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  • Help! I've inherited 2 lathes.

    I realize that I don't belong on this blog because I'm not one of the "guys". I'm a female physician, not a machinist, or even a want to be machinist. However, you all seemed like the best people to ask for some solid advice on my issue at hand. So, my apologies in advance for disturbing your shop reveries, although I have found some of them (especially the Folsom Prison tour group thread) very entertaining.

    My husband died last year and I am slowly getting around to clearing away some of the massive accumulation of things in a 3 car garage in which I have never parked in in 32 years, secondary to my husbands many hobbies. He was a scientist who was very "handy" and just loved his garage as his escape for some quite time. Most of the items in the garage I have had no difficulty knowing how to place a value on, one of our three adult sons have wanted them, or I have had need to keep a few of them myself. I am not without some personal hands on skills on small woodworking projects.

    However, I have come to a dead halt when it comes to the 2 lathes he left behind. Both are in good working condition. The easier of the two to describe is a 1992 Enco 12X36 lathe on a table with cabinet drawers, with a significant number of attachments, most of which I do not know the exact names of. However, I did count 26 different sizes of collars--I believe this is the correct term (the device a drill bit would fit into). There are several chucks, 3 boxes of drill bits in every imaginable size including large cone shaped ones, several of what I would refer to as cutting blades, hex wrenches and other tools, such as wrenches, for working on the lathe itself in a tool box that matches the lathe and it's table in color. Additionally, there are 3 large, heavy, round, metal discs that clearly go with this lathe which I am clueless about regarding their use. They range from 6" to 12" or 13" in diameter and are several inches in heights. They appear to have been designed for different purposes. These three I have to use 2 hands to lift because they are so heavy. There are also 3 large clamp like pieces which may be stabilizing devices. There are many more odds and ends which I found in the cabinet but this gives you a general idea of the accessories which I have found.

    The second lathe is an antique. My husband's grandfather, who became a machinist after he walking out of Russia at the age of 13 and emigrating to the United States, used it in his shop in Ohio. It is an EMco not an Enco. It was made in Austria. I do have the original instruction booklet for it. It is a Maximat MQ-3100. The best way to describe this lathe is to go to a web site that can do it far better than I: www.lathes.co.uk. Both motors purr on this device. It needs a couple of new belts, but this is easily possible. It has extra equipment with it, but not to the extent of the Enco.

    So my question to the experts is what are these machines worth? Fair and reasonable price, nothing exorbitant. I have looked at Craigs lists all over the country, called Enco personally, looked on eBay, and I have yet to to come up with a clear concept of their worth. This is simply out of my field of expertise. Can you help me?

    Katherine

  • #2
    The Enco new is $2500, see:

    http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?P...PMPXNO=9033434

    I would price the Enco lathe at $1000 since it's used and see if anyone bites. If no one takes it after two weeks, drop the price $200. If still no takers, drop again. You could try a similar approach with the Maximat.

    Comment


    • #3
      The MQ3100 if in decent shape can sell for $1500 to $2000. Does it have the mill as well as the headstock? On that lathe the headstock can be taken off and used as the mill, but it's not very convenient.

      The Enco... around $1000, maybe more... depends on the tooling package and quality.


      Pictures would really help.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi Katherine,
        Used tools are worth whatever someone is willing to pay.

        The Enco 12x36 is an import lathe that is still available from Enco as well as from other companies. It is very popular, and it's a decent lathe for the home shop. New, they go for $1800 - $3000, depending on which company you buy it from. Obviously, you aren't going to get the price of a new lathe.

        Most of the accessories you describe come with the lathe and are included in the price. I'm sure your late husband accumulated additional accessories, like the collets, but that's not going to help the price that much. Personally, I wouldn't pay much more than $1000 - $1200, bearing in mind that I could get a new, equivalent 12x36 from Harbor Freight for $1800 - $2000.

        I'm not familiar with the Maximat, but hopefully someone else will be along to help you with that.

