustment screw is located on the back of the chuck in a bolt circle pattern with 90 degree apart of each other. Adjusting the 4 screw will bring the center of the chuck closer to the center of the lathe spindle, thus achieving reduced runout.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Black_Moons

                              With a 6 jaw, if the scroll is not perfict, the jaws will not clamp accurately and at the same 'time'
                              As in, only 3+ jaws will clamp down, and the other 3~ won't.

                              Do not assume 'set true' screws compensates for a poor scroll with a 6 jaw, unless you plan to make each of the 6 jaws independantly tightened (ie no scroll)
                              Hi Black_Moons,

                              thanks for your tip and I will keep that piece of information in mind.

                              Originally posted by Black_Moons
                              As for uses of a 6 jaw:
                              6 jaws are best for delicate work, like thin walled pipe, as it can grip it better without deforming it due to extra support.
                              Poorly designed 6 jaw scroll could result in dangerious work comming loose during turning operations if not all the jaws are supporting the work equaly.
                              thank you for sharing the application advantage of a 6 jaw chuck with me. and can you tell me why would one person pick the 5" chuck over a 6" chuck? Is there some kind of reason that one must use a 4" or 5" chuck?

                              Comment

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