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Wood handle manufacture

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  • Wood handle manufacture

    Greetings all,

    Say you wanted to make a shape like a hammer handle, be it axe, hammer or what have you, but not full size, like model hammers. I know about the Blanchard lathe, but has anyone made a small version of this? Besides a 4th axis cnc how would you do it?

  • #2
    Handle

    I would use a small Draw Knife.

    JRW

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    • #3
      Check out " Roy Underhill " on PBS. :-)
      ...lew...

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      • #4
        There's one type of "lathe" that does that sort of work.

        It has two (or more) spindles, one holding a pattern to be copied. Some sort of tracer mechanism follows over the slowly rotating pattern. A high speed rotating cutterhead travels down the part length cutting the rotating blank (s) to the shape of the pattern.

        One shop I've done work for made guitar necks on this type of machine. (They've since converted to CNC vertical milling machines to make necks because it's faster.)

        This type lathe could be made using a standard lathe hydraulic tracer assembly provided you could rig up a way to have the pattern rotate in synchronization with the main spindle.

        An old Bridgeport hydraulic tracer mill could to it also. Again, you'd have to rig up a rotating pattern and workpiece, but this might be a whole lot easier than the tracer on a lathe.


        What's a Blanchard lathe?

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        • #5
          Band saw pretty much to shape, then maybe rasp and file, maybe go straight to belt sander. 2x72 belt, not the 4x36 kind people seem to think of for wood.

          Steve

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          • #6
            If you are looking at making oval turnings, it depends how specific the shapes needs to be. For something like the handle of an axe or sledge, mark the ends of the turning with 2 centres, you will need to experiment to find what works best for the shape you are trying to create. Then mount the blank on one set of centres and start turning till you get close to the shape you are looking for on one side. Now re-mount it on the other set of centres and try to match the second side to the first. You will need to run the lathe at a fairly low speed, because it will be a long way from balanced.
            I haven't tried to turn a handle like this, just cabriole chair legs and it isn't something to try for relaxation.

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            • #7
              I've worked on handle making machinery,both new and old.

              Some of the old lathes had back knives,basically a knife ground to the handle's profile and set at a 45* angle to the lathes axis.In use the knife would make contact with the spining handle and the profile would be generated as the knife was moved vertically through the cut.This type lathe is used for round handles,hoe,shovel and rake handles.

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DrusdpCcd1Y

              Then there are pattern eccentric lathes where the handle blank is rotated slowly while a rotary pattern knife is fed in against the blank.The rotary knife's movement is controlled by a cam that generates the oval cross section on the handle.

              Then finally there are the newer abrasive types,where the pattern knives are replaced by basically a coarse grinding stone profiled to the desired shape.The blank is held between centers and rotated against the stone as a cam bobs the blank in and out froming the oval cossection.
              I just need one more tool,just one!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by sandiapaul
                Greetings all,

                Say you wanted to make a shape like a hammer handle, be it axe, hammer or what have you, but not full size, like model hammers. I know about the Blanchard lathe, but has anyone made a small version of this? Besides a 4th axis cnc how would you do it?
                Yes. I built a baby version of a Blanchard lathe for making the oval, tapered, curved wooden wheel spokes for the teens and twenties vintage car wheels. Works well. Some photos in post 12 and some details in post 7 in this thread:

                http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...enious-114002/

                Right now I never want to see another wooden wheel!

                franco
                Last edited by franco; 05-04-2010, 12:16 PM.

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