Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A man and his invention. Safety first!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • A man and his invention. Safety first!

    Take a look at this video. Here is a man who has absolute confidence in his safety devise. This could be the next OSHA requirement.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=E3mzhvMgrLE&NR=1

  • #2
    Apparently, he approached all the major tool makers and they all said that they are not interested. I can under why. It becomes a huge liability issue.

    Frankly I would want this in my table saw. Having a wet piece of wood could cause unnecessary and expensive damage.

    Comment


    • #3
      I saw this awhile ago, just amazing! This type of thing could be used for quite a few aplications.
      Andy

      Comment


      • #4
        and they all said that they are not interested.
        It doubles the cost of the saw. And there are false positives. Each false costs about $200 or more. And it has to be very hard on the saw.

        I believe it is available as an aftermarket add-on.

        Comment


        • #5
          You can buy a saw equipped with this today. It isn't cheap:

          http://www.dynamitetoolco.com/SawSto....htm&click=123

          Ryobi has already lost a lawsuit by a worker injured on one of its saws- they were held liable for selling a saw without it:

          http://www.boston.com/yourtown/malde...kind_saw_case/

          So if you want to buy a table saw for your shop without having to pay an additional $1,000 or so for a Sawstop, you'd better buy it soon. You will already probably be paying more for the saw becasue all saw manufacturers' insurance premiums have probably now gone through the roof

          Comment


          • #6
            Oh, and regarding the video, I don't care how many times I saw it work on a hot dog, I could never force myself to touch a spinning table saw blade like the guy in the video!

            Comment


            • #7
              This saw isn't that new (maybe 5 years old?).
              You can't saw metal on it, except you switch off the safety feature.

              On one hand, I think it is really great. On the other hand, I feel it promotes user's stupidity and carelessness.

              For sure, a finger is more worth than 10 of those saws. But the no-metal, no-whet-wood disadvantage is what stops me from buying one. Besides of that, I don't need a table saw.


              Nick

              Comment


              • #8
                Sticky wicket

                This is a real can-o-worms. On one hand, it makes loads of sense to protect the operator against 'loss of limb'. On the other hand, it seems the operator has some serious responsibility to protect him/herself.

                IMHO, loss of fingers at home is YOUR OWN FAULT. Great learning experience and YOU CAN STILL WALK. DEAL WITH IT!

                My good friend lost the use of his legs this Winter skiing. Is he blaming anyone else? NO.
                Why?
                IT WAS HIS OWN FAULT!

                The guy who sued somebody because he cut his hand on a table saw should be SHOT AND PISSED ON.

                I'm stopping now before I get thrown out.
                Please don't tell me where this cretin lives.
                Mike

                My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

                Comment


                • #9
                  why not have a mechanism that just pulls the saw blade downwards?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    A guy I knew owned a van conversion shop in No. CA. Managed to cut off three fingers on a table saw that he had removed the guard from, almost cut off the fourth. Got him and them to the doctor in time and had them re-attached. After he had been back at work a few weeks, with his hand in a major cast/stud device, a customer of his stopped by...saw his hand and asked what had happened. The shop owner explained the situation, and the customer's next words were, "Who do you want to sue?" (Editorial content: [email protected] those greedy lawyers!) My acquaintance politely told the lawyer-customer that he had taken off the guard and it was his own stupidity and carelessness that had caused the accident...and he was not suing anyone!

                    David
                    David Kaiser
                    “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
                    ― Robert A. Heinlein

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If it does catch on there might be an upside. Maybe professional shops will have to upgrade fast to the new safety saws, and the market will be flooded with good cheap used table saws without the device.

                      I can't see how a table saw can possibly be used with a guard. Sure, if someone designed a guard that would seamlessly retract as the work got to it I might consider using a guard, but seeing the guard push my work off line and away from the fence - forget it.

                      I can see how you can get careless if you're using the saw day in, day out. I just stay scared full time when the saw is on, and I concentrate fully. Like when I'm carrying an open pot of paint around. Like on lots of occasions. Concentrate on not being a pratt !

                      If you're having a clumsy day, do the accounts.
                      Richard - SW London, UK, EU.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by rohart
                        I just stay scared full time when the saw is on, and I concentrate fully. Like when I'm carrying an open pot of paint around. Like on lots of occasions. Concentrate on not being a pratt !

                        If you're having a clumsy day, do the accounts.
                        Right on!
                        Except the part about being a pratt. I have no clue about what a 'pratt' is.
                        I'm part Britt and know not to 'prang' things. Is a 'pratt' the hapless fool that does the 'pranging'?

                        Seriously, I love this bit.
                        "I just stay scared full time when the saw is on"
                        I live that too.
                        Mike

                        My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Pratt is just a couple of swear words molded into one ..so the word no longer reads as a swear word ..so it's a combination of pr*ck and tw*t...the extra t is because lots of people have the sirname pratt....so thats how it got spelt.

                          all the best.markj
                          Last edited by aboard_epsilon; 05-20-2010, 08:57 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I don't feel this should be an industrial standard or commercial contractor must have. I feel this saw should really only be a home shop saw.

                            I also agree that if they could retract the saw down as fast as they can make it stop that would be a better deal. Wakes up the operator and all you would have to do is re-engage the depth controls and crank the blade back up and continue working.
                            Andy

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rohart
                              If it does catch on there might be an upside. Maybe professional shops will have to upgrade fast to the new safety saws, and the market will be flooded with good cheap used table saws without the device.
                              I wouldn't want to bet on that (at least not with my own money ). If it became mandatory, there's a good chance that the old saws would have to be totally scrapped. I can see some saw manufactures not being totally against such a law since it would prevent a potential customer from buying used instead of new and since every person with a Saw Stop is going to have to buy a new blade every time the unit "works it's magic", blade manufactures would love to see these things on every saw out there! I can sure see the safety zealots/fanatics pushing the scrapping of the old saws in the name of saving us from ourselves. Can't be selling "unsafe" saws to the general public if they are unsafe for a professional, eh?
                              Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X