        In general, most people will only pay about 1/2 the price of new, for used tools, if even that. Factor in the poor economy, and I'm sorry to say that you may not get a lot on the sale of these tools.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yes, the MQ3100 does have both the mill and the headstock, if you are referring to the horizontal component on one side that's run by one motor and then the separate vertical component on the other side of it that's run by a completely separate motor, which is what I think you are asking.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by MTNGUN
            Hi Katherine,
            Used tools are worth whatever someone is willing to pay.

            The Enco 12x36 is an import lathe that is still available from Enco as well as from other companies. It is very popular, and it's a decent lathe for the home shop. New, they go for $1800 - $3000, depending on which company you buy it from. Obviously, you aren't going to get the price of a new lathe.

            Most of the accessories you describe come with the lathe and are included in the price. I'm sure your late husband accumulated additional accessories, like the collets, but that's not going to help the price that much. Personally, I wouldn't pay much more than $1000 - $1200, bearing in mind that I could get a new, equivalent 12x36 from Harbor Freight for $1800 - $2000.

            I'm not familiar with the Maximat, but hopefully someone else will be along to help you with that.

            In general, most people will only pay about 1/2 the price of new, for used tools, if even that. Factor in the poor economy, and I'm sorry to say that you may not get a lot on the sale of these tools.
            I'm not so worried about the amount of money. I'd just like to be in the general ball park when I advertise these items and I really could not get a feel for them. Usually you can research these things and get some sort of and idea. But, when you call Enco and they won't even give you any idea . . . . .and then the other machine is from 1962?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by lakeside53
              The MQ3100 if in decent shape can sell for $1500 to $2000. Does it have the mill as well as the headstock? On that lathe the headstock can be taken off and used as the mill, but it's not very convenient.

              The Enco... around $1000, maybe more... depends on the tooling package and quality.


              Pictures would really help.
              I didn't figure out this quick reply thing previously, so my earlier response to is somewhere in the thread. I have some photos of the Enco I took earlier today. I'm not sure how to put them on this site. I'll see if I can get them on. The Emco will have to wait till dawns light.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by woodswhole
                Yes, the MQ3100 does have both the mill and the headstock, if you are referring to the horizontal component on one side that's run by one motor and then the separate vertical component on the other side of it that's run by a completely separate motor, which is what I think you are asking.

                That configuration will bring good interest. The Emco machines are top quality and have followers that pay good money.. Oh.. I own an EMCO

                The MQ3100 does not have a hardened bed. Take a close picture of the ways (two long flat metal surfaces that go the length of the bed) near the headstock -that will tell a lot about the wear.
                Last edited by lakeside53; 05-24-2010, 12:20 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  First off, my condolences for your loss.

                  Second, what help I can provide: I'll grab some example items from eBay just as a quick and dirty sample. They will not be representative of a given item's value, nor will they look exactly the same. They're just general/generic examples.

                  The 26 objects are "collets", most likely 5C given the vintage of the lathe. They hold the workpiece in the lathe spindle. You will likely find an object that looks either like this or this in amongst the accessories- these are 'closers' for the collets.

                  The round discs are either chucks or faceplates or both. A chuck will typically be either a "4-jaw" or a "3-jaw". A "faceplate" will just be thin, flat and have holes or slots.

                  The "clamp like pieces" are probably steady and follow rests. A "follow rest" will have two 'fingers' and a "steady rest" will have three, forming a complete circle.

                  The overall value of the machine depends on your area (it'd be worth half as much on the East Coast, for example, as it would up here in Alaska) the condition of the machine (machine tools are built to very close tolerances- it doesn't take much to make one "worn out") and what sort of accessories it has (sounds like yours is pretty well tooled up.)

                  Extremely rough ballpark figure? $1,800 maybe? Some of the others can pip up as well, get a sort of consensus.

                  The EMCO will be considered a bit more 'valuable' being a European import rather than an Asian import, but again, it'll depend on condition, accessories and location.

                  Photos could help a lot- we can tell a lot by a picture, and ID some of the smaller ancillary bits as well.

