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  • Tool and Cutter Grinder axis labels

    Anyone know the applicable rules here....

    the z axis is always the axis of the main spindle, but in the case of a T&CG its movable.

    I'm inclined to think the long left right table movement is Z, like the head was set like a cylindrical grinder . X is suppose to be the longest movement perpendicular to Z and usually horizontal...so its in and out movement of the table Y is what's left over, up and down of the head

    right or wrong?

    thanks
    .

  • #2
    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...e-axis-152203/

    It's called the "right hand rule". Orient the thumb, index and bird finger of your right hand 90° from each other. Point your thumb along the spindle centerline, in the work area of the machine. Your index finger is X, your bird finger Y and your thumb is Z. All fingers should point positive.
    Axis A, B, C are relative to the three primary axis. A is rotational about the X axis, B is rotational about the Y axis, and C is rotational about the Z axis. (These can also be designated as rx, ry & rz, most notably on robots.)
    Note: This does not _always_ apply, as there are some odd-ball and downright weird machines out there, mostly in specific applications.
    Precision takes time.

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    • #3
      thanks Ringer, I know rule....but it starts with the main spindle defining Z, then the rule defines the other axis and direction.....but what direction is Z? I'd think Z would be along the table's axis because that's the most common spindle orientation...but is it? I mean the spindle's often used 90 degrees from that
      .

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Mcgyver
        thanks Ringer, I know rule....but it starts with the main spindle defining Z, then the rule defines the other axis and direction.....but what direction is Z? I'd think Z would be along the table's axis because that's the most common spindle orientation...but is it? I mean the spindle's often used 90 degrees from that
        If You nod and tilt the head on a Bridgeport vertical mill the Z axis is still the spindle.

        Steve

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        • #5
          Originally posted by doctor demo
          If You nod and tilt the head on a Bridgeport vertical mill the Z axis is still the spindle.

          Steve
          so on a T&CG if you rotate the head 90 the Z becomes the X and X becomes the Z? it hasn't been standardized, at least by the users that standing in front of the machine the long table direction is the Z?
          .

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Mcgyver
            so on a T&CG if you rotate the head 90 the Z becomes the X and X becomes the Z? it hasn't been standardized, at least by the users that standing in front of the machine the long table direction is the Z?
            Aint life a grind
            John

            I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

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            • #7
              Well I can't say for sure and I can't find any hard evidence, but the point I was attempting to make was that the spindle no matter what plane it is in is still the Z. So I would say that the work head on a T&G would be Z, and the long table travel would be X and the other would be Y. Now I'm confusing Myself, so I'm going to keep looking.

              Steve

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              • #8
                http://yarchive.net/metal/axis_naming.html

                I feel your pain! I looked at my Universal ID OD Cylindrical Grinder for about 5 miliseconds when I forst got it and just shook my head and walked away. Too many rotating and swiveling axes to properly name (and remember)
                Last edited by Glenn Wegman; 05-17-2010, 10:41 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by doctor demo
                  Well I can't say for sure and I can't find any hard evidence, but the point I was attempting to make was that the spindle no matter what plane it is in is still the Z. So I would say that the work head on a T&G would be Z, and the long table travel would be X and the other would be Y. Now I'm confusing Myself, so I'm going to keep looking.:
                  most of the time my spindle is close to or parallel to the long table movement so it would be Z....like a lathe carriage along the bed is motion along the Z axis (parallel to the spindle). Of course if i moved the head I'd have to get the chalk board out

                  well if i I don't get slapped down here for calling the long table axis the Z axis I'm, probably ok doing so most other places thanks for the input
                  Last edited by Mcgyver; 05-18-2010, 01:28 AM.
                  .

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                  • #10
                    Axis

                    Hi Mcgyver.

                    Will this help? I think the surface grinder axis is "B":


                    and these?


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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by oldtiffie
                      Hi Mcgyver.

                      Will this help?
                      thanks OT, but no, those are for a vertical spindle machine..

                      I think the surface grinder axis is "B":
                      The main spindle is always Z, on a surface grinder Z is horizontal.

                      I get the standard and rules and how all this works, its just the movable spindle of a T&CG creates ambiguity. Steve makes a good point that when you've move the spindle, you've moved the axis so maybe I'm stuck with the ambiguity. Failing coverage from the EIA (who creates these standards), I thought maybe there'd be an common use convention ...doesn't look like that's the case
                      .

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                      • #12
                        I think, though I admit that I could be wrong here, that although the spindle/tool is always Z, the quill orientation does not always correspond to Z. In other words, Z refers to the distance that the tool is from the flat plane of X and Y. Z does not always refer to how the tool moves on the machine.

                        For example: A milling machine with a right angle spindle attachment would still have a vertical Z even though the axis of the tool rotation would be at a right angle to Z.

                        - BDC

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                        • #13

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by sid pileski


                            Never had the chance to use this, but on this job it was a real time saver.
                            Worked out nice!

                            Sid
                            Here's an interresting pic from another thread.

                            Seems it would possibly change in relation to spindle orientation.

                            In the above pic of a mill with a right angle adapter it seems to me that what was X (long table axis) just became Z, what was Z (the quill) just became Y, what was M (the knee) just became U, and what was Y (cross feed) is now X.

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