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  • ot The Bathtub Test

    During a visit to the old folks home, I asked the matron how do
    you determine whether or not a patient should be institutionalized?


    "Well," said the matron, "we fill up a bathtub, then we offer a teaspoon, a teacup, and a bucket to the patient and ask him or her to empty the bathtub."


    "Oh, I understand," I said. "A normal person would use the bucket because it's bigger than the spoon or the teacup."


    "No." said the matron, "A normal person would pull the plug.-



    - Do you want a bed near the window?"
    John

    I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

  • #2
    I would say, "Oh goodie", and jump in the tub to splash all the water out.

    I'd like a bed near the pool.

    Mark

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    • #3
      I've spent a little time in these homes in the last couple of years visiting my dad who has had a couple visits.

      It doesn't seem as foreign to me as it did when I was in my 20's.

      Don't look like a lot of fun to me though.

      No pool either.

      Brian
      OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

      THINK HARDER

      BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

      MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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      • #4
        No way will I end up in an "old folks home" just waiting to die. As far as I am concerned that is a fate worse than death.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Evan
          No way will I end up in an "old folks home" just waiting to die. As far as I am concerned that is a fate worse than death.
          I was in harbor freight today to pick up a cigarette lighter outlet splitter. I watched an old gent wander around the store picking up things, mumbling to himself. For a few enjoyable minutes, he reminded me quite a bit of my grandfather...or at least the person that used to be my grandfather. Now my grandfather is sitting in a chair, where he sits until it's time to eat or go to the bathroom or go to bed. All three can in actuality be done in the chair just the same.

          I work in a veterinary hospital that offers critical care nursing, and more advanced medical care than the average hospital. We recently had a patient that was lateral for over a week and a half in the hospital, the owner doesn't believe in euthanasia. The patient went home, still lateral, refusing to eat or drink. Poor dog doesn't even move to use the facilities anymore.

          It's amazing how the latter patient would be euthanized by any one of us that work at the hospital, but for my grandfather, it's a perfectly acceptable life. Sorry, for those people that are still holding on to the shell of a man that used to be my grandfather...it's a perfectly acceptable life. The sparkle in the eye of that man has long been gone, this was glaringly apparent to my wife and I when even her presence didn't get him going.

          I don't wish to go early, but I sure as hell don't want to go late.

          Comment


          • #6
            snowman...

            I understand where you are coming from...

            It is H... when the body goes and the mind is as sound as a 20 year old... then what do you do.........

            My solution...

            buy a motorcycle and a blindfold.... ride and have fun... when you can't remember how to get home put on the blindfold and practice zen driving....

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by huntinguy
              snowman...

              My solution...

              buy a motorcycle and a blindfold.... ride and have fun... when you can't remember how to get home put on the blindfold and practice zen driving....
              Agreed, BUT what about the pople you hit & who clean up after you.
              John

              I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

              Comment


              • #8
                Just wander out on a -40 night and study the stars for a while.
                Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                • #9
                  I suspect recreational drugs will make a big comeback as those of us my age reach our dotage. If I get to the point where all I can do is sit around in a diaper, I want to be happy about it.

                  Looking forward to disgusting my kids,
                  BillB

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Dementia

                    Laugh about dementia and those that have it but spare a thought for their carer/s as well as their kith and kin as they can see it and realise what the prospects are for those with dementia.

                    Those at, approaching or over 65 years of age have quite a good (??)chance of getting it:

                    Read these items from:
                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alzheimer%27s_disease

                    Prognosis

                    Disability-adjusted life year for Alzheimer and other dementias per 100,000 inhabitants in 2002.
                    no data

                    ≤ 50

                    50-70

                    70-90

                    90-110

                    110-130

                    130-150

                    150-170

                    170-190

                    190-210

                    210-230

                    230-250

                    ≥ 250The early stages of Alzheimer's disease are difficult to diagnose. A definitive diagnosis is usually made once cognitive impairment compromises daily living activities, although the person may still be living independently. The symptoms will progress from mild cognitive problems, such as memory loss through increasing stages of cognitive and non-cognitive disturbances, eliminating any possibility of independent living.[25]

                    Life expectancy of the population with the disease is reduced.[9][168][169] The mean life expectancy following diagnosis is approximately seven years.[9] Fewer than 3% of patients live more than fourteen years.[10] Disease features significantly associated with reduced survival are an increased severity of cognitive impairment, decreased functional level, history of falls, and disturbances in the neurological examination. Other coincident diseases such as heart problems, diabetes or history of alcohol abuse are also related with shortened survival.[168][170][171] While the earlier the age at onset the higher the total survival years, life expectancy is particularly reduced when compared to the healthy population among those who are younger.[169] Men have a less favourable survival prognosis than women.[10][172]

                    The disease is the underlying cause of death in 70% of all cases.[9] Pneumonia and dehydration are the most frequent immediate causes of death, while cancer is a less frequent cause of death than in the general population.[9][172]
                    Caregiving
                    Further information: Caregiving and dementia
                    Since Alzheimer's has no cure and it gradually renders people incapable of tending for their own needs, caregiving essentially is the treatment and must be carefully managed over the course of the disease.

                    During the early and moderate stages, modifications to the living environment and lifestyle can increase patient safety and reduce caretaker burden.[157][158] Examples of such modifications are the adherence to simplified routines, the placing of safety locks, the labelling of household items to cue the person with the disease or the use of modified daily life objects.[146][159][160] The patient may also become incapable of feeding themselves, so they require food in smaller pieces or pureed.[161] When swallowing difficulties arise, the use of feeding tubes may be required. In such cases, the medical efficacy and ethics of continuing feeding is an important consideration of the caregivers and family members.[162][163] The use of physical restraints is rarely indicated in any stage of the disease, although there are situations when they are necessary to prevent harm to the person with AD or their caregivers.[146]

                    As the disease progresses, different medical issues can appear, such as oral and dental disease, pressure ulcers, malnutrition, hygiene problems, or respiratory, skin, or eye infections. Careful management can prevent them, while professional treatment is needed when they do arise.[164][165] During the final stages of the disease, treatment is centred on relieving discomfort until death.[166]

                    A small recent study in the US concluded that patients whose caregivers had a realistic understanding of the prognosis and clinical complications of late dementia were less likely to receive aggressive treatment near the end of life. [167]

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BillB
                      I suspect recreational drugs will make a big comeback as those of us my age reach our dotage. If I get to the point where all I can do is sit around in a diaper, I want to be happy about it.
                      I read a news article that this is already taking place.

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