                  Doc.
                  Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Woodshole contact the member Ace

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by woodswhole
                      I didn't figure out this quick reply thing previously, so my earlier response to is somewhere in the thread. I have some photos of the Enco I took earlier today. I'm not sure how to put them on this site. I'll see if I can get them on. The Emco will have to wait till dawns light.
                      I will take exactly those photos and more in the morning. These machines are in California, so I'm on PST. Thank you so much for such specific advice.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If you said where they are located, I missed it. Location matters a great deal, and they will bring a lot more in Southern CA than in Chicago (going from your profile location).

                        Edit: Of course, seconds before I click "submit", you answer my question.

                        As for posting photos, click here for a thread describing how.

                        Edit: Fixed link
                        Last edited by BadDog; 05-24-2010, 01:57 AM.
                        Russ
                        Master Floor Sweeper

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Doc Nickel
                          First off, my condolences for your loss.

                          Second, what help I can provide: I'll grab some example items from eBay just as a quick and dirty sample. They will not be representative of a given item's value, nor will they look exactly the same. They're just general/generic examples.

                          The 26 objects are "collets", most likely 5C given the vintage of the lathe. They hold the workpiece in the lathe spindle. You will likely find an object that looks either like this or this in amongst the accessories- these are 'closers' for the collets.

                          The round discs are either chucks or faceplates or both. A chuck will typically be either a "4-jaw" or a "3-jaw". A "faceplate" will just be thin, flat and have holes or slots.

                          The "clamp like pieces" are probably steady and follow rests. A "follow rest" will have two 'fingers' and a "steady rest" will have three, forming a complete circle.

                          The overall value of the machine depends on your area (it'd be worth half as much on the East Coast, for example, as it would up here in Alaska) the condition of the machine (machine tools are built to very close tolerances- it doesn't take much to make one "worn out") and what sort of accessories it has (sounds like yours is pretty well tooled up.)

                          Extremely rough ballpark figure? $1,800 maybe? Some of the others can pip up as well, get a sort of consensus.

                          The EMCO will be considered a bit more 'valuable' being a European import rather than an Asian import, but again, it'll depend on condition, accessories and location.

                          Photos could help a lot- we can tell a lot by a picture, and ID some of the smaller ancillary bits as well.

                          Doc.
                          My gosh, I can't tell you what a great teacher you are! I feel as though I am in Machine Class 1A. The photos were very helpful. I do have a 4-jaw and a 3-jaw chuck and a faceplate, plus both the follow and the steady rest. I love being able to name things. It makes life and communication so much easier. Both these machines are in my main home in Del Mar, CA. I am working on the photos, but probably won't get them on line until tomorrow morning because the light just isn't that great at night. K

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Dr Stan
                            Woodshole contact the member Ace
                            Dr. Stan,
                            I'm not sure, since I really don't do forums or blogs, how to locate "Ace".
                            Katherine

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Best wishes

                              Originally Posted by lakeside53
                              The MQ3100 if in decent shape can sell for $1500 to $2000. Does it have the mill as well as the headstock? On that lathe the headstock can be taken off and used as the mill, but it's not very convenient.

                              The Enco... around $1000, maybe more... depends on the tooling package and quality.


                              Pictures would really help.
                              Originally posted by woodswhole
                              I didn't figure out this quick reply thing previously, so my earlier response to is somewhere in the thread. I have some photos of the Enco I took earlier today. I'm not sure how to put them on this site. I'll see if I can get them on. The Emco will have to wait till dawns light.
                              Katherine.

                              My condolences.

                              Re. the pics. - I guess you know - or could get someone else - to attach photos to an email. If you were to attach them to an email to any of us here, they could post it to their on-line "Photo Bucket" account and then post the link either to their own post here or email the link for you to post here yourself (just a quick "cut and paste" job - just a few minutes work).

                              All of us are going to have to either dispose of our tools or have them disposed of for us eventually, so its not something that we are unaware of.

                              I wish you everything that you wish for yourself.

                              Comment

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