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Chinese "Brass" Fittings

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  • Chinese "Brass" Fittings

    My garden hose was leaking at the end which attaches to the wall water faucet. After 12 years of use, I guess it is allowed to leak. I went to local home suppy store and bought a replacement female hose fitting and clamp. (The old leaking fitting is cut off and the cut hose end is slipped onto the barbed end and clamped in place.)

    Since the new fitting was in two section, I figures I'd solder them together to make one solid piece with one less joint for potential leaks. I polished up the "brass" pieces, fluxed then and heated them. The lead solder just beaded up and rolled off the fittings and would not flow into the joint I wished to mate. I check with a magnet and they were not steel. Thinking that the fitting was dirty, I polished it again with a wire brush and the "brass" begain to turn to a silver color. The more I brushed, the more silver the part became. The "brass" fitting was really made from aluminum!

    I wonder how many other "brass" fitting made in China are really made from aluminum?
    Bill

    Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

    Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

  • #2
    That helps them beat the magnet test.

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    • #3
      You do know theres a good reason they are 2 parts?
      One part is the threaded clamp part.. And the other is the hose->washer interface.
      If you solder em togethor, you gotta rotate the whole hose to tighten it.. against the washer.

      The threads of a garden hose thread are not designed to seal at ALL, they are just a course 'Can't screw this up!' consumer thread.

      http://www.midwestsupplies.com/media...h-3-8-barb.jpg
      Assumeing you mean one of those.
      Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Black_Moons
        If you solder em togethor, you gotta rotate the whole hose to tighten it.. against the washer.
        Or hold the hose still and rotate the faucet .

        Steve

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        • #5
          The replacement ends I bought at the box store were supposed to work for 5/8" and 3/4" hose, but it wouldn't seal on the 3/4" and wouldn't fit into the 5/8".
          Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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          • #6
            If your hell bent on soldering it now, use some of that Harbor Freight aluminum "welding" rod, really a brazing rod.

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            • #7
              Reason

              Originally posted by Black_Moons
              You do know theres a good reason they are 2 parts?
              One part is the threaded clamp part.. And the other is the hose->washer interface.
              If you solder em togethor, you gotta rotate the whole hose to tighten it.. against the washer.

              I fully realized that was the purpose but I has no intention of removing the hose from the faucet. I leave the hose connected to the faucet all year round and don't remove it. Making the fitting solid would just eliminate another possible place for a leak to occur. I intended to screw the connector to the faucet and then install the hose and clamp on the connector. If I need to remove it, I'll loosen the clamp and remove the hose and then unscrew the connector from the faucet.
              Bill

              Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

              Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by BigBoy1
                Making the fitting solid would just eliminate another possible place for a leak to occur.
                No it wouldn't. You have two places where it seals. One is where the faucet contacts the hose barb (which is sealed with a flat washer) and the other is where the hose barb enters the hose, which is sealed by the interference fit between the two (usually with a little help from a ferrule or gear clamp).
                The area you are soldering/brazing never sees water.
                Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                • #9
                  It's because all the brass is delegated for making brass coated steel speaker cable .


                  .
                  .

                  Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                  • #10
                    I think the complaint is about how many of the "supplier" ChiCom products are fake, deceptive, and lower than the lowest standards. Any American or European company supplying Brass fittings found to be Aluminum would be vilified in the news, have government sanctions, have trade/Plumbing/Code organizations calling for banning the company, lawyers and insurance companies climbing all over them, and people lining up in the civil lawsuit process.

                    Yet there is no freaking real outcry, we buy these things, our stores from True Value to Homey Depot and Low's and even the "Mom and Pop" hardware stores (through vendors) continue to stock these parts - no lawyers, no news outcry, no lawyers, no civil suits. It is becoming scary, because so much of this crap is finding its way into critical housing and business construction, and even into HVAC - I had a piece go to hell in one month, nearly cost me a whole house of broken pipes by a new "made in China" part failing due to substandard manufacture.

                    Heck we hear the same thing on this board about other products, outles that are not grounded properly, lights with wires touching switches.....

                    My problem with Chinese/off shore brass is something a bit different though. For years I got Waterbury brass then southeast Am. Made brass, now it is from anywhere in the world, last load from China. I have made two and three piece candlesticks for years, but now the colors between the brass - even pieces "supposedly" from the same lot/cert vary so much that it is useless to hope to make a uniform looking product.
                    Last edited by spope14; 05-16-2010, 07:09 PM.
                    CCBW, MAH

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                    • #11
                      Had an air fitting at work, would not stop leaking. Took off and it was brass plated white plastic. You must have had the deluxe, MORE expensive fittings!
                      mark costello-Low speed steel

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                      • #12
                        I had a Chinese air fitting come appart. Notice how thin the broken section is in the photo below.

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                        • #13
                          Wait until you try to get a couple pieces of Chinese galvanized iron pipe to stop leaking at the threaded joint.

                          Apparently, their threads are not quite the same as ours.

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                          • #14
                            Why?

                            If Chinese stuff is as bad and as well-known as said why do you buy it in the first place - and why keep buying it?

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                            • #15
                              That is often all the vendors have!
                              "...do you not think you have enough machines?"

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