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  • Machinist Books on CD

    A recent post on the how to's of laying out prompted me to take a look on eBay for the Starrett Book for Apprentices. I ran across this seller who has several very good early 1900's books on CD including the Starrett book and several others. They are inexpensive enough and the early books detail some of the "lost arts" that the beginning home shop machinist should become familiar with. I have no affiliation and no idea of the quality, but you have little to lose.

    http://stores.ebay.com/CD-Book-Connection-by-dctb00kz
    Jim H.

  • #2
    Jim, that book is now called "The Starrett Book for Student Machinists" and is still available from Starrett for free. It's a great book.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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    • #3
      You can download most of those (and thousands more) for free from the Internet Archive and burn your own CD's.
      The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

      Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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      • #4
        Originally posted by lazlo
        Jim, that book is now called "The Starrett Book for Student Machinists" and is still available from Starrett for free. It's a great book.
        It used to be free, but is now sold for around $10.00 or so, still a bargain. (My last price list has it at $9.20.) I was specifically looking for the older, 30's vintage edition as it has more on using scribes, dividers and such for layout. Either one is an excellent reference for beginners.

        Originally posted by loose nut
        You can download most of those (and thousands more) for free from the Internet Archive and burn your own CD's.
        No doubt they are available from other sources as well. I just thought I would point out this as a reecommendation for those who could make use of the information. The older methods are very pertinent to the home shop, and if the beginner were to make use of some of these sources, many of the questions posed here on basics would be answered by them.
        Jim H.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by loose nut
          You can download most of those (and thousands more) for free from the Internet Archive and burn your own CD's.
          Link to the mentioned book: http://www.archive.org/details/starr...form00fairrich
          You can read online or download as pdf or other file format.

          .
          Thomas

          Problems worthy of attack prove their worth by hitting back
          - Piet Hein

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          • #6
            Starrett book for machinists' apprentices

            Originally posted by Thomas Staubo
            Thank you, Thomas. I grabbed the book and found a lot of things I want to go back over. I especially like the Toolmaker's Button section. I've always found that interesting.

            Jim

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            • #7
              Those engraved drawings are hard to beat with modern methods.

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              • #8
                I have downloaded over 1200 books from the archive, lots of good info in there. The only problem is reading on a computer screen. Maybe someone will make a E-book reader for PDF's that is large enough for old eyes and cheap enough for people to buy.
                The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

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                • #9
                  My father's 1929 twelfth edition was priced at 75 cents and at that time was still called "The Starrett Book for Machinists' Apprentices" and was volume one of "Starrett Books". Volume two is "The Starrett Data Book for Machinists" and volume three is "The Starrett Book for Motor Machinists and Auto Repairmen". Digital info systems are spectacular, but these old books are drop-dead beautiful, like "How to Run a Lathe" (25 cents, leatherette bound, 75 cents).
                  Atlas 10" with Babbitt bearings
                  "How to Run a Lathe", 33rd Edition, 1937
                  "Rogers Machinist's Guide" Copyright 1913

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                  • #10
                    Starrett Books Vol 2 & SB HTRAL

                    Originally posted by VicM
                    Volume two is "The Starrett Data Book for Machinists"
                    You can download Vol 2 PDF from Google Books ~ 8.4MB, 187 pages:
                    http://books.google.com/books?id=8O5...page&q&f=false
                    Haven't found Volume 3 yet.

                    SB How To Run A Lathe (1913, ~6.9MB) is available from http://www.wewilliams.net/SBLibrary.htm

                    Jim

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                    • #11
                      Buttons

                      Originally posted by JMcTool
                      Thank you, Thomas. I grabbed the book and found a lot of things I want to go back over. I especially like the Toolmaker's Button section. I've always found that interesting.

                      Jim
                      Jim.

                      The principal of the "Tool-makers buttons" is a variation of the principal of the sine bar - and some simple trigonometry. Here is a sketch I did for here some time ago:



                      I've shown the buttons equal - they need not be. They don't have to be any particular sizes either. As long as the diameters and radii are allowed for to get the centre distances you will be OK.

                      I've nominated the material as "Silver steel" - here in OZ - which is "O1" or "Drill rod" in the USA - but any handy material will do - as long as its it accurately round - it will work.

                      Tool-makers Buttons and sine bars are very simple but for some unknown reason that have that aura of mystery and mystique - which they don't deserve.

                      All too often "Tool-making" is regarded similarly - sometimes its justified - but not always.

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                      • #12
                        Here's a tutorial for toolmaker's buttons from an old Popular Science magazine:

                        http://books.google.com/books?id=iic...uttons&f=false

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                        • #13
                          I like this thread! I downloaded the Starrett book to my Mac as an Epub, added it to iTunes and then synced to my iPad. This took about 2 minutes. I can now read this book free of the internet for my next trip. If you don't have an Ipad you can read theses books on your pc or Mac with this download: http://www.lexcycle.com/desktop. Looks like there are millions of free books I will be able to upload. Sometimes some of this technology stuff has an upside.

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                          • #14
                            a book on the net if any good

                            http://chestofbooks.com/home-improve...ice/index.html

                            all the best.markj

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                            • #15
                              Toolmaker buttons

                              Originally posted by oldtiffie
                              Tool-makers Buttons and sine bars are very simple but for some unknown reason that have that aura of mystery and mystique - which they don't deserve.
                              Many thanks, OT. Once someone starts talking about the math, it all starts to make more sense to me. Probably a personality defect I was the same way with sine bars; once I saw the math I got it. Which reminds me, I need to brush up on my trigonometry some more.

                              After reading that part of the Starrett Apprentice, Google Books, and some old articles I see where I went wrong. Somehow I thought the button process was similar to transfer punches and that I just couldn't visualize it properly. Oh. Nope, it's about using an indicator to center the buttons on the lathe, which BINGO! also centers the target hole. Pull the button and make the hole.

                              dp: Thanks for your article, too. More examples are always helpful.

                              BTW, I finally figured out how to easily snag Google Book pages. I must be the last one around here to figure this out. Just CTL-S (save page, at least in Firefox) and then rummage around in the saved images for your page. Scroll, CTL-S, rummage. Lather, Repeat, Rinse. Makes Google Books a lot friendlier and easier to read at least for me.

                              Thanks a lot, guys. I always love it when I figure out something new.

                              Jim

                              Easily distracted by shiny objects

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