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  • I want to build small milling vise, as seen...

    I like this style of vice in this video:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/tryally#p/u/3/RixYKIZqJnY
    Anyone here have any other designs? I've watched all his videos and it seems easy to make, just wondering if there are any others out there that have them.

  • #2
    Neat little low profile vise. Looks pretty simple. The C shaped frame that makes up the body of the vise and the fixed jaw is just bolted down to one T-slot. The movable jaw is snugged down with the two bolts in the other T-slot to keep it from lifting and then tightened from the right side with that triangular shaped piece. Then the two bolts on the movable jaw are tightened the rest of the way. That should be pretty easy to make.
    Stuart de Haro

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    • #3
      Do you think aluminum will suffice? I am making one for my sherline lathe, with a milling column (part 3050) attachment. I'm not making big parts by any means, mainly stuff for small model cars.

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      • #4
        More here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsLhXwt8pX0

        .

        Last edited by Thomas Staubo; 05-10-2010, 07:59 PM.
        Thomas

        Problems worthy of attack prove their worth by hitting back
        - Piet Hein

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        • #5
          Aluminum will likey suffice yes, but steel is much more rigid.. but is more likey to marr parts.

          Aluminum jaws on a steel body are typicaly great.

          (Note all steels are nearly the same rigidity, so just use whatever steel you like to machine/can easily get/etc)
          Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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          • #6
            So here's a design based on the youtube version. I have other pics with all the dimensions, this just shows the table, and all the parts of the vice.

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            • #7
              That is a great little vice, he was thinking out of the box on it.

              I would think careful milling of steps in the bottom to match the T-slots would be a nice addition to save a couple squaring setups. Also like the idea of steel, though aluminum would work out very well and if you wear it out, just make another.

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              • #8
                It seems to be the basic "table-as-part-of-vise" vise...... With steps milled in to hold parts.

                The back side may or may not be that useful, as it is not clamped against in the way he is using it.

                You could use the typical shaper hold-downs for even thinner total height.

                You can make the vise with less material, and add separate jaws so ANY type or shape can be held well.

                I made one a while back , which was shown in an HSM article. It has the same elements, but has replaceable jaws, which can have any sort of steps in them. I used steel, you wouldn't have to.

                particular shape and double screw are due to single slot...... but it has worked out well.

                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

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                • #9
                  The small Sherline vice is nice. The website that goes with it is interesting.
                  JT. That's a nice little vice. Which issue was the write up in? I have a PM horizontal making its way to me and its viceless. :-)
                  Thanks
                  Dave

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ken_Shea
                    That is a great little vice, he was thinking out of the box on it.

                    I would think careful milling of steps in the bottom to match the T-slots would be a nice addition to save a couple squaring setups. Also like the idea of steel, though aluminum would work out very well and if you wear it out, just make another.
                    How would it be tightened to the bed if the slots were part of the vise?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by J Tiers
                      The back side may or may not be that useful, as it is not clamped against in the way he is using it.

                      You can make the vise with less material, and add separate jaws so ANY type or shape can be held well.
                      Hmmm...good idea. I could make the edges of the plates flat, and have interchangeable jaws with varying heights...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sportandmiah
                        How would it be tightened to the bed if the slots were part of the vise?
                        I believe the idea expressed is to have the vise parts with keys for the table slot(s) so the vise would begin aligned. Saves an alignment step at least for basic alignment where a quarter degree or so is not a problem.

                        I put milled-in-place keys in mine. Watch out for the inside corners though, if you use a milled-in-place key.

                        The issue was probably late 2007 or in 2008, IIRC
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

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                        • #13
                          The two piece vise like JTiers shows is a handy tool for holding parts larger than the normal vise will accomodate.

                          I would suggest, if making one, to make the moveable jaw a bit taller and angling the clamp bolts downward at a couple of degrees, maybe 5 or so, to prevent the jaw from rising and providing a downward pressure on the workpiece.
                          Jim H.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JCHannum
                            I would suggest, if making one, to make the moveable jaw a bit taller and angling the clamp bolts downward at a couple of degrees, maybe 5 or so, to prevent the jaw from rising and providing a downward pressure on the workpiece.
                            You do that semi-automatically....... leave the moving jaw hold-down slightly loose, and when you have tightened the pusher screws, pull it down with the hold-down screws.....after also tapping with lead hammer. gets slightly tighter, and is also pulled down.

                            You need some clearance on the screws, and also to do what you suggest, the t-nut sort-of needs to be in a fixed position, which is not so easy. Otherwise the wrong item may slide.
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

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