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clamping things flat in a vise

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  • #46
    The hold downs do not need any particular preparation to clamp items in the machine vise.

    Simply place the two hold downs and the part to be held on the bed of the vise in the proper position;



    Tighten the vise in the normal manner, pushing the hold downs into position. They will grip the workpiece and force it flat to the bed of the vise;



    It really cannot be made any simpler.
    Jim H.

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    • #47
      Thank you, Jim.

      The setup will tolerate only a relatively light milling, right?
      Mike
      WI/IL border, USA

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      • #48
        The company that makes the Mitee-bite clamps make a dimensionally accurate paper with glue on both sides, like hot glue stick type glue, that would work well for this. Clamp a plate, big enough to hold the total work piece, to the mill table, machine flat and then place the paper between the work and the plate. Heat it up with an household iron or similar heating appliance and then place a weight big enough to cover the whole piece on top of it. When it cools it is ready to machine. Use lighter cuts to prevent the tool from tearing the work off of the plate.
        The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

        Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

        Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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        • #49
          Originally posted by MichaelP
          Thank you, Jim.

          The setup will tolerate only a relatively light milling, right?
          The piece is clamped as tight as the vise will draw it. It will tolerate normal milling cuts. The only caveat is that the edges being clamped should be true and parallel within reasonable limits.
          Jim H.

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          • #50
            Hold-downs

            Good info and god pics/illustration Jim.

            For the OP and others:
            Those (or similar) hold-downs will sure solve a lot of the "moving jaw up-lift" problems.

            They may not convert a junk or poor or "lesser" vise into a "Kurt" - but in many cases it will - or very close to it - but without the cost of or having to find space for a "better" vice.

            Jim H made an excellent point about the need for the job (and by implication, the vise jaws) need to be pretty good as regards being parallel or else the job and the hold-downs may only grip at one point and that is a real potential problem.

            This is my old so-called "good" "Record" vise (bought new 40 years ago) - that I posted earlier - that I bought because of it self-aligning (pivoting/rotating) moving jaw for my drill press (aka pedestal drill):


            The self-aligning jaw ensures that I have a good grip no matter how out of parallel or rough or irregular the faces of the job are.

            Most times I don't bother about the up-lift - but if I do I use a bronze "dolly" as a "dead-blow hammer" as the "dolly" does not "bounce" and doesn't mark the job either. It is a bit of 1 1/2" phosphor-bronze (for bearings) bar that I've had for about 55 years. I have several smaller ones. They get a lot of use on the mill as well as the drill - and the grinders too!!.

            If I really do want the job "hard up and hard down" I will use my "ruler hold-down/s".

            Hold-downs are really "tops" and work on the drill, the mill and the grinders (T&C and surface) too.

            But beware - they are not to be abused, over-loaded or taken for granted.

            They can - and do - mark the job if you are not careful - so protect surfaces as required.

            If hold-downs are treated with the care and respect they deserve they are an excellent tool - but be careless and they can bite you in the ar$e - as can just about any machine or tool if you get too careless or too optimistic.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by MichaelP
              Can anybody post some pictures on how the Starrett hold-downs are used? I cannot visualize it.
              At the moment it is 35% off on orders over $199,00.

              So I'm trying to quickly determine weather I should get a screwless or a Kurt to go with the rotary table and other stuff I'm ordering for my mini mill/drill.

              Darren Harris
              Staten Island, New York.

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              • #52
                It's "UP TO 35%". And it's taken off the inflated LIST price. Put some items in your cart and see what you get... often not even 20%. In my area they then add in sales tax and freight. Not such a great deal.

                Enco has a price guarrantee. Get MSC's best price (from your cart), then have Enco meet it and use a free freight code. Oh, MSC owns Enco

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by lakeside53
                  It's "UP TO 35%". And it's taken off the inflated LIST price. Put some items in your cart and see what you get... often not even 20%.
                  The Mitee-Grip is discounted 30% to $34.56. Far cheaper than you can buy it anywhere else:

                  "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                  • #54
                    OK, that's one

                    Most stuff I wanted last week (same deal) wasn't worth the effort, but I still check

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                    • #55
                      It always ticks me off when product is purchased and then when I go to use use it again much later it is ruined because of shelf life. Emailed Mitee-Bite with a few questions on this work holding product, good news.

                      What is the shelf life of this product ?
                      There is no shelf life for this product providing it is stored as described below.

                      What is the best way to store it?

                      A. Keep product in original shipping tube with cover on
                      B. Store tube in clean & dry environment at room temperature.

                      Is there a way to know the date of manufacture?

                      Yes, each tube has a lot number that is associated with a date of manufacture. We write the lot number on your "pick-ticket" for our records.

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                      • #56
                        MSC free shipping MRFF410 stacks with the up tp 35% SELECT35W code.

                        Just used both so it works at least today.

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by JCHannum
                          The piece is clamped as tight as the vise will draw it. It will tolerate normal milling cuts. The only caveat is that the edges being clamped should be true and parallel within reasonable limits.
                          To total contact area is very small and located very low, so I assumed the workpiece won't be as stable as if it was held by the regular jaws.
                          Mike
                          WI/IL border, USA

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Blanchard grind the .250 thickness to clean, both sides.
                            Piece should now be parallel within .001.
                            Set up at least 3 precision toolmaker vises (Hermann Schmidt)
                            Grind the 1 1/2 width to clean, both sides, and perpendicular to .250 thickness.
                            Set up Schmidt vises with proper height parallel bars.
                            Locate part on parallel bars, bow side up, do not tap part down to bars.
                            Part needs to be in a relaxed state if you want to make it flat.
                            Grind the part to clean to remove bow.
                            Part should now be reasonably flat.
                            Flip part over and tap to parallel bars. Grind to clean and make parallel.
                            Inspect for flatness. If part is not to desired tolerance repeat process.
                            Part will improve with each pass.

                            You could also try milling using the same technique but I would suggest 2 Kurt vises.
                            Best of luck

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by DGC View Post
                              Blanchard grind the .250 thickness to clean, both sides.
                              Piece should now be parallel within .001.
                              Set up at least 3 precision toolmaker vises (Hermann Schmidt)
                              Grind the 1 1/2 width to clean, both sides, and perpendicular to .250 thickness.
                              Set up Schmidt vises with proper height parallel bars.
                              Locate part on parallel bars, bow side up, do not tap part down to bars.
                              Part needs to be in a relaxed state if you want to make it flat.
                              Grind the part to clean to remove bow.
                              Part should now be reasonably flat.
                              Flip part over and tap to parallel bars. Grind to clean and make parallel.
                              Inspect for flatness. If part is not to desired tolerance repeat process.
                              Part will improve with each pass.

                              You could also try milling using the same technique but I would suggest 2 Kurt vises.
                              Best of luck


                              of course, the blanchard grinder! I always forget to use that and end up fussing about with the mini mill.
                              .

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                                of course, the blanchard grinder! I always forget to use that and end up fussing about with the mini mill.
                                Hey Mcgyver, I got 2 words for you, zombie thread.
                                Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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