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    Craftsman Wood Compound Cut Off Saw. A very heavilly built old Power Tool. I was considering just putting a Abrasive Blade on it for chopping steel angle and such up. Any reasons why this may be a dumb idea? thanx Mike

  • #2
    The plastic blade guard could melt and be a problem.

    Abrasive blades are usually 14" while the largest miter saws are only 12".

    You will need to add some kind of vise to the saw to hold the workpiece in the even of a blade jam or similar mishap. (metal is not very forgiving when the blade is not aligned with the cut.)

    Lastly, if your saw is made of aluminum or magnesium it could be a fire hazard if used as an abrasive chop saw.
    Last edited by BillDaCatt; 05-18-2010, 09:51 AM.

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    • #3
      Glad for the post, have one of those old saws and was considering the same thing! That's not to say that it can't be modified!

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      • #4
        Madman, I routinely use mine for cutting aluminum, including 11/2"x2" cast, using the standard blade. How about getting a cold cut blade from Princess Auto? Blade speed might be a consideration, but sparks wont.
        Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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        • #5
          I bought a Sears mitre saw (from the distressed bin) YEARS ago. It was so cheap, I never worried about killing it. Abrasive blades on steel, dull wood blades on Al, it now has a HF metal blade, Masonry abrasive for tile, It won't die.

          DJ

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          • #6
            Wood Saw for Alum.

            I have a 10" chop saw I use on aluminum sometimes. I put blade stabilizers on it and now it makes a lot cleaner cut with a lot less noise. I'm using an 80 tooth carbide blade for wood. The blades made for metal are probably better, but this one works fine. I tried using a radial arm saw, but the blade kept pulling into the workpiece and jamming. The chop saw goes up and down and is much more controllable. Blade stabilizers are like thick washers that go on both sides of the blade and keep sideways harmonic vibration to a minimum. They are good for a table saw too.

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