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Ot: Web Page Virus Scam

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  • #16
    I love Unix. This thread has been a conversation I never have. But I feel your pain.

    There is some good news for the pro-active out there. The VMware "Player" program which is free, is now capable of creating virtual machines from scratch. This means you can download Player and install it, then jack in your Windows DVD and install a second copy on your system.

    The second copy, the virtual machine, is the one you would run when hitting the internet. If it gets infected you drag the vm to your host OS's trash can and copy in a new vm from your backup DVD. You save time, you don't care about viruses anymore (very Mac-like experience), and no more worrying about corrupting your hard disk.

    http://www.vmware.com/products/player/

    Your host machine can be Windows or Linux, and your virtual machines can be pretty much anything, but most people use Windows as the vm as well as the host.

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    • #17
      I got hit by this last January. Maleware.bytes took care of the problem. But then when I was listening to the Super Bowl on the radio I heard and add for Internet Security. Talk about big brass ones.
      Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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      • #18
        had this happen a few days ago myself. VERY aggressive indeed!
        brent

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        • #19
          Virtual Machines are the coolest thing evah, but you need a fairly beefy computer to run one successfully. Web developers frequently run the browser, database, and web server on separate VMs to better simulate the production system and to test deployment procedures.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Tony Ennis
            Virtual Machines are the coolest thing evah, but you need a fairly beefy computer to run one successfully. Web developers frequently run the browser, database, and web server on separate VMs to better simulate the production system and to test deployment procedures.
            If you're just surfing the web and doing email, which is the pattern for a great many home users, then any modern system will work. I do everything on a Mac laptop, for example. 2G ram, 32-bit dual core cpu.

            Where I work we have hundreds of virtual machines running as web servers and back end systems. Our databases run on stand-alone clustered systems (8-core Linux). My desktop workstation is a Dell optiplex 760 - a low-end Windows PC, and I run Player on it so I can have Linux (in a vm) as my primary OS. I'm a Unix admin. Windows is used for email and calendaring only.

            I never use the Windows browser to visit sites outside our own network. For that I use the Firefox browser in Linux, and it is directed to use a proxy that filters out adverts, google analytics, and most other annoyances I find on the web.

            Here's the win7 "experience" for my Mac Laptop's vm:

            Last edited by dp; 05-19-2010, 11:50 AM.

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            • #21
              [/quote]

              This means you can download Player and install it, then jack in your Windows DVD and install a second copy on your [/quote]

              Dennis: Hate to appear stupid, but does "jack in your Windows DVD" mean to load /run the DVD?
              Sorry to be so ignorant of computer terms, but The language is a bit hard for me to understand. You IT professionals seem to have an idiom all your own....Just like other professions I suppose.
              Thanks for the information on using VMplayer.
              John Burchett
              in Byng OK

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              • #22
                This means you can download Player and install it, then jack in your Windows DVD and install a second copy on your [/quote]

                Dennis: Hate to appear stupid, but does "jack in your Windows DVD" mean to load /run the DVD?
                Sorry to be so ignorant of computer terms, but The language is a bit hard for me to understand. You IT professionals seem to have an idiom all your own....Just like other professions I suppose.
                Thanks for the information on using VMplayer.[/QUOTE]

                Yessir. Start Player, insert your Windows install CD/DVD into the drive, and install the OS as a virtual machine.

                VMware also has a free tool that will convert a running physical system to a virtual system so you basically clone a running box, including all the installed software, and run it as a virtual machine.

                Virtual machines can also be copied between machines - your Windows virtual machine can then run on a Linux host, a Mac, or another Windows host. This ability to copy is at the heart of recovering from a virus infestation.

                I keep three virtual machines on a thumb drive I carry around in my pocket.